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Use this thread to ask questions you think don't require a thread of their own.

The old thread no longer bumps: >>2775866

If you didn't get a response in the old thread, feel free to ask again here.
>>
>>2780104
What's a cheap DIY way to get a rotating EM field ?
>>
I've got a short section of thin walled aluminium pipe (32mm ID, ~35mm OD) that I want to ride over a thinner piece of pipe with maybe 10mm of movement, what's a good way to make it adjustable and locking? The forces involved are minor, I'm thinking I just cut a couple of channels in the larger pipe internally for o-rings.

Ideally I could thread both pieces of pipe together, but I don't want any pay 20 bucks for taps I'll use once. One of those captive ball bearing things with a small spring behind it could work, but hammering in the aluminium to hold it in place seems fiddly.
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>>2780105
Put a magnet on something that turns
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>>2780104
Im making a cushion out of foam. The cushion rests up against a weird edge. The edge starts super sharp and becomes wider as it goes along. The foam is rectangular. I need to cut that angle out of the foam. I have no idea how. I have a template. Help, how do I model a complex 3d shape exactly and transfer its dimensions to a precise cut out of the foam?
>>
how can I kill a combustion engine from a distance?
I can modify the engine, and it does not have to be wireless (in fact I would prefer wired), but I do have to be able to kill it reliably and quickly without being near it, say for example, 10m away
I don't need a specifically model outlined, just the options that are open for me to look into
>>
>>2780188
A relay that kills the ignition.
>>
>>2780209
thanks for the suggestion, I've had a bit of a look into that
will that turn the engine off if it's already running, or only prevent it from starting?
my use case is here that the engine is already running, and I need to be able to switch it off from a distance
>>
>>2780282
"The ignition" is not the starter, anon.
The ignition is what energizes the spark plugs.
The answer really depends on the engine and ignition ... is it electronic? Coil and disributor?

It would be simple in an old car, but it may be much more complicated if everything is managed by a computer.
What kind of car is it?
>>
>>2780286
>"The ignition" is not the starter, anon.
>The ignition is what energizes the spark plugs.
I see
thanks for explaining that, I don't work on engines often
after a quick search the engine seems to be electronic ignition, as far as I can tell there's no computers involved, just a turn key, a choke, and a lever I can adjust to up the power
it's powering a pump rather than driving a car, I will have a separate kill switch for the pressure
I think what you've given me here is enough to follow up on a solution, thanks for that
>>
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Do you know anyone making a less retarded version of picrel that's hex and not spline?
>10mm-24mm range
>pass thru
>flex ratchet
Optimally I'd like a 8-24 with different ratchets and extensions so I can use appropriate size ratchet for each socket, but I doubt anyone makes it.
No, I do not want a spline nut rounder set, there is 0 benefit to spline or 12pt sockets that go in a ratchet.
>>
>>2780324
>, there is 0 benefit to spline or 12pt sockets that go in a ratchet.

12 points fit some square head bolts.
>>
>>2780326
>square head bolts
It's pretty clear the previous poster is looking for a ratchet for hex head bolts, since he said he's looking for hex sockets.
But thanks I guess? For chiming in with some bullshit unrelated situation when splined sockets might actually be useful, but offers nothing whatsoever to help, other than to provide some kind of pedantic "gotcha."
>>
>>2780336
>some bullshit unrelated situation when splined sockets might actually be useful

He said 12 points - not splined.
Not all splined are 12 point
Not all 12 point are splined

>gotcha
>>
>>2780347
reading is hard. thinking is harder. Have a nice day, sir.
>>
>>2780347
>"version of picrel that's hex"
he said he's looking for hex sockets

>>2780326 responded with "12 points fit some square head bolts"
As though that's a useful bit of information for someone looking for hex sockets.
>>
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>>2780347
Ah, you're correct.
You're replying to me. I wrote splined but you're right, he was talking about 12 point.
I actually didn't know that spline sockets are a thing. I just assumed they "spline" meant "12 point."

>gotcha
Got me all right!
And taught me something!
>>
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>>2780324
>>2780326
>>2780336
>>2780347
>>2780349
>>2780374
>>2780436
Frens, it's all good.
I'm just trying to minmax a socket set for an old Toyota trugg.
8,10,12,14,17,19,21,24 is all I need
Everything is hex, so no need for splines.
Looks like pass thru peaked 10 years ago and unless in willing to pay ebay funko pop prices for a shitty craftsman set, I'm out of luck.

I'll just get a set of ratcheting flex wrenches and a set of deep sockets and call it a night. Plus that way I'm not locked into a proprietary extension and socket format.
>>
>>2780324
>>2780496
Gearwrench. There’s a smaller drive size off pass>thru ratchets as well, the only issue ls being availability in Yurop and I’m not sure if they make a 24mm pass-thru
>>
>>2780504
That apex set is sold under half a dozen different brands. Kinda a dick move, the sata one is half the price but doesn't have a flex ratchet. Implying the extra spring and detent are worth $35.

Anyway they used to make a "1/2" drive up to 32mm, but it was discontinued. Tops out at 19mm.
Suppose I could still get it and just add the 21 and 24 regular sockets. Those are for oil plugs and axle nuts anyway, they don't need to be deep or pass.

Another thing, I have a set of inch impact sockets that have a 7/8" hex on the outside.
>picrel
They are pass thru until 3/4" because 1/2" hole for the square drive.
Only thing is they don't retain well in a wrench so kinda pain in the ass to use them like that.
I'm sure I can find the same metric set.
>>
>>2780104
plumber apprentice here, often there are houses/buildings with water tanks in the roofs (like picrel.jpg) looking to make a pipe to another service/secondary tank, but many times there is a step in the pipe line; while possible to make hole in the step itself, it's not desirable due to unknown electricity,gas lines inside the wall or the hole would point to inaccessible areas to work on. The main water tanks connector outs are mostly below the step level, more or less 1 or 1 and half inches. Is there a way to calculate/estimate the necessary water level(s) inside the tank(s) to assure the water will flow over the step without needing a pump?
Sometimes is one tank, sometimes are two or more tanks (IDK if call it connected in "series" (like the electric circuit things) since with the same pipe it flows in and out from the tanks,and the same pipe feeds all tanks/services).
I always resort to the tanks being full, and seems to work, but at which level the flow will stop? (since the water intake is below the step level).
Thanks
>>
>>2780537
>often there are houses/buildings with water tanks in the roofs
I've heard of this before, but never seen one, and I've lived across the US. Where/why are these used?
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Does oiled wood breathe well? I got some outdoor application that gets wet frequently. Seems epoxying the drill holes is useless if im just gonna apply some oil
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>>2780546
>Where/why are these used?
LA, mostly near the border,hotels, factories,condos; to store water for the tap.
>>
>>2780535
The flex head ratchet is totally worth the exfra money. It makes the set far more useful. There’s also an adapter to a square drive for those ratchets I think, so you could stick a non pass thru socket on there.

These Husky 3/8” drive nano impact sockets fit in those Apex pass-thru ratchets. I think they’re a 17mm hex on the outside. Only thint is the socket retention with the pass thru ratchet isn’t as good as the pass thru sockets, so make sure not to knock them out in an engine bay.
>>
>>2780572
Again, why would you need to store water for the tap?
>>
I'm out of dad's garage, and on the brink of starting my own tool collection.
I don't expect to find myself in working environments where I can't bring an an compressor.
Is it smarter to invest in power tools or pneumatic tools?
I'm not afraid of the maintenance that comes with the ladder.
>>
>>2780578
It's done in countries where the plumbed water isn't safe for drinking.
>>
I want to keep my cat off my counters using sound. I bought a key locator beeper and put it on his collar, it was loud and effective but he kept removing it. Now I want to have 3+ wireless speakers sitting on my counters, independently remote controlled, making noise at the push of a button. Is there a cheap easy way to do this? Basically I want a bigger louder version of the key beeper things. Bluetooth speakers are way too expensive and finicky for what I need. I don't care what noise is made as long as it's loud and annoying.
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>>2780575
>17mm hex on the outside
7/8 or 22mm because 1/2" drive. I don't have 3/8 impacts.
I see astro makes a 17mm wrench for the 3/8 sockets with a retainer ring. Hopefully they make a 22mm one too.
Anyway, looks like that gearwrench set is nice and I can just add a few regular sockets to it, spark plug, 21mm & 24mm
>>2780645
I did air tools first. You can buy high end air tools for cheap on fleabay. I paid $45 for a mac impact and $25 for a snap on air ratchet.
Especially if you intend to run continuous use tools like grinders and such.

I recommend you go for a 30+ gal compressor and buy one of the quiet ones.

Thing is you will need some kind of a compressor, so might as well start with air tools too. See if you feel like getting into battery later. I did, but mostly because there is no power on 80% of my property.
>>
>>2780687
>30
Ok maybe 20+, but just don't buy the lil 5 gal portable because it doesn't have enough air, especially fo continous use tools like grinders.
>>
my father has disgusting old linoleum in his kitchen that I’d like to replace. what is the best diy friendly material to replace it with (preferably not slippery since he’s an old timer)?
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>>2780718
The only other thing I'd ever want in a kitchen is tile, and doing a whole kitchen isn't a fun tile job for a first-timer. The easiest thing would be just redo the linoleum. Linoleum isn't what it was back in the 1980s, nowadays it's thicc PVC and available in a huge variety of colors and patterns, printed to looks like various hardwood, tile, or stone, with embossed textures and shit. It's a huge upgrade over the garbage that plagues the kitchens of so many older homes, and there are numerous options for under $1/sqft. If you're really feeling lazy, and his existing floor is still adhered well, you can use peel and stick flooring. It's still typically <$2/sqft, pick up a spray bottle of floor primer while you're at it, there are ones sold specifically for peel-and-stick vinyl flooring. Clean, spray your primer, peel and stick the vinyl "tiles", done. It's stupid fucking easy and so long as you're not a spaz you can get some really nice results from it. It's the only way I can imagine a total amateur pulling this off in an afternoon and being totally happy with the result.
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>>2780725
the current linoleum is trashed so I’d want to remove it. maybe the best bet would be me removing the linoleum and appliances and having someone install new linoleum.
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>>2780729
Maybe so. Installing linoleum isn't hard, but if you're already considering letting someone else do it, go for it. They'll be in and out in a hurry.
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>>2780729
Roll vinyl (9' or 12') is now 'loose lay'
It's very flexible with a slightly spongy back.
Unroll it cut to fit with a 1/8"-1/4" gap to allow for expansion and you're done.
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What is this stuff the Blade Runners are spraying on the ULEZ cameras? Polyurethane?
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>>2780750

Don't they have cameras watching the cameras?
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>>2780104
Is this the right board to talk about gardening or is it /pit?
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>>2780750

whatever it is, looks like great stuff
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>>2780761
gardening is pretty stupid, so this is the place
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Anyone know of a replacement carb for this old tiller based on this pic?

That orange but goes straight down into the fuel tank and the air intake has a little rubber boot that connects to that tube

I'm gonna try hitting it with some carb cleaner but I have no clue what those adjustment screws do so I doubt I'll be able to get this thing running without some sort of documentation
>>
>>2780810

there will be stamping or a tag on the engine
look up the numbers from the tag to find documentation

ezpz
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>>2780810
This one seems to be a similar shape, but idk about the levers and stuff

(auction site) /itm/ 112256233320
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>>2780810
>>2780817
or item number 283579298047
difference between the b&s 3hp vs 5hp was 5 had an angled mounting flange
>>
>>2780821
>>2780817
They both seem to be angled. That's probably fine though, since it'll angle away from the exhaust/muffler.

I'm wondering if someone actually knew what they were doing when they put together that rebuild kit. The carb attaches directly to the fuel tank so idk why they'd have a fuel filter, cutoff, and hose clamps
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What shower fixture is this? There is also a pipe near the ceiling for the shower head. I need to know what to buy to finish this. Thanks :)
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>>2780827
>I'm wondering if someone actually knew what they were doing when they put together that rebuild kit.
the answer with those chin chong ping pong kits is most certainly no
my experience with chinkshit carbs has been 2 out of 3 work perfectly fine, but the loser one will drive you crazy trying to get it to run
>>
>>2780761
You'd probably have better luck on /out/
>>
I need two sizes of aluminum square tube stock that could be used for a telescoping mast/pole. Home depot doesn't have this, they have like 1/2" and 1" square tube. Where else can I find such stock in more size selection locally? In lower NH, and ideally I'd get hands on the pieces before buying
>>
>>2780555
What oil are you using and what is your objective? (i.e. prevent discoloration, prevent warping, etc. )
>>
I don't have a question. I just wanted to say that I finally replaced my broken garbage disposal. Feels good man. Thanks for reading my blog
>>
If I buy a bunch of patio/ diner tables from Facebook and epoxy coat them with pennies could I make a profit charging 5x the original price ?
>>
>>2780795
>>2780876
>the one rabbi says yes, the other one rabbi says no
>>
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>>2781005
What's the cheap CHEAPEST (<$50) way to make and build/assemble a desk that can handle 220lbs~ without bending or snapping.
>>
>>2781072
Go to a thrift store, look for desks that aren't made of shitty chipboard. Or build a frame out of 2x4s and then just find a top for it.
>>
I know it's a bit of a vague question, but how much weight can I reasonably put on the roof of my house? I'm planning to sit there to watch the eclipse and am inviting some friends. Obviously 4~5 would be ok because that's how big the roofing crew was, but would 10 or 15 be ok?

House was built in the late 1950s, so I don't think it has engineered trusses.
>>
I’ve got a live wire (well, the tree of ‘em) hanging around in the basement of the house I bought. It’s not on one of the obvious circuit breakers, so short of shutting the whole house down, can I just put an insulating terminal joint on it while it’s live? As long as I’m careful to really do one at a time and with a VDE screwdriver, I should be good, right? 220V ain’t to bad, but I’d rather not.
>>
I have a three-way light switch and I want to get rid of one of the switches. For the switch I remove, I suspect I cap the ground wire, but then do I connect the hot wire to the neutral wire, the hot wire to the uh traveler wire, or the traveler to the neutral wire? go easy, I'm 'tarded
>>
>>2781206
Is turning the power off for 5 minutes that big of a deal? Do you not get power cuts? I wouldn't do it without an RCD, 220V isn't a fun time.
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>>2781206
Kill the power for the whole house and do it the right way. If you can repair drywall rip it out back to whatever upstream junction box is then leave it exposed like it should be
>>
How do I stop getting stuck in the mud? Can I simply put a couple bags of gravel out there or will the rocks just sink in?
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>>2781228
>get rid of one of the switches

if you peruse this diagram for 10 seconds, it becomes obvious you have to short the common wire to either one of the two
then try it to see whether lamp turns on when switch is up or down
if it's down, short common to the other one instead
>>
>>2781241
Stop allowing the mud. Drainage, nigga. Gravel will just sink in. Get on Jewtube and learn about French drains. A French drain + way more gravel than you're expecting, it'll be well worth it to have a decent driveway that doesn't get muddy or washed out.
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how do I into masonry repair? it seems easy enough, but I'm sure it's not as easy as it looks. ideally I'd like to do it without having to invest in expensive power tools. does anyone know of good books/videos/websites to learn this?

I have an old house, balloon framed, with brick veneer. It might be two layers of brick veneer. at some point they put a cement ("stucco") render over the brick, and it's starting to fall off in some sections. In some cases the bricks look like they completely disintegrated. Others look half broken off. In other areas there are staircase cracks. I could probably spend all summer doing repairs to the walls.

The house, especially in one particular section, is poorly insulated and drafty. I'm wondering if a better long term investment would be to remove the brick veneer entirely, and add insulation on the outside, and then put up some vinyl siding instead.
>>
My GFCI won't reset. The test button felt gummy when I pushed it in and now I'm fucked. I pretty much have to flip every breaker off now before I change this because I can't confirm if I've cut power to it otherwise ? Idk if I want to use a non contacting current detector close to what could be live wires. Or am I retarded.
>>
>>2780981
Mine has been jamming about once a week, and I have to stick a 1/4" allen key in the bottom and wiggle it back and forth to make it work again.
Last time it took a few tries.

Was it hard to replace? It sure seems like I'll have to do mine here in a few weeks. Did you find a tutorial video or something?
>>
>>2781253
>Or am I retarded

too cowardly to be doing men's work.
>>
>>2781253
>Idk if I want to use a non contacting current detector close to what could be live wires.
Isn't that literally what a non-contacting current detector is for though?

>Or am I retarded.
I mean ... there's a ton of simple and (relatively) safe ways to test this.
Buy a cheap volt meter and test it.
Tape a couple wires to a lamp and test the wires at the outlet.
Tap it with a screwdriver and see if it sparks.

IDK man you might just want to call a professional.
>>
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>>2781253
enter the pen tester. also note that a GFCI won't reset without power.

in a pinch you can connect wires to the simple appliance you'd otherwise plug in to test with and while making contact with a white wire, check each black wire by contact with the other wire. connection is an exercise left up to the retard just take care they don't touch each other at either end.

last you can just wire it hot, I can almost guarentee you won't actually die unless you grab all the wires at once and try to shove them up your ass. probably not even then.
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>>2781206
just short them out and then go look which breaker tripped. a U of wire is the poor man's circuit tracer for random outlets when the panel isn't marked
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>>2781284
>Tap it with a screwdriver and see if it sparks.
I heard this makes pretty crystals.
>>
>>2781253
The NCVs are cheap and reliable, there’s circuit breaker tracers too but that gets into it deeper. I would spend the $10 on an NCV, that plus an outlet is far cheaper than calling an electrician. Take the outlet cover off and jam the NCV into the wires, with and without the breaker flipped so you’ve confirmed it works for your own caution and peace of mind. Worst case scenario is you short a wire out and cause a spark and the breaker trips because you flipped the wrong one, or you get a little jump from 120VAC which isn’t the end of the world, just make sure to remove that badass skull ring with the ruby eyes before doing electrical work.

Outlet testers are nice to have as well, you could probably get an NCV and outlet tester for $15 on Amazon.

>>2781278
Aren’t they just clamped to the drain? They’re sort of heavy though which is the only annoying part, supporting the thing while tightening the screw in tight quarters.
>>
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>>2781241
better tires
4x4
lower air pressure in tires
skill issue (be a better driver)
locker or lockers
fwd vehicle
awd vehicle
and last
STOP PARKING IN THE FUCKING MUD
>>
>>2781250
consider that these may be signs of an underlying foundation problem that needs to be addressed.

insulation wise is better to focus on windows doors and gaps before considering a whole house wrap. you'll want to look into an air exchange in addition to sealing.
>>
>>2781284
I hate electrical man. Too much risk of fire hazard and other dumb shit.
>>2781285
Yea I've got one.
>>
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>>2781299
Replacing an outlet is pretty stupid-proof. $10 outlet tester will confirm your work.
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>>2781300
I will give it a shot.
>>
>>2781314
Lots of outlets don’t even require bending the wire and tightening the screw these days, they’re screw or push-in, and the fancy new ones like picrel. Outlet tester will confirm it all. Just make sure your cover plate matches, if not there’s a couple different designs so you can get the correct cover for the outlet you’re installing.
>>
>>2780104
Can you actually do your own plumbing, heating and electrical wiring?
>>
>>2781320
Imma get one that plugs in from the back and then is held in with a screw + plate. Do y'all actually use a torque screwdriver or am I overthinking it...I don't want to go over torque but then I don't want to be under either...
>>
>>2780718
If it was actual linseed based linoleum you would best keep it but it's probably shitty vinyl
>>
>>2781146
Can you do a cross section drawing and give as many measurements as you can? Most important are the size of the beams (Sparren) and the distance between them as well as the distance of those beams that they lie on (Pfetten)
From then it is possible to calculate, here we build with roughly 1.4 overlosd capacity so i think it would be alright for your friends to come, but maybe calculate it, i can give you the formulas if you cannot find them online i can look them up in my books
(These are german words i dont know the english ones right now)
>>
>>2780761
Dunno, but does anyone know much about how living willow fences actually look after 5 or 10 or even longer years? All I can find online are pictures of just completed or maybe only a year or two into use, I was wondering how aggressively they need to be pruned back
>>
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Is this OSB? I want to install hardwood over it. I thought it was 5/8" OSB, but I think these words say "wafer" something something.
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>>2780761
Whats /pit/ i cannot find it
>>
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>>2781337
Side view.
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>>2781337
Looks like OSB but apparently waferboard is a thing...
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>>2781343
I managed to read some more of the text. It says "ANSI A208.1-79" and then "2-MW". This is waferboard.

Every installation manual for hardwood says that the subfloor has to be a minimum of 3/4" OSB or 5/8" plywood. And this is 5/8" waferboard which is like OSB but worse. So I'm iffy about installing hardwood on it.
>>
>>2781331
I can. I have no idea of your capabilities.
>>
>>2781352
I am a master bricklayer and civil engineer, i did sometimes work for an electrician and a inszallations guy but i would not trust myself to just do it off the bat.
How did you learn it? I want to be able to do the 80% or so of work by myself then bring in a pro to just check up on it and greenlight it and start it. How would i go about learning that skill without having to invest an additional 3 years into electritian apprenticeship and 4 years into installer apprenticeship
>>
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Are you allowed to combine neutrals from 2 different circuits together for any reason? I'm trying to get a house ready to sell. As a part of that I was running down what outlets to put GFCIs on. In a couple places, I've found spots where 2 different circuits are run to the same outlet right before the box and they share a neutral down to the box. This might be happening elsewhere in the house because I've seen some weird wire bundles going on.

If it helps answer the question, their breakers aren't connected or even near each other in the box. The hots aren't interconnected. All the breakers are on the right of the box. One of the breakers says 20A and the rest are 15A. The house is about 65 years old.
>>
Ughhh Ughhhhhhh I just took over a position and work and realized all the VFD safety circuits are wired incorrectly. The guy who designed these electrical drawings must have had zero idea what he was doing. The way he drew it up he was using the safety redundancies as expansion units... So we've been cutting the safety rating of these machines by 75%. We haven't had any failures yet but now I need to update all the drawings and rewire about 80 VFDs.
>>
ok I finally ( >>2775126 ) bought/picked up the hardware to fix the closet BUT the old track looks to be 59" while I bought the 60" option online

The box doesnt even fit into the opening - what do?

I havent opened the box in case I have to return them
>>
>>2781369
>How did you learn it?
I just did it. I'm 80 so I'm from a time when people were allowed (and allowed themselves) to do pretty much whatever they wanted.
If it didn't work out, I did it again until I got it right.
>>
>>2781405
that's what hacksaws are for...
>>
>>2781374
>combine neutrals from 2 different circuits together for any reason?

all the neutrals are, in fact, combined at the breaker box, same way as the grounds
further, the neutrals and the grounds are, in turn, joined by a thick wire inside the same box, like 95% of the time
so you can def combine neutrals, especially if all the circuits involved are fairly low current
like lights, entertainment center, computers, and the like
but not kitchen sockets or air-conditioner socket
>>
>>2781405
>BUT the old track looks to be 59"
When you remove the old track a careful examination of the ends will disclose which end they cut off.
If the old track is the same style and in good condition, just reuse it without removing it.
Otherwise, >>2781427
>that's what hacksaws are for...
>>
>>2781405
>what do?

the other dude is absolutely right
there's no harm in cutting off the extra inch
just file it or dremel it after to remove dangerous burrs
>>
>>2781429
This isn't at the box. This is on wires running through the house. I was concerned because I figured that if the neutrals are combined then you wouldn't know what circuits where need to be off to work on any outlets on the combined neutral and that could be dangerous. It wasn't labeled anywhere and I was working on getting the neutrals apart without realizing one of them was connected to a live circuit.

Also I wasn't sure how it would work with how much electricity the wire is expected to handle.

Are you literally just allowed to connect all the neutrals you want together up in the walls? Like treat it all as one neutral?
>>
>>2781427
>>2781430
>>2781431
isnt that dangerous
>>
>>2781444
>isnt that dangerous
For you, probably.
Just let your wife do it. He won't mind.
>>
>>2781445
Theres no need to be a dick bro
>>
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Need to replace this brass pump cylinder on a steel windmill but I don't recognize the thread.
It's a 2.5" tube (od 76 mm) with straight thread and about 15 tpi.
There's cast fittings on either end, one of them is an adapter to normal BSPT, the other holds the foot valve.
Not looking forward to machining this much thread, anybody got ideas what this could be? So I can just buy the right thread cutter?
>>
Woodworking pro bros: I want to varnish mahagony but it has a small dent. Its fine if the varnish cures not perfectly flat. But what I am fraid of is the varnish will get too thick in that dent and it wont cure. I cant use woodputty or epoxy. One it will look bad and two my varnish cant deal with it.
>>
>>2780906
Boiled Linseed oil on a mahagony boat tiller. Purpose is to fill wood fibers so water leaves the thing alone. But since learned its probably not a good idea
>>
>>2781426
I'm 27 and this is what I'm doing. I literally fuck around and then I find out. I also watch a lot of YouTube.
>>
>>2781473
I'm only a dick to pussies.
If you're afraid to use a hacksaw to cut a piece of metal, you need to turn the job over to someone who isn't.
>>
This is a stupid question that doesn't require a separate thread.

I want to repair this knife by brazing it together with a cheap alternative to "ssf-6 silver solder" type of rod.

I'm worried about whether I can get the required heat by a regular blowtorch. My question is how do you measure that there's enough heat (780°c) for the soldering to work? These rods are extremely expensive here and I don't want to half-ass it. Any advice is appreciated.
>>
>>2781704
>a regular blowtorch
gasoline or kerosene?
>>
>>2781704
If you solder a knife at 800 degrees, you're going to lose any temper it has, making it pretty worthless as a knife.
>>
>>2781444
>>2781445
>>2781473
>>2781684
So I met this guy back from afganistan, army grunt ran around in the dirt shooting towelheads for a few years. Big guy 6'2" probably musclefat 280. Did security work sometimes. Anyway something came up and I was like
>just use a dremmel bro
And he was like noo, I don't want to die. Turns out he was deathly afraid of dremmel, like unreasonably so to the point where he wouldn't pick one up. Turns out the boomers from his last job had put the fear of god into him and riled him up until he thought it would explode or chop all his fingers off or idk. he was literally petrified.

A few weeks later I sent him a pic of my mutilated hand - running a dremmel full speed it had skipped into my bare knuckle from the side severing about 0.5mm of skin and nearly making me bleed.

>>2781444
do you know what a hacksaw is? it's slightly less dangerous than your boyfriend's nail file.
>>
>>2781704
>can get the required heat by a regular blowtorch

A larger MAPP torch could do it, but if you know anyone at all who has access to any kind of oxy-fuel torch (acetylene or propane), get them to help.

Practice on some scraps first. Use flux. Don't apply the filler rod until the joint is hot enough to melt it almost immediately. The filler should flow and wick like water, not form globs.

Wrap the blade in a wet towel. You don't want to get it so hot that the heat treat is altered. The metal on the tang near the joint will be softened and more prone to bending from now on, but there's no good fix for that, so you're just going to have to live with it. Attempting to re-harden that part of the blade would create a massive stress riser at the softer brazed joint and make it way more likely to break again. It's not likely to be a problem, anyway, unless you're using the knife to pry on something.

>how do you measure that there's enough heat

~800°C is well into "glowing metal" range. It'll be a dull orange at that point. Again, practice a few times before you try this, and mind how the braze flows into the joint. Make note of the color and shoot for that. It's not that critical, and there's a lot of leeway on temperature here. As long as it's not too cold for the filler to flow properly or so hot the flux burns off, you're good.
>>
Tell me about routers. I have heard that I can buy a drill bit, put it on my drill, and cut holes out of the middle of pieces of wood using just that and nothing else. But whenever I search, I can never find such a thing, and nowhere seems to sell them. What's the secret? Do they have a name I need to be asking for?
>>
>>2781704

Oxy-acetylene is preferable for torch welding or brazing that break. I'd protect the rest of the blade with plumbers/welders heat dam putty (works like protective clay in swordmaking) so as not to draw the temper outside the joint.

bladeforums has many posts on tang repair. I find the custom of tiny tangs fucking stupid in the modern world where the amount of steel is trivially cheap unless one is getting ripped off. Were that mine I'd triple the width of the tang at least. No wonder it snapped.
>>
>>2781514
Put a damn measuring tape next to the threads so we can take an educated guess.
Is there a model number for your windmill or pump?
Would probably be extremely helpful...
>>
I've got mold and soap scum in a shower with glass doors. What's the best way to clean it, with the least effort?
I'm considering paying someone (maybe a cleaning service) and being done with it.
I've scrubbed it for like 5 minutes with a sponge with bleach and water on it, but it only cleans up a little bit before I need to air out the bathroom and have to stop.
>>
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>>2781776
Bleach spray (like Clorox Cleanup) and brushes.
>>
If a oil sight glass doesn't have any markings on it, to what level should I refill?
Very old pump, no manual available.
>>
>>2781787
If there's a sight glass with no mark, you typically fill it to the middle of that sight glass.
>>
>>2781766
God-fucking-dickhole-shitting-damn it. Fuck. My friend who talks a lot of shit, who told me about being able to get a router bit for a drill, was lying and just pretending to be an expert because he's a fucking insecure faggot. Fucking hell. What an asshole. Close to ten years, I have been looking for one of these things, off and on, and no, you cannot put a router bit into a drill. That absolute piece of shit. Dickhead. Fuck.
>>
My company throws away a fuckton of pallets.
I got one from there for the wood, but it kept splintering apart and I only managed to get a couple boards when I was disassembling it with a hammer and nail remover.
I found pallet buster tools online, but are they actually worth the $60+? Anyone use them and actually get the wood intact? Is there a top brand for them?
>>
>>2781788
Thanks a lot.
>>
how do YOU store your LiPo batteries/packs/devices?
i've got enough of these in my bedroom to burn a city block down and idk what to do about it
>>
>>2781806
Calm down, fuck. He might be retarded for not knowing what it is, but the thing you're looking for does exist. It's called a spiral saw or RotoZip.

You can use spiral saw bits in a drill, but it'll probably kind of suck unless you have an unusually high-speed drill.
>>
>>2781833
Under my pillow.
Nights can get cold and they make me nice and warm.
>>
Is it possible to test the vacuum from a pump without a vacuometer? I thought about maybe trying to suck air from a water container and see if it's enough to make the water boil at least, should the pump be able to handle that? It's a rotary vane type.
>>
>>2781812
buy a wonder bar and a cat's paw instead
>>
>>2780104
i cant decide bros...
>one high quality ho
>harem of ratchet hos
>>
Been seeing videos of old lighters pop up here and there and I wanna try making one of my own
Ignoring designs, sourcing, and machining the housing and such, what are the bare minimum components to make a functioning lighter?
>Mechanism to make sparks (ferrocerium + rough metal striker / some circuit that bridges a small gap with electricity, which could also be used as its own lighter)
>Fuel storage (I'm a bit more lost on this one but it's cotton + lighter fluid / butane, not sure if there's anything else out there)
>Fuel delivery (wick that soaks up fuel / tube and valve that opens with a lever, I don't know if the butane gas is naturally pressurized or if it's a byproduct of the construction)
Am I missing anything huge?
>>
>>2781876
>butane gas is naturally pressurized
Everything is naturally pressurized to ambient pressure.
You buy butane as a liquid, it is filled under pressure still as a liquid. It only turns into a gas once you open the valve and it gets out of the tank, at a lower pressure.
>>
>>2781887
Ohh that does make sense, doesn't it. Thank you!
>>
>>2780104
How do I paint a room? Is it as easy as:
>Clean walls with soap and water
>Rough walls with sandpaper
>apply drop cloth to floor
>Apply paint with... brush? Roller?
>Ceiling then walls then trim
what am I missing? that sounds suspiciously easy.
I have lead paint currently several layers deep in Landlord Flat White on shitty apartment ancient plaster/lathe walls
>>
>>2780104
How hard would it be to get some leather and make my own dog collar? Every single one I find on etsy or some other place looks cheap as fuck, I bet I could do better without working with leather before for a fraction of the cost. Where would I even get the leather from? Michael's or some craft store?
>>
>>2781930
Buy a belt that suits your fancy.
Cut to length for dog collar/
Finish cut end for appearance.

profit
>>
>>2781936
Human belts are a bit thick for the dog in question. At least my own belts are. I guess it's a good start, maybe I'll look at children's sized belts. Thanks anonymous.
>>
>>2781938
>Human belts are a bit thick

you must be single
go to a thrift store and you'll see the infinite variety of belt sizes, thicknesses, colors, materials, and shapes
only $3 each
>>
>>2781951
I only ever shop for my own belts, and not usually in a thrift store, those are for books.
>>
>>2781710
I meant something like this.

>>2781728
Thanks, I googled ways on how to fix this and brazing was the most common answer for this. I already promised myself that I'll fix it so there's no alternative to it.

>>2781758
Thanks! That chart and info is all great. I'll try to find someone who has an oxy-fuel torch.

>>2781772
That makes sense to me. The knife was in use in a professional kitchen so it would probably be better to make the tang wider.
>>
>>2780104
I need to make a deep hole on a 4140 steel bar.
The bar is 20mm in diameter and the hole needs to be 12mm in diameter and 20cm in length.
It's sort of like making a gun barrel, but since that's not the intended use I won't need to worry about rifling and such so it should be a bit easier than that.

Now I realize this is a really deep hole and I will need specialized equipment. My question would be what is the cheapest piece of equipment I could buy to make this repeatedly, reliably and easily? It's not about the money, it's more of like I don't want to buy a lathe because it's sort of a shame to buy such an important tool if it's just going to do that one thing.

Wondering about the HP needed for such a task too
>>
Sorry for the poor photo. Original is 6 mb. My lintel is rusting. Is this past the point of no return where I should just get it replaced or is it ok to send it down and paint it
>>
>>2781974
It appears to be sealed around the edges. I'd just wire brush the rust away and treat it with rust treatment chemical of choice then paint it.
>>
>>2781970
A drill press and a few bits. Honestly, it really depends on how precise you need the dimensions. If you need perfect 90 degree angles and 12mm within a thou or two, you'd probably need a mill and a surface pass to square things up.
>>
So an electric motor I have has some threading on the axle for a screw that secures a large fan it spins in there. I think it sucked something it shouldn't or whatever and that screw was bent. I got a new screw to put in and even with the new screw, it still appears slightly bent when I spin it by hand to check. Powering it with no load doesn't create any extreme vibration. Haven't tried powering it with a load.
How perfectly straight and centre does that screw need to be in order not to shake itself apart? Could the threads on the axle themselves have been damaged and bent when the original screw was damaged?
>>
>>2781930
Get

>Speedy stitcher
>Leather punchers (like a fork for making holes for the thread to through)
>Buy real or fake (skai) leather from online store. I got a shit fucking ton from off cut for 10 buckerinos
>>
i live in an old apartment where the windows are wood, and they are getting bad. specially on the side facing the sun, on the lower part of the frame, the wood is completely exposed and what little barnish os left is brittle and flaky.

how hard do i need to scrape/expose the wood before applying a nee coat of barnish? do i need to completely remove it on the parts where the old coat is ok, or only ligthly scrape there and put a thin coat there?
>>
>>2782146
>scrape/expose the wood before applying a nee coat of barnish?

no need to scrape anything
just a bit of steel wool to remove any loose material
then apply several coats of barnish, bhelac, or bolyuretahne
>>
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the dust shield part of the backing plate is rusted out. is it a big deal? one of the sliding pins in the break caliper got stuck. is it because dust got in or just normal wear and tear after 100k miles?
>>
>>2782167
Dust shields are a meme.
Sliding pins getting stuck is NOT a meme. Did you always grease it up a bunch when doing brake jobs?
>>
>>2781522
If the wood is currently unfinished, you can put a damp cloth over the dent then iron it a bit. The steam will enter the wood and cause expansion. Then sand it flat.
If there is a finish already on it you can still try but it likely won't absorb water.
>>
>>2780104
Is there anything else like Gingery's book series but deals with more than pot metal?
>>
>>2781812
Pallets are notoriously poor wood for a reason. If you don't need the full length you might consider just using a jigsaw or circular saw and cutting off the nails. If you're intent on using them make sure you check for any nails or nail parts beforehand and also try to figure out if the wood has been treated with anything potentially dangerous.
>>
>>2782218
Yeah, I did grease them.
>>
Do you think a concrete resurfacer can work over adhesive?

My porch stoop had this ugly green thin carpeting over it and the glue is a fucking nightmare to remove.

I was hoping I could cover it up instead of scrape it all off
>>
>>2782157
>bolyuretahne
I thought that was exclusively for bolly wood,
>>
>>2782260
no, it worgs for any gind of wood. bine, oag, mable, walnud, all gud.
>>
Any drone kits available that could be easy to install as a setup like picrel?
>>
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>>2782270
forgot pic
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>>2781929
You want to wash the walls with sugar soap, not regular soap. You also need to know what your walls are made of; if they're made of plaster you might want to apply a mist coat (although you don't actually have to unless it's brand-new plaster).

Yes, it's very easy to do. Consider putting masking tape over anything you don't want to paint, such as plug sockets.
>>
>>2782245
What have you tried to remove it? You don’t think some goo-gone and a wire brush would do it?
>>
I got some Chinese led sequential turn signals and DRLs for my 93 firebird but they won’t turn on at all. The lights work fine when I tested them with my power supply and the incandescent bulbs get power from the car and work just fine but the leds don’t do anything. I tried cleaning the contacts (not very well) and flipping them around in case I had polarity reversed but it didn’t do anything, should I just keep fucking around with the contacts and polarity next time I try to get them to work or is there something with the leds I don’t know about? Everything I find just talks about the leds making it hyperflash without the right flashers or resistors (mine have resistors) but nothing about no power at all and flashers wouldn’t effect the drl
>>
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Noticed some stank coming from this cabinet. Pic rel is the drain under my "instant" water heater.
Is this a normal set up? It seems like the U bend was fully dried out so all those great sewer odours were coming up through it. I poured some water into it for now.
Anything else I should do?
Stick some bubblewrap around the top to block it off further?
>>
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>>2780188
Switch to ground the ignition. Seems more simple.
>>
>>2782444
Just keep water in it.
Pour something down the drain occasionally.
>>
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do i need to put wood glue on the pegs for my ikea shit?
i have no idea as i have never built or bought ikea shit before
>>
>>2782458
Nay, if you wanna.
>>
>>2782458
No, the pegs are for alignment and screws usually hold it all together.
>>
My crappy silicone shower head has started looking like shit after a year or two. Do they make shower heads out of anything more hard wearing so I can just dunk it in a bucket of bleach to clean it, or do they all have those stupid silicone nozzles that get clogged and degrade?
>>
>>2782458
If the manual tells you to glue it, yes, otherwise, no. Usually for Ikea shit it's "no".
>>2782487
They make ones that are just steel with holes in it.
>>
>>2782440
If you flip the contacts around and the circuits don't have sufficient protection (chinkshit probably doesn't), you can very well burn out the whole thing. Never try "flipping polarity around to test" LEDs, get your multimeter and check polarity with that. Maybe open up the lights and see if you find a blown fuse somewhere.
>>
I bought a house next to a traffic light on a busy road. I didn't realize that I was signing up for hearing "vrroooooom" and rumbling every minute of every day. It's not loud and I can sleep through it but 6 months later it's fucking annoying and grating on my nerves because I'm autistic.
I'm already having the windows replaced with triple pane. What else can I do? Willing to tear down walls, but they're already full of fiberglass (cold climate) and I'm not sure how I could improve on that. Not willing/able to move.
>>
>>2782604
Evergreen bushes for sound reduction if possible.
Sound deadening panels could work as well.
>>
>>2782604
Move to the other side of the house?
>>
>>2780578
Provides on demand pressure. Common in hotels. Faucets aren’t magical portals, you have to pump the water to it and that takes energy, more efficient to pump it to one high location and use gravity to provide the pressure.
>>
>>2782638
>you have to pump the water to it
We pump water to water towers and let gravity do the rest. Putting a little water tower in every home is retarded and way less efficient. I can see the idea for places that can have really high surge demands, like a hotel or condo, or as suggested previously it's for storing potable water in places with lacking infrastructure. >>2780656
>>
>>2782645
> Common in hotels
Learn to read. Nobody’s doing it in houses.
>>
>>2780575
>flex head ratchet is totally worth the exfra money
disagree. it makes the 99% of the time you're using it more complex with the extra joint and floppy head. plus most of the 1% of times it would be useful a box wrench or open end wrench is perfectly fine. as a 3rd or 4th ratchet driver if you are a professional mechanic it's fine, but otherwise you're paying to have a near useless specialty tool lay around for that rare occasion when you could use something else you already have.
>>
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>>2780686
put down aluminum foil until he learns to fuck off. and/or get a spray bottle filled with water to train him. fucking retard the cat isn't going to care about noise unless it's enough to hurt their ears which is just fucking cruel in the first place.
>>
>>2780750
>>2780794
#1 most nasty and impossible to clean up substance. I fucking hate great stuff, it will stain anything and never be the same and that's even if you can get the shit off in the first place. perfect for this application in fact.
>>
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>>2780981
>doing it yourself on the /diy/ board
ISHYGDDT
>>
>>2782652
Learn to read, the conversation started with
>often there are houses/buildings with water tanks in the roofs
>>
>>2782496
Can’t really get the probes onto the contacts. I’ve flipped them around a few times then tested them so if they are getting reversed power from the car they seem fine with it aside from not turning on. The bulb sockets are black and crispy from the incandescent/halogens and they’re filled with very gross looking dielectric grease that I can’t fully clean out, could that be it even though they still worked with the old bulbs?
>>
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>>2782675
the bulb base and socket match? there are multiple 1156 style sockets and bases for example. well 1156 size. if they are the blade style with wire contacts then flipping might not make contact, they are supposed to go in only one way.

if it's a dome light ensure it's turned all the way bright


so
1. add tiny wires, pins and or alligator clips to the car side to extend the contacts.
2. test for + and ground as expected.
3. test the LED from the extended contacts.

Also how are you bench testing the LED, like what is your 12v power source?

Pics as always would help.

ALSO, and probably more relevant, if it's a newer car it might be too smart for it's own good. the problem being the LED draw almost no amps, in something like my old 2000 Jeep Wrangler TJ it meant the vehicle "read" the LED signals as not being present, aka a burned out bulb. The result in a jeep is rapid flashing to indicate a missing/bad bulb. In your case it might just refuse to energize. Easiest way to test this is add your automotive bulb in series with the LED and see if it lights that way, the automotive bulb supplying the necessary resistance.
>>
Some neighbor kids crashed their go-kart into a three-cinderblock-high retaining wall extension next to my house and knocked a hole in it. How do I get the old mortar off the undamaged blocks so I can repair that area, just chip at it with a chisel or something?
>>
>>2782656
Where is expanding sealant used where staining matters?
>>
>>2782678
As far as I can tell the bulb/socket match. From what I can see flipping should still make contact.

Using bench variable power supply to test

Will try to jam some tiny wires into the sockets and test those after it stops raining. Don’t think it’s from the car being too smart it’s an early 90s GM product and these leds have the big resistor hanging out of them so I think it should be drawing enough power
>>
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>>2782687
Forgot pic it’s this kinda socket. Will try to get pics of my burnt grimey sockets and bulb bases when I go back to it
>>
Contractor fags- If i have a sleeper subfloor over a concrete basement, would a moisture barrier be required?

-The 2x4s are treated, outdoor grade lumber
-the 2 inch gap bewteen concrete and plywood is enough for water to evaporate
-There is NO vapor barrier under the slab, so trapping moisture on top of the slab would cause damage to the concrete
-I live in Colorado where the climate is mostly dry outside of rainy months

What would be the issue if i didnt install a moisture barrier?
>>
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I want to cut wood to make boxes with. 1-3cm thick, 6-8cm deep cross cuts. Pine and spruce and maybe something harder/more expensive in the future.
Cuts would be 90° and 45°

I heard japanese saws are good for amateurs. Which kind would be best suited for what I'm trying to do?
>>
Could you smelt a bunch of scrap metal down into a big ugly ingot using a bunch of thermite and just digging a hole in the ground as the crucible? And wouldn't using thermite just end up making you a bunch of iron instead of steel?

Obviously stand far as fuck back, ideally like in a building, while it burns outside since that shit is horrifyingly hot stuff.
>>
>>2782819
>smelt

Since scrap metal is scrap metal and not ore, no, you can't "smelt" it no matter what you do.

>thermite in a hole

I cant imagine this would work well at all, considering all the crap you'd get from the hole itself and the amount of alumina produced by the reaction. Moreover, I can't figure out why you'd want to do this, since the cost of aluminum powder alone would be horrendous compared to the cost of the electricity or fuel needed to melt iron in a regular furnace. I guess the initial expense of that furnace would be the main motivating factor, but, again, the sheer cost of effectively using aluminum as your fuel source would easily end up destroying any kind of savings within a handful of melts.
>>
>>2782830
I have a way to make aluminum powder from a ton of scrap aluminum I already have, although I admit I'm not sure how fine the powder has to be really since I've never actually had a reason to make the stuff and really the aluminum is probably more valuable if I just sell it along with the steel scrap. Mostly I'm wondering if such a silly idea would actually work more than actually planning to do it, since I have a ton of shitty scrap metal laying around and I've been halfway considering options to melt it down to sell/use. It seems like the best option is just gonna be loading it all on a trailer and selling it to a scrapyard for a few bucks.

Also smelting is colloquially a term that can be used for the melting of scrap metals into liquid form to make ingots even if it's not technically a correct use of the word.
>>
I wanna make an at-home pullup bar but there are three things stopping me.
1. I am about 188cm and I dont know how to properly measure a pullup bar to meet my requirements before I buy the materials
2. I don't know what materials to start with or what would be best, I think that maybe polished wood as a bar would feel best on my hands but I wouldn't mind galvanized pipe either I could just wrap cloth around it
3. I dont know where the hell to start with building this stuff and this is my first time on /diy/ so if someone could point me in the right direction if you have better resources here I'd appreciate it and hopefully not waste your time.
>>
>>2782910
oh also im in an apartment with a patio, forgot to mention that so no digging or drilling in the home.
>>
>>2782910
go to the hardware store and look around. galvanized black pipe for gas will have threads on the ends and hardware that are "feet" it screws into, basically discs that are threaded for it. you can use this to build a quick display sign on a table, it would also work for a pullup bar in a doorless doorway- thread the ends on first then screw in place. a door makes it a little more difficult because you have the middle jamb to deal with. depending on where you want to hang the bar you can take pics and ask for more help.

another option is to locate studs in your ceiling and add eyebolts. these are made and rated for weight, and you can attach chains (also weight rated) and a bar.

outside you can erect 4x4s with cement pilings and simply put a pipe through holes.

your height is irrelevant as you are going to be bending your knees. the ceiling chain option allows for adjustment. you can go to many parks and find pullup bars at different heights to experiment with. this will give you an idea about bar height and diameter too.

so last, if you were thinking about building cage for the pullup bar, e.g. a freestanding structure that is a whole thread as you can't just stick two posts on feet and expect them to work like the outside version.

so again start by looking for places in your place to attach something and by visiting gyms and parks to see what you might want to replicate.
>>
>>2782917
drilling is just holes that toothpaste can repair. zero reason not to put some screws in the wall.
>>
>>2782918
I've seen some groid's video on youtube where he says in the comments that the pipe snapped on him at one point but also in the video he didnt have both parts screwed with the whole thing as a unit and he had nothing weighing it down as well.
Would you say the pipe is relatively sturdy?
>>
I did the thing. Look at that new hardware.

Feels good to officially be a DIT Chad. We UP.
>>
>>2782955
*DIY
>>
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does anybody know where i can buy spray paint and primer without metal in it?
i need to paint a box with some radio transmitters in it, but most of the spray paints i've seen have titanium dioxide in them, which worries me because metals might block the radio transmissions.
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For more shower rough in kits is the NPT threads 1/2 inch?

I want to get higher pressure, should I get a 3/4 inch one and run 3/4 inch pex to it?
Are these uncommon or something?

I lived in a place with PEX-B 1/2 inch and the water pressure sucked.
>>
>>2782955
>DIT
Did It Thyself
>>
>>2782986
You can get them in either 1/2" or 3/4" IPS threads, or you can get one with PEX barbs (almost always 1/2")

Whether or not using 3/4" is going to give you more favorable pressure/flow at the shower is going to depend on how the rest of your system is set up. With moderate length runs and no other meaningful restrictions or issues, a 1/2" pex install is fine for most users.

Unless you have a really sprawling house, if there's a problem with flow/pressure then it's because of other restrictions rather than a problem with the run to the shower itself.

I like having decent pressure in the shower, and mine is fine with 1/2" PEX fwiw
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>>2782997
I need something designed, but I don't trust Fiverr. Where can I hire a freelance engineer to see if its possible to make it? Also, will they just make it work in the animation but it wont work in real life?
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I've got badly flaking paint off my mail box. How do I save it? Do I need to remove all of the old flaking shit?
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>>2783025
Yes. Remove it all, sand it, repaint. If you try to paint over over it or anything, it will look like shit and won’t last long.
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>>2782652
>Learn to read. Nobody’s doing it in houses.
https://www.quora.com/Why-do-most-residents-of-Mexico-have-water-tanks-above-their-houses-instead-of-regular-running-water-all-the-time-like-in-America
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>>2782682
>just chip at it with a chisel or something?

Yes,
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>>2782444
>>2782457
In a building where I worked there was a sprinkler utility room in the corner of our office area, with a small drain sink (I think it was used when testing the sprinkler system).

The cleaning crews were supposed to pour a pail of water down it every once in a while to prevent the trap from drying out, but they'd "forget" (for months at a time) and eventually it'd get dry and stink up the place with sewer gasses.
So I used to pour some water down it every few weeks.
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Are those things good enough to put a very flat channel into some Formica tabletop? Doesn’t need to look good, it’ll be hidden and yeah, freehanding it with a small drill will look like shit anyway, but 99% of what I find at Amazon is China-direct (and my local big box store is even worse). But if it’s good enough for occasional uses, I don’t need to spend big for pro grade stuff.
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>>2783533
Formica isn't very hard. Why aren't you just using a circular saw, or even better, a router? You're going to struggle getting a vaguely flat bottom on formica with a drill and a tiny bit. Otherwise, they should work, consider scoring the top or something first and peeling it away so you don't blow out all the edges.
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I'm working on building a tabletop arcade cabinet, but having some issues with the TV. It's a ~2010 Sony LCD. Analog inputs work fine, but the HDMI input won't show a picture. It knows it's getting a signal (it shows 1080i/720p/480p depending on what I connect to it) and various PCs can see the connection to SONYTV or whatever name it shows up as, but all it shows is a black screen.
Time to find a different TV or is this problem familiar to anyone? Model is KDL-32S2010.
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>>2783562
Try several different HDMI cables, in addition to different sources, but it sounds like you may have already. If you have a remote for the TV, you might try a factory reset.
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>>2783566
Already done factory reset. I tried 2 HDMI cables, both worked- are older TVs more sensitive to cheap out of spec cables you think?
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>>2783570
Both worked in other applications I mean
>>
i get constant issues on freecad where it says stupid shit like "03:19:10 <Exception> Geometry2d.cpp(933): Two points are coincident" whenever i try to turn the sketch into a revolution
theres no consistent reason why it does this and its making me lose hours of work because i have to redo my sketches each time it happens trying to figure out what fucking stupid point is causing the error
>>
Can condensation happen even without shower vapor/steam on a waterheater's inlet pipe/fittings/relief pressure valve thing's surface? (electric, mounted on the bathroom wall).

Granted it is humid as shit right now. I thought it was a leak but the moisture is too uniform and there's no water running down anywhere those surfaces just get moist and wet when I run water from the tank (even if I purposely run out of hot water, unplug it and just open the shower on the hot side as a test)
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>>2783554
> Why aren't you just using a circular saw, or even better, a router?
I don’t have a router and I need an 2x10cm “hole” but only 2mm deep. Using a saw didn’t occur to me, but I doubt my hand saw will work for that use.
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>>2783615
For such a small hole, a chisel will probably do the trick just fine. Although you might need to sharpen it, I hear that chipboard stuff is hard on edges due to the glue.
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>>2783605
> Can condensation happen even without shower vapor/steam on a waterheater's inlet pipe/fittings/relief pressure valve thing's surface?
Yes, if there’s enough humidity from other sources…
> Granted it is humid as shit right now.
Oh, well…
Fill some big glass with cold tap water and let it sit. Does condensation form on that?
>>2783620
>chisel
Could kinda work too, but I’ve never used one in particle board, so I’m hesitant to try it out and/or ruin it. I’d rather spend some € on some chinky tools I kinda wanted to have anyways.
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>>2783533
I don’t know if a drill will spin those up fast enough to not be kinda rough. I’ve used those in a dremel with the babby router/plunge cut adapter and they work ok. Or the mini router-type bits with the 1/8” shaft in the dremel.

But those in a drill seems like a headache, you might be better off trying a small chisel,
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>>2783631
Fuck. Didn’t consider the speed. Guess that rules out my neat ‘lil 1500rpm battery drill. But my 3000rpm corded should do for that job.
Or is this one of the cases where China gladly sells you some stuff that 100% physically can’t work?
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>>2783644
I bought picrel off Amazon to do some real small routing. It worked, but I had the higher RPM dremel with the plunge cut base thingy on there so I could keep the bottom of the cut relatively flat. I think keeping the bottom of the channel flat is going to be your biggest challenge with a heavy corded drill and little 1/8” rotary tool bits.
>>
>>2783644
>>2783646
Also remember when you’re routing stuff, remember the bit wants to grab the edge and it’s a but difficult to keep a straight line without some kind of guide. I imagine it’s even worse if you’re using a low rpm and high torque drill.

You don’t have a dremel? Might be worth snagging a cheap $20 knockoff model instead of doing it with a drill. It won’t work as well as an actual router, but should be a lot easier to control. Pretty sure HF sells a cheap Warrior or Drillmaster dremel.
>>
>>2783649
Or, I could try to abrade into the material with some rough blade for my Multitool? Those tend to be meant for mortar and shit, hence it didn’t occur to me, but that should work too.
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>>2783667
Sure, it all depends how big the slot is and how clean you need it to be.

Fwiw, I just tried sticking a dremel 1/8” shank routing bit on my drill. The V-shaped slot on the board was done with a chisel. The mess of sawdust was an attempt with the 2000rpm drill. It is very difficult to control it at all between the weight of the drill and the relatively low RPM with high torque, and you’re going to have a very hard time getting a flat smooth channel because there’s no real depth control and you have the heavy drill pushing down on it. Also the shape of the drill and handle lends to poor control. The rotary tool with those bits is way smoother.
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>>2783667
Can you chisel the thing? Even these cheap ass Stanley chisels make a smoother groove than the drill with rotary tool bit… at least on wood.
>>
>Pic related
Why keep the wrench on right in your inventory when you have two of the wrench on the left?
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I have an old cast iron drain pipe in my upstairs bathroom. it started leaking into the downstairs bathroom from one of the casting seams. I stopped it temporarily with epoxy putty but I’d like to just take it out and replace it with pvc. I’m planning on renovating the upstairs bathroom anyway so I was wondering if it’s as easy as cutting out the old cast iron and replacing 1-1 with the pvc equivalent.
>>
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should i get a stilhl knockoff 36" chainsaw?

Which one shoud i get? thinking the farmac that project farm reviewed. [YouTube] Fake Stihl Chainsaw Better? Let’s Settle This! (embed)

ill mainly use it for cookie cutting and stump quartering

leaning towards the 42" cause why not
thoughts?
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>>2783765
I don't know shit about Stihl or their clones, but I do know enough to say don't buy the 42". If there are 36" and 42" bar options, go with the 36". Big is only nice when you need it, the rest of the time it's just more weight and worse balance making for a less comfy and less fun experience. Big bitches have their place, especially in a professional setting, but "cookie cutting and stump quartering" fuck no, don't spoil the experience.
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>>2783754
For when there’s lack of access in retarded spots. Same reason there’s a few different pipe wrench designs. There’s only one direction you’re supposed to spin the wrench to get the best grip, and sometimes you don’t have clearance for the head or handle if you want to get on a hex fastener correctly
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>>2783772
hmmm is 6" really a big difference?
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>>2783774
16.7% longer, 16.7% worse on your wrists, 16.7% more torque against you at the tip, get tired 16.7% quicker, chainsaw goes 16.7% deeper into your leg, odds to making it back to the truck alive at 16.7% lower.
In all seriousness, yes, 6" really is a big difference when it comes to this shit. It's not just noticeable, it's considerable.
>>
>>2783765
>>2783778
I wouldn’t go fuckhueg either as a “do it all” saw. That knockoff is already a heckin big saw. You can dig the whole bar into trees on smaller saws that still have power, and that extra bar is going to get in the way more than anything when you’re slicing up the typical 8”-18” trees and limbs. If you already have a modest saw and want a big boi when you need to fell some sequoia trees on your property, then go for it, otherwise that’s huge.

I would def spring for a more moderately sized saw that has some power and an optional larger bar for the odd times you need something 30”+.
>>
I've got a doorway that's 56 1/2" wide and 7" thick (deep?). I would like to put a bar across it that can support my weight, for pullups and such. What's the best way to do it?
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>>2783757
>I was wondering if it’s as easy as cutting out the old cast iron and replacing 1-1 with the pvc equivalent.
Yes, if you consider that easy.
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>>2783914
Two of picrelated.
8 screws.
1 length of 1" black iron pipe of suitable length.
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I'm looking into extracting metals from catalytic converters (not a crackhead, grandpa got two shidboxes sitting in his property), but i dont have any kind of chem lab gear in home.
is this more profitable than extracting gold from PC parts?, and second, can i make a profit out of this operation?
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>>2783928
put it back where you "found" it, jamal.
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>>2783807
i have a real stihl 20" its bad ass ..63 81 links
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>>2783925
Thank you stranger
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What product would I use to seal this up where the drywall has come off? I'm getting the window replaced but it takes forever, I just want this sealed from the moisture the shower causes. When the window is replaced I'll get a professional to redo what I'm doing now. I don't want mold forming in places. 90 minute mud and just slather it on? Is mesh tape something I should pick up as well?
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>>2783948
any kind of drywall repair or mud is going to suck up water like a bunch of dry sand. if you were doing it permanently that would be fine, but you'd have to prime and paint and caulk. for temporary get caulk in a squeeze tube and basically rebuild the area with it by removing all the loose holey shit skim coating the board and then caulking all the edges after that is dry. alternatively paint the board after removing all the loose detatched shit, then caulk up the gaps.
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>>2783925
>>2783947
>8 screws.
he meant lag screws aka lag bolts of at least 3" depth
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I wanna get a pair of combination pliers for electrical work around the house (replacing outlets/light switches/installing lights). What size is the most useful? I have small hands if that matters.
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>>2783978
I like the style like pic related. Milwaukee and knipex make a nearly identical unit, and there are cheaper generic brands available too.
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>>2783978
I prefer a medium sized needle nose, aka electrical needle nose or long nose pliers. you don't need big pliers to do house wiring and the long nose are better to pull 30 year old wire nutted bundles out from the back of the gang box. a AA battery screw driver and a wire stripper like Klein Tools 11063W will be far more useful than your pliers. don't forget a small flat blade for all those face plates.
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>>2783997
he's probably not wrong. I've never used those but seems like a good choice. t. >>2783998
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>>2783928
$50 each at your friendly local black market scrapyard. leave the salvage to the afrikkans.
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>>2783765
I hate chainsaws. I've owned a few including a little electric and will take a sawzall any day every day over a chainsaw. They just are not worth maintaining if you're doing anything short of forestry. With a quality blade even a shitty chinese cordless sawzall can take out a moderate sized tree.
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>>2783956
>he meant lag screws
I meant deck screws but if you think he needs lag screws then he needs 2" pipe and flanges instead of one inch.
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>>2783928
Buying and selling them for scrap, not playing with them, is the wise way to make money because the converter functions like a coin or a circuit board.

It is self-authenticating. Buying and selling things for profit with the least labor invested is The Way.
>>
>>2783997
I actually already own a wire stripper so I didn't wanna double up too much tool wise. Do you have a size you prefer (like in inches)? I'm concerned mostly because I have the 10 inch knipex wrench and they're unwieldy AF for me to use.

>>2783998
What's medium exactly? I figured I wouldn't need huge ones for house stuff but I didn't wanna get one that was too small. I have a pair of shitty small pliers right now and they struggle to cut through regular wires. Damn, that wire stripper is so much nicer than what I have. Is the flat blade for prying the plates?
>>
So oblivious me made the mistake of filling my lead-acid battery with distilled water after using all its energy. now it charges faster, and voltage drops and sits around 10.0-10.5 after small usage. is there a way to recover from this?
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>>2784054
drain and refill with battery electrolyte aka sulfuric acid.
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>>2783978
>>2783998
>>2784024
Those Knipex don’t look like they have a great tip. I like more of a needle nose tip on the electrical plier. Klein has these expensive ones with a fat jaw at the end and I always thought those were meh. The black Husky ones in this pic were straight and then I got those new Knipex all in one pliers and they’re expensive but they’re so fucking good. You probably want to go like 7”-8” for general needle nose electrical, 6” is good for smaller work but not for twisting or putting any muscle into or god forbid cutting a screw, and 9”-10” gets into those full size lineman pliers that double as a hammer.

The Milwaukee ones posted above are pretty solid too. Those are 8” I think, maybe 7”
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Anyone know what this style of roof is called?
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>>2784093
C L U S T E R F U C K
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Can you guys recommend a heavy-duty wall mounted power strip? My 15 amp (supposedly) home depot ones keep blowing out and breaking.
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>>2784199
Run a fucking wire and put in a wall socket, nigger.
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>>2784199
buy some version of picrel and make your own
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>>2784220
Or a junction box and an outlet.
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>>2784220
>>2784229
that makes sense, thanks. I should make a couple for my garage.
I currently use a long six socket strip wall mounted at work, and I need some that looks clean and professional.
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>>2784274
something that looks clean****
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>>2784274
>>2784282
You could easily extend some conduit to an outlet box wherever you want it. I did something similar under my work bench. There’s a cubby hole under the stairs where my stubby boi water heater is, and there was a single light fixture like you have in an attic halfway down, and it did nothing but burn the fuck out of you whenever you tried to crawl back there. So I pulled the light socket, put a little box over it, and ran that gay pvc conduit to an outlet box right under the workbench bolted to one of the legs. It’s perfect for plugging stuff in and not having cords lay across the work surface, and I don’t have to run the 15A compressor off a power strip on the second nearest outlet which is connected to a GFCI circuit and the exterior lights
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I have some vintage brass-plated coat hooks where some of the brass got messed up and the underlying steel is rusting. Any ideas on what to use to protect the steel that isn't super toxic or anything? My go-to would be Eezox because it leaves a dry film, but I think it's toxic enough that I don't want it on my actual clothes. Should I just scrub the rusty parts off, leave it as bare metal, and let it ride?
>>
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I'm trying to commit insurance fraud. The adjuster is coming to look at my roof tomorrow. Is there a way I could rough it up to bilk more money out of (((them)))?

>It has to look naturally caused.
>It has to be easily repairable so that I can fix it if the claim falls flat


The roof is like 20 years old and has issues, but I didn't think insurance will cover it unless there's damage besides age.
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>>2784370
Can you grow mold in under 24hrs?

Anything you do right now is going to look brand new, and those people look at roofs and damage all day, so it might be risky. If you ripped off shingles or something, it will probably be obvious that the newly exposed area hasn’t had the sun baking it for months or years.

I mean the upside is they probably won’t go on the roof, the inspectors and adjusters love using drones to avoid the liability.
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>>2784291
Dang, that looks pretty sweet. I'm definitely putting one of those under my workbench. I'm looking at these junction boxes right now. Do you know if they make long horizontal ones instead of 2x2s? I thought maybe I could bend up some sheet metal and weld it; but if they already make something, it'll probably come out cleaner. The only reason I need the strip style is because I'm moving around a table/workstation. Appearance kinda matters because clients can see in, and cable management can sometimes be a mess. High amp draw is from forced air dryers.
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>>2784382
You could easily do picrel if you wanted. I thought about doing a 4 outlet box off mine, but I run a power strip thru a hole in the bench surface for all the little stuff. Maybe one day I upgrade it.
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Need to hook up a washer/dryer stack, but the only 220v outlet I have is for my oven. I was going to buy one of these split things and just make a mental note not to turn on either when one is on, but I don't have access to the breaker panel that controls my apartment so I don't want to fuck it up. Any ideas? Is there a smarter way of doing this? Preferrably I'd like to shut off one plug when the other is on so in case I forget it doesn't trip.
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>>2784399
Hmm, yes yes. Thanks, anon ^_^
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>>2784404
>Is there a smarter way of doing this?
Get your landlord to install the correct outlet for your drier. If that is impossible, build a setup with an actual switch, so it's impossible for both to be active.

Also, driers and stoves tend to not use the same kind of outlet. Those are NEMA 14-50. Dryers tend to have NEMA 14-30
>>
>>2780105
Grab some strong magnets (say from an old HDD), attach them to a spade bit, put into a drill, BRRRRR
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>>2782645
>Putting a little water tower in every home is retarded
That's why Americans do it.
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>>2782722
yes
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>>2782730
>Which kind would be best suited for what I'm trying to do?
A sharp one. For what you're doing, your skill is going to limit your outcome, not the tool.
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>>2783649
Always route with at least one, if not 2, guides.
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>>2780104
I have been tasked to create/modify, either works, a RC car to be gesture controlled.
Would it be easier to modify an existing RC car to move with motion control, or build one from scratch? Why would it be easier/harder?
>>
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>>2784456
My landlord isn't gonna do shit ine way or the other, and I'm fine with that seeing how cheap the rent is for the area. I was just hoping there was an off the shelf solution kinda like pic related (don't really know if an EV designed thing will handle an oven)
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>>2784521
>My landlord isn't gonna do shit ine way or the other
Just use the splitter in your first pic and then when the house burns down you can tell your landlord that at least he saved a couple bucks. Then you can get a haul from your renters insurance and move somewhere else.
>>
>>2784370
Shoot golfballs out of a cannon at it so it looks like hail.
>>
I have a HOLE in my bathroom ceiling picrelated
this hole is there because some roofers were investigating a leak and they took out a chunk to track it down. It seems like the leak was near some drain pipe or something which they said they were "pretty sure" they fixed.
The ceiling is still open to see if the leak is actually fixed by seeing what happens when it rains (i dont know why it couldnt be tested at that point to be sure by just dumping a bucket of water on the roof, i should have asked I guess). I have a flat roof and live in an apt.

I had a question
>Are roofs supposed to be air tight? There is a VERY noticeable draft coming from that hole. How would a roof leak be 'fixed' if its easy for air to get pushed and pulled from the hole?
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>>2784548
forgot pic
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>>2784065
is there any guide for that?
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>>2784548
>>Are roofs supposed to be air tight?
No
Attics are vented to allow trapped hot air out.
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>>2784573
ok, im dumb so please forgive me if im missing something obvious. the roof guy said that above my ceiling is basically just insulation and then its the roof. so there's no "attic" space, outside of the mash of insulation and support wooden beam thingies you seen in the pictures. enough space for a pipe but no big empty attic.

so if its not air tight wont water just seep through where the air is coming from?
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>>2784582
Do you have a flat roof?
>so if its not air tight wont water just seep through where the air is coming from?
Water only moves down. Air moves in any direction.
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>>2784589
>Do you have a flat roof?
yes its a flat roof
>>
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Do you flush your water heater? I have a plumber friend who says it’s a waste of time and money and to leave it be.
>>
>>2784600
Cost pennies, can catch certain problems early, can help limit calcium build-up. I see no downsides really.
>>
I signed a work order for a contractor too soon. I usually get multiple quotes but jumped the gun on this one. Can I back out of it and hold off and get more quotes or is it too late?
>>
How soon after pouring concrete is it okay to get wet? And I mean completely soaked, like submerged in water. I'm pouring deck footings, which are going to be 8-inches thick at the bottom of the hole. The problem is when it rains, the ground becomes soaked and after a heavy rain the entire hole fills with water up to the top. Covering the holes won't do anything because the water seeps in from the ground. It takes several days to completely dry out.
It's going to rain starting tomorrow morning. If I have concrete poured tonight, will ~12 hours be enough time for the concrete to not be fucked if it gets basically submerged in water and stays underwater for several days?
And I assume I shouldn't pour concrete if there's still water in the holes, but is it okay to pour if the holes are just a bit muddy with maybe small puddles?
>>
This is some white people shit not playing
>>
>>2784754
Not your personal army.
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>>2784756
Shut the fuck up cracker. Who said I need an army? Cunt faggot bitch.
>>
>>2784748
concrete cures under water it just takes longer. you can displace the water in the holes with wet cement but I'd probably shopvac each right before pouring if I had to.
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>>2784600
>sub 10 minutes
>greatly increases life of water heater
your plumber fren is a faggot
>>
>>2784582
so most roofs have vents on the eves, you know the underside where it's flat. for vents, like a bathroom ceiling vent they connect to a roof vent which is a sealed pipe that is either open ended or has a cap, neither of which go into the roof space. if water is getting in then there is something wrong with your roof, for a flat roof it's either the edges or flashing is missing around such a vent. roofs with attic space are meant to be cold in winter hot in summer, e.g. not insulated from the outside. your roof is probably not meant to be like that, but that doesn't mean it needs to be air tight. that hole looks like there was a bathroom vent fan that was slightly misaligned and ripped out. it looks like there is a tube, the bottom of a vent stack for the exhaust fan. regardless if it's leaking somewhere that's a problem, if it's not leaking then water isn't a problem. oh also if it's cold in the joist area in the ceiling a hot shower would cause condensation on the cold surfaces which is not a leak but a problem of the gaping hole.
>>
>>2784748
Water is what causes the reaction that cures concrete. You can pour directly underwater if you're so inclined, the Romans were famous for it. >>2784780 It is absolutely not slower underwater, unless the water happens to be extremely cold but that's a whole other thing. Curing underwater actually improves the strength of the concrete, you get a more complete reaction without exposure to air. Don't worry about your rain, be thankful for it and know it may actually give your shit a boost compared to doing it in the dry.
>>
>>2784800
>>2784780
Any problem with pouring it on top of very soft muddy soil? A couple of the holes still have trace amounts of water and the soil is very very muddy at the bottom, like basically the same consistency you'd get at the bottom of a lake. I've heard not to pour concrete when the soil is muddy like that.
>>
>>2784804
That can be a problem, if the ground can compress, displace, or wash out. While you can throw concrete right over it, if the ground is too "spongey" and soft and hasn't been compressed, it may not support it when it's cured. It could also cure beautifully and appear fine, but have a disappointingly brief lifespan. The ground can be soaking wet, what matters is that it's compacted. Wet, sticky, spongey mud likely isn't well compressed. Depending on what you're making, and how persistent these conditions are, you may consider piling. It's not terribly difficult, but it does mean more equipment, more material, and more time.
>>
About to make my first floor plan for a small location.
Any tips outside the obvious?
Seems simple, just he dimensions and doors/windows. Maybe also the A/C disposal/electrical outlet.
>>
>>2784521
It says on the box : NEC safe charging maximum: 24A. Your oven probably wants a lot more then that.
>>
>>2784812
>what you're making
I'm making a deck. The bottom will dry out eventually, but it takes over a week after it rains to dry and we're getting more rain tomorrow and probably next week. This is the driest the hole has been for a month and it's the driest it will be for the foreseeable future, until we get a summer drought.
What if I put gravel or something in the bottom before pouring concrete would that help?
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>>2784824
>What if I put gravel or something in the bottom before pouring concrete would that help?
Not in any significant way. Sorry my negro, I'd recommend tilling/turning the soil with a hoe or similar to break it up loose, this lets bulk water drain out of it and helps it to air dry a little bit, then compact it down with a rented plate compactor or jumping jack. More work, but it'll be worth it.
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>>2784604
Short answer : yes
Longer answer : if the contractor is a dick they are going to hold you to your contract. But most contractors I know are over worked and would be glad to put off a job.
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>>2784754
Go and be stupid somewhere else
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>>2784817
>Any tips outside the obvious?
Yes!
It SHOULD be obvious, but don't ever put the doors to both Glory Hole rooms right next to each other.
You don't want your customer to walk out of the Glory Hole room and accidentally make eye contact with the dude who was just blowing him.
It ruins the whole mystique.

Otherwise, just make sure you do your standard obvious things like wheelchair accessibility and add "fluid drains" in every video booth. Your cleaning crew will thank you!
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I’ve recently been noticing a shit smell around my house. At first I was worried it was a septic tank issue since I know it’s been 10+ years since it was pumped, but there are no signs of leakage or any other issue with it. What could be causing the smell? It seems to be stronger on hot days
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>>2784845
Sewer gas coming up a drain? Do you notice is near a certain sink or bathroom?
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>>2784836
Are glory holes actually a thing outside of porn?
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>>2784856
Yes. Sexual deviance is very real.
>>
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I need a mortar bed to set my bathtub.

Which mortar do I use?
I need a mortar that doesn't shrink.

I keep seeing contradictory things online.
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Plumbing problem:
There is a clog between A and B. A is old terracotta pipe, B is PVC. I ran a snake up and down to little effect, but I did notice after a bit that what did flow down was muddy water. The PVC pipe was installed in the winter, and we got a huge amount of rain a few days before the problem started, I'm guessing muddy water seeped into the gap between the pipes.
My plan is to run a (figuratively) shitty hose into B towards A and spray the mud until shit starts flowing freely.
Can anyone see any flaw in my plan?
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>>2785050
should be fine
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Has anyone here ever used one of these things? Do you know if they'd be able to handle being fluttered open and closed at 25Hz?
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>>2785109
>able to handle being fluttered open and closed at 25Hz?
It opens and closes automatically as the fan runs and shuts off.
The inertia of the fan blade and motor won't allow it to stop and start 25 times in a second.
The inertia and wind resistance of the slats would cause similar problems.
In other words, NO
(credit given for a really stupid question though)
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>>2785109
>25Hz
Where is this a standard?
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>>2785394
>where is this standard
lol. lmao.
>>2785194
>It opens and closes automatically
is this closing mechanism powered, or are they just flaps hanging in the breeze? The reason I ask is there's some cool sub-frequency audio shit you could do with something like this (25Hz was too high as I'm realising, but would they be able to handle 10Hz?)
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>>2785467
>are they just flaps hanging in the breeze?
They are just hinged so the wind from the fan 'blows' them open.
When the fan shuts down the airflow stops and the shutters fall closed.
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>>2785473
Perfect, thank you
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>>2785475
The rivets you see in the middle of each slat are to attach an arm to the slat.
The arms of all the slats connect to the rod in the center.
This ensures all slats open together by the same amount.
Those slats closer to the center assisted the ones one the top and bottom which don't receive the same airflow as the center ones.

Just letting you know their operation is tied together.
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>>2785109
>handle being fluttered open and closed at 25Hz?

piece of cake
variable speed dc motor, maybe an old drill with a dead battery, set at 25 RPM
cam made from some scrap metal
arm that attaches cam to one (or all) louvers
viola!
done!
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>>2785635
>25Hz?
>>2785635
>25 RPM

cycles per second ≠ revolutions per minute
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>>2785635
At least you posted that in a dead thread so not too many will see how ignorant you are.
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>>2784845
Or washing machine. Some sink that is never used. Dry pipes.
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>>2784600
I just did first in 20 years.nothing came out.
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>>2784364
Gun blue
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>>2781348
Do you know your joist spacing and nailing pattern for the floor? Do you have a link to a PDF of the hardwood installation manual?
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>>2781348
>So I'm iffy about installing hardwood on it.
Don't. Do it properly.



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