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/diy/ - Do It Yourself


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It's just some pretentious baguette styling, aint't it? Compound all the angles, and boolean the resulting components based on what stock you have available. It wouldn't be a thing if they had CAD in 1300s.

Or am I missing something?
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>>2800359
>It's just some pretentious baguette styling, aint't it?
>Or am I missing something?

Yeah, you're missing a brain.
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Looks neat though
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>>2800359
That looks really nice
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>>2800359
>It wouldn't be a thing if they had CAD in 1300s.
crazy thing is if you did it today it would be 50 sheets of ply glued together and then cncd and it would cost about a hundred times more than paying a master joiner to build it like they did back then.
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>>2800359
OP is the kind of person who gives us the shit architecture we have today. I bet he's great at standardized testing.
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>>2800359
Looks nice, but I can just imagine hundreds of spiders in there hanging over the doorway.
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>>2801259
How is the curved wood done? Steam and force?
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>>2801372
Did not mean to quote
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>>2801372
I did not manage to find any information on the French internet. This kind of oeuvre is called a guitarde and every Compagnon carpenter used to make one when settling.
The curved wood is called a "croche" and that's pretty much everything I've found.
pic related took 7 years (2500h) to make
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>>2801581
Amazing, but there is no info on how a thick beam of wood can be curved and stay that way? I am no carpenter.
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>>2801631
look into boat building. Think they find bent bit of wood and wet it, maybe burn it. or it's carved
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>>2801372
There's a guy named Patrick Moore who does this. I'm pretty sure he's got a book.
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>>2801372
they just pick the warped boards at home depot
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>>2800511
Not op here.

Architecture today is shit.

>be modern architecture
>atheticly bland
>not of any time or place
>built poorly
>rots after 20-30 years

>Be medieval architecture
>athericly inspiring
>history behind it
>functionality perfectly meshed with form
>has lasted 1000's of years
>will last 1000nd's more
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>>2801259
use a broom once in a while anon. anyone with a covered porch deals with this.
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>>2802408
Survivorship bias is a helluva drug.
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>>2804541
Claiming survivorship bias might make sense if we were talking about machinery, but I can pull up pictures of entire cities in Europe that look exactly as they did in paintings from 1000 years ago. A medieval building is far more likely to be destroyed by communists or carpet bombing than by forces of nature.
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>>2804550
>destroyed by communists and carpet bombings
And :clap: that's :clap: a :clap: GOOD
:clap: thing :clap:
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>>2800511
If you're bad at standardized testing you are unironically retarded. You are literally fed the answers, how can you possibly fuck it up?
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>>2800359
Looks awful outdoors.
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>>2801581
>>2801631
>>2801655

In the olden days extremely curved and recurved structural timbers like these were hewn from tree sections that had the basic shape needed. In some cases trees would be artificially twisted to grow in certain directions to create timbers for planned projects like ship ribs and stems and for generic structural shapes like korbels and knees and similar brackets.

Very complex curves over spans would also be assembled from multiple pieces using typical joinery and more braces to to support weak spots, which is part of why compound curves like these have elaborate web- like arrangements of elements to support and redirect/ redistribute loads.

People still make rustic furniture this way, but it's rare to see "grown" parts finished square anymore, outside of historic renovation of older structures and ships.

The French word croche is more than likely related to "crochet" which among other definitions means "hook" or "bracket"...also worth noting that in English the parts of trees where branches exit trunks and form the kinds of curved or hooked shapes conducive to cutting these kinds of parts are referred to as a "crotch". Note in picrel that some of the parts correspond perfectly to this concept.
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>>2800510
Only if it was some youtube hack retard sponsored by plywood and CNC manufacturers...

Since the advent of structural adhesives these kinds of wooden structural timbers are laminated from multiple strips of material thin enough to bend either naturally or with the help of steam.
Parts made this way are far more stable than natural lumber and can achieve the same load bearing capabilities at smaller sizes. They also waste less material and allow the use of the good parts of fatally flawed timbers that are only revealed upon milling.

Even before the days of laminating carpenters were substituting layers of thinner lumber to make up the bulk needed for structural members, rather than make them out of solid lumber...the latter is the worst way to do it when it comes to effort and risk of having to abandon a part, and as soon as people figured out how to avoid it they stopped.
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>>2804550
>has lasted 1000's of years

How convenient that you get to hold modern architecture to the same standard after far less than two centuries even if you use the most expansive sense of "modern architecture" to look for examples.

>will last 1000nd's more

How even more convenient that you can just pull this out of your ass with zero need to ever be held to account....the same way youll never have to be judged on your ignorant insinuation that well cared for and periodically rehabilitated modern architecture can't last indefinitely.
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>>2802408
>>medieval architecture
>>has lasted 1000's of years
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>>2806887
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>>2807319
I'd rather be that guy than the moron who can't fit the circle in the circle hole and copes about how the circle is just standardized Jewishness.
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>>2807017
Some variations of woodworkers still twist trees like that
t. fag growing birch in weird shapes
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OP here, Stereotomy is a overloaded term that refers to three related things: the style, the science, and also a type of insane 2D diagram that these fuckers use.

There is no denying that it looks beautiful, where it goes down hill is the science. The science honestly is not useful for modern engineering, its so out of date it can't be used for anything load bearing without insane finite element calculation. It's strong in the same way generative designs are strong, except that calculating exactly how much is a nightmare and basically only possible in simulation. You couldn't use this style to make a modern house, not because it's not good enough but because it's impossible to say it's up to building code.

The science of Stereotomy does appear to still have some modern relevance when it comes to working with this from a design perspective. I tried to make some stuff in this style in CAD, and working with projected curves is pretty hard mode when there are so many involved. Let alone modelling the joinery. Maybe I'm just not using the right CAD tools, but my go-to package is horrible for this kind of design work.

What absolutely shits me though is the gatekeepy- ness of anyone teaching it. Every conversation they have to remind you that in the 1300s you used to have to commit your life to a guild to learn the techniques, and how special it is offered to you. You basically can't even get your foot in the door to learn the absolute basics without committing to a 3 month course. I'm still going to try, but just don't have time to commit to some remote learning thing. Give me some books, ya know. I would absolutely love to write some CAM to make this at scale without all the manual labour. Legit make myself a mini castle out in the country.

Any way, take everything I said with a massive grain of salt. I'm no architect, and not even this kind of engineer.

Pic is of a trestle done in the Stereotomy diagram method.
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>>2801581
Amateur Timber framer here. I'm pretty sure they used trees that were already curved.

If you carve Timber into curves they go across grain boundaries and that would weaken the structure. You want continuous runs of the grain from one end to the other.

Y>>2801655
For boats you generally do steam bending of planks. My neighbor who was my elementary school principal built one on his property like this and for two years I helped him part-time when he was doing these. He built a gigantic Steam Box about 25 ft long and then insulated it with fiberglass insulation and then wrapped it in plastic to keep it weathered tight because it was going to be out side without cover
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>>2807022
Glued laminations like these are pretty common for industrial commercial spaces here in canada. A guy I know did this for the Kay Meek center in West Vancouver.

Picture related
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>>2807859
As much as I like these sort of diagrams, I've never really felt a need for them. I've got really good ideas of how to visualize stuff as I build them. I want the only ideas or something like this that I would actually put down on paper or the angles



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