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How's that GDPR compliance coming along, Anon? You DO remember that beginning with May 25 it comes into effect, right?
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>>65963033
I have a court order to forget.
>>
I really hope some adtech company gets hit with an enormous fine and pushed into liquidation, just to watch all those marketing fucks piss their pants
>>
It's helped me unsubscribe from all my junk I signed up for years ago.
>>
No worries, I take no data from visitors
>>65963065
This
>>
25th? I won't be done by this week, but prob done early next.
>>
>>65963033
>disclaimer:
>this site is private property. By entering you agree that any eu and/or privacy laws do not apply to you on this site.
>agree
>gtfo
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>>65963393
Nice try murrifat but this won’t work, you will be fined or banned from doing business in one of the world’s biggest economic area.
>>
>>65963033
My company was ready half a year ago.

>>65963065
this so hard
>>
>>65963033
Breddy gud, GDPR isn't really an IT thing, it's an HR and compliance thing where IT helps with the execution. Have fun with selective delete requests if you're using physical backup media though.
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>>65963393
You specifically can't waiver your rights under GDPR, sweetie.
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>>65963393
Yeah no, as others have said that doesn't work in the EU.
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>>65963393
>am I being detained?
>>
This >>65963065, and this >>65963065, oh, and this >>65963555.
>>
Still waiting for an answer from my hoster on what data they collect.
>>
Thank you based EU
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>>65963033
What's that? Give me a quick rundown. Will this shit affect me if i am not in EU?
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>>65963925
If you're not in a cuck country, every website that has your email address has to email you and ask you if you still want to be in their systems.
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>>65963727
kek
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>>65963033
GDPR is part of a reason why I quit my job, I applied for a low stress helpdesk job but the other IT guys quit 2 months ago and now I'm in charge of all the data and user accounts, they didn't even up my pay, I'm still paid less than regular data entry people... the company I work in serves over 200 thousand clients. We're utterly unprepared for GDPR. We have hundreds of gigabytes of emails, documents, personal information and other data stored locally and on outsourced servers. No encryption on people's business laptops, no BIOS passwords, other GDPR guidelines are also unfulfilled. It's going to be a fucking nightmare. Our ERP system provider doesn't allow account deletion and full data wipe and people are already sending questions on how to erase their data from our servers. We store every scanned and printed document in unencrypted image format... I'm not paid enough to clean all this shit up but I'm trying hard anyway, yet my fucking superiors had the audacity to tell me I don't care to do my job right. Stopped giving a shit since then.

We don't have any HR or GDPR-oriented specialists hired full-time so we're basically fucked. Hopefully when I'm out and they don't find anyone to take my place they'll realize how much work I was doing for basically free. Once 30th of May hits I'm out of there, thank fuck. Hope they get hit by GDPR hard. Sorry for the blog post.
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>>65963033
>>65963478
Fuck EU customers. Bunch of morons. Always whining about customs.
It's not my fault that your gov't rips you off and
>vat + customs can equal over 25% of value
>Royal Mail charges 7.50 processing fee
American and Canadian market are big enough.
Only France, Germs and UK shop in USA anyway, rest of Euros are too poor.
>>
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According to /g/ GDPR is the end of the internet. Plus burgers seem to think you can actually waive your rights via EULA which is incorrect.
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>>65965134
MIght be incorrect, but how is EU planning on enforcing it's laws outside of EU?
You come to buy shit to my shop, which is an extension of my country, you play by my rules and laws of my country.
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>>65965134
You cannot waive your rights but you can absolutely tell them that if they are European they are not allowed to browse your website. It's the same thing that porn sites do, they don't ask for a real id they just ask if you're over 18
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>>65963033
>GDPR compliance
can you give me a quick rundown?
>>
>>65965365
It depends on each country. If you live in America your government will cooperate with the European authorities, but I would assume if you live in China they won't give a fuck.
>>
Wonder if this thread will get moved to /pol/ too.
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>>65965365
>which is an extension of my country, you play by my rules and laws of my country.
Not how it works, sweetie.
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>>65965414
Why would it? Are kikemods interfering with topical threads again?
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>>65965382
"User" = european whether living in yurop or just having multiple nationalities
>Ask users for consent to keep their data
>if under 16, ask for their parent's email address and ask them for consent
>Explicitly tell them everything their data is going to be used for
>If they ask to be removed from your database you have to comply
>If they ask to see what data you have about them you have 30 days to give them everything you have about them

That's the gist of it. There are more regulations when it comes to business, videotaped data and so on. But for most people that's about it
>>
>>65963938
And what if they don't receive a reply? I deleted my old email addresses.
>>
>>65965435
Forgot one thing
>You have to encrypt every database record
No more storing emails, names, anything in plain text. Treat all data as if it were a password or credit card number
>>
>>65963033
All my projects were ready for it before I even finished the "what is (projectname)" file
>>
>>65965435
So what's the big deal? Seems like it's only a pain if they've been unnecessarily sloppy with data in the past.
>>
>>65965454

Its triggering companies who are selling your info without your consent. Given this means megabux burgers are rushing to defend their corporate overlords.
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>>65965454
The big deal is that most business are extremely sloppy when it comes to data management. And like I said, there are some more regulations when it comes to bigger companies.
If you have a web app or two like me and you were careful when designing your database it's pretty simple to comply. Just encrypt everything and tell users if you're using their data for anything.
>>
>>65965447

By default they can't - you have to explicitly give permission.
>>
Good think my company is incorporated in Hong Kong :^)
>>
>>65965454
Look at this guy >>65964254
Lots of companies are like that, they store user data in different repositories, and everything in plaintext. So becoming GDPR compliant becomes a huge headache.

The biggest problem though, is that they waited until the last minute. The EU gave everyone two years to become compliant. GDPR is actually pretty old, but because it wasn't being enforced nobody cared.
>>
>>65965490
too bad so sad

there are no companies that have data on me that i need them to keep

maybe they should just delete it all and start over :^)
>>
>>65965484
Well, I haven't logged into Steam in a while and I haven't received any email in my main inbox.
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>>65965515
Are you european though? if you aren't they'll tell you to fuck off
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>>65965365
>In Poland/Germany/GB you come to a coffee shop in which is an extension of Holland, you can smoke weed here :^)
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>>65965516
well there's still 9 days until it's enforced and then there's a grace period of like three months
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>>65965530
>if you come onto my website for a company based in the usa to buy my freedomsticks i'll sell your data to whoever i want
>>
bad news for crackers, now encryption will be enforced, no more billion dollar companies storing passwords in plain text or with md5
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>>65965554
Hey! Now i get it, it is kinda like with muslims in (post-1945 so lowercase) germany
>I come to your country so you have to do sharia law, nigger :^)
>>
>>65965564
>will be enforced
lol nope, the EU has no power over my company
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>>65965003
>the entirety of the EU only makes use of the US market and US websites through purchasing physical products that need to be shipped.
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>>65963393
won't work dumbass
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>bunch of companies goes out of business due to this

can't wait senpai
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>>65965371
would this actually work? it seems too simple of a solution
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>>65965820
Some websites will try it, I’m thinking there’s going to be some legal battles coming in the next few months
>>
>>65965820
just IP rangeban, no problem for anyone moderately competent


no one has the right to browse your website
>>
>>65965618
of course they don't, you don't have a company :)
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>>65965835
IP rangeban doesn't work with europeans living abroad. Maybe try using your brain once in a while
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>>65965873
If they live abroad then it doesn't matter since they no longer fall under EU protection laws
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>>65965867
Whatever helps you sleep at night bb. Just know your information is being sold to the highest bidder as we speak, the EU can't help you :)
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>>65965899
that's not how it works
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>>65965912
that is quite literally how it works. the eu cannot enforce the law outside of the eu on non eu entities
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>>65965907
you don't sell product or information :)
you don't even pay for your own food :)
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>>65965918
i hate that i share this website with people as ignorant as you
>>
>>65965899
>With less than a year to go until the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) takes effect in May 2018, many Australian companies are still a long way from complying with laws obligating them to protect personal data relating to European Union citizens.

>The majority, in fact, believe – erroneously – that they have no obligations under the GDPR, which EU regulators have explicitly said does apply in countries outside the EU

https://www.cso.com.au/article/626299/australia-filled-eu-citizens-will-meet-your-gdpr-obligations-them/
>>
>>65965954
then dispel my ignornace, sweaty

>>65965964
>posts a link with no evidence
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>>65965978
Oh sweetie sweetie, sweetie. just shut the fuck up buttercup.
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>>65963033
FUCK Europe.
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>>65966010
it's a meme you dip
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>>65966019
Why do Americans get so triggered when they are forced to store private data with care? Literally just downloa a library and encrypt your database. It’s not rocket science.
Or is it the fact that you can’t sell your users’ data that triggers you? That would make no sense because there’s no way in hell your website has enough users that selling their data would be profitable
>>
>>65965926
With all those bootyblasted passive-aggressive smileys, you must be pretty upset with how toothless the GDPR is. Just don't be surprised when my company is in the news for continuing to sell your information, and nothing happens because of it
:)
>>
>>65966044
Americans cannot mentally proces the idea of a corporation not being allowed to dry anally rape them whenever it wants. Their country was built on that idea. Whenever threatening regulation is on the horizon US corporations literally just buy the congressmen to vote it down
>>
God I fucking love seeing butthurt burgers sperging out.
>>
tl;dr
EU wants everyone to send a rep to physically reside in the EU so the GDPR can be applied to them, because it otherwise does not, since said company does not reside in the EU and thus does not fall under their laws.

You will not find an article providing evidence that the GDPR applies to US based companies, or any company outside of the EU because it does not- the legislation itself even admits that, and as part of the legislation, there is language saying that methods to extract fines from non-complying foreign companies must be developed, as they currently do not exist.

The only way for the GDPR to apply to a foreign company is if the country where that company resides passes a law or other regulation that levies the fine by proxy for the EU.



(1) In relation to third countries and international organisations, the Commission and supervisory authorities shall take appropriate steps to:

a) develop international cooperation mechanisms to facilitate the effective enforcement of legislation for the protection of personal data;

b) provide international mutual assistance in the enforcement of legislation for the protection of personal data, including through notification, complaint referral, investigative assistance and information exchange, subject to appropriate safeguards for the protection of personal data and other fundamental rights and freedoms;

c) engage relevant stakeholders in discussion and activities aimed at furthering international cooperation in the enforcement of legislation for the protection of personal data;

d) promote the exchange and documentation of personal data protection legislation and practice, including on jurisdictional conflicts with third countries.


Just because some pissant kike passes a law that says then entire globe must do something doesn't make it true nor enforceable.
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>>65966044
>eu tries to pass a law over american citizens
>>>>oy vey goyim y wont u store data securely stop holocausting my testicles
>>
>>65966067
This, and whenever you point it out, they start blabbing about "hurr durr it's corporations vs state, the state is evil" revealing their lolbertarian powerlevel.
Lots of governments do shady shit, that's no secret, but that doesn't mean corporations should be above the law.
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>>65966044
You are either a terrorist or a pedophile. If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear.
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>>65963478
Inshallah the largest kasbah on earth!
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>>65966083
it doesn't matter if you reside in the EU as long as you do business there, you are subject to fines

2. This Regulation applies to the processing of personal data of data subjects who are in the Union by a controller or processing not established in the Union, where the processing activities are related to:

a. the offering of goods or services, irrespective of whether a payment of the data subject is required, to such data subjects in the Union; or

b. the monitoring of their behaviour as far as their behaviour takes place within the Union.
>>
>>65966103
Post email+password.
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>>65966120
it doesn't matter, EU laws cannot apply to the US, or US citizens outside of the EU. Period. Full stop.


How are you failing to understand that US property in the US does not fall under EU law?
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>>65966132
>EU laws cannot apply to the US
of course not. But it applies to US companies doing business in the EU. Is this difficult to grasp? Do you think if a French company sells shit in the US then US laws don't apply to it?
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>>65966146
good luck suing an american company under eu laws
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>>65966160
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Corp_v_Commission
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/jun/27/google-braces-for-record-breaking-1bn-fine-from-eu
>>
>>65966146
>But it applies to US companies doing business in the EU
Only because they have an EU presence. A French company that sells tablecloths doesn't suddenly come under US law because they get an order from an American

t. American who imports stuff from Europe
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>>65966173
what do you consider "presence"?
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>>65966146
>Do you think if a French company sells shit in the US then US laws don't apply to it?
Yes?
Obviously the sales taking place in the US are done by US rules or not at all, but selling things in the US doesn't suddenly bind the company by all of the US's laws. A company in a country where child slavery is legal can still legally sell things in the US (though the US can choose not to buy from them). Likewise, the EU can't do anything to enforce their laws on outside companies. The best they can do is threaten to block access to the site within the EU, and they aren't going to bother with that for all but the absolute largest players.
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>>65966190
so I can buy a child slave from that company and import it to the US?
>>
>>65966188
You'd have to ask the EU. But it probably involves things like physical offices or server farms.

It will absolutely never include companies like mine with a web presence and operation wholly within the . The EU can block me if they want, international shipping is shitty anyway
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>>65966124
Strawman
>>
>>65966214
yes, up until the kid actually reaches america and falls under american jurisdiction

look at asian massage parlors my dude
>>
>>65966168
1. Microsoft has business agreements with EU corporations to sell/bundle software in the EU. That's not at all comparable to hosting a website in the US that allows anyone to connect. Unless you're saying the EU will institute site blocking for websites that don't comply (would be a completely unparalleled act of censorship), the two situations are incomparable
2. They didn't sue Google US, they sued Google's European subsidiary, if that didn't exist the EU couldn't sue them
>>
>>65964254
this is how all companies are more or less, most important is how well they put up an appearance which is mostly lawyer fees and some front end work.
>>
Subway sent me an email begging me to allow them to keep my user data. How could I ever say no to you subway.
>>
>>65966240
Why does subway even have your data?
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>>65966236
>falls under american jurisdiction
well my information is already under EU jurisdiction
>>
>>65963033
I wonder how much will hirohito manage to fuck up the site trying to make the site gdpr compliant
>>
>>65966214
Yes, you can.
And then you will be arrested because you live in the US and what you purchased is illegal there.

The company will be fine.
>>
>>65966111
>whiter than you Muhammed
>trips
Fucking burgers and your repeating digits.
>>
>>65965134
GDPR won't change much, but it's a step in the right direction.

>>65965365
>>65966083
>>65966132
The issue is that "the internet" isn't a country. The whole point of it was to make a worldwide network that would follow the same rules, with the exception of local clusters. So if you're on WWW it should be expected that you follow laws of the WWW. The only alternative is actual site censorship and IP range bans.
>>
>>65966252
>my information is already under EU jurisdiction
Too bad the company handling it isn't. Have fun taking information to court
>>
>conservative poltards actually believe gdpr is a bad thing
how does that corporate cock taste?
>>
>>65966249
They have this bonus system that lets you collect points for everything you buy. After 20 subs or so you get one for free.
>>
>>65966232
Thank you for admitting, by your own logic, that you use email to plan terrorist attacks and trade child pornography.
>>
>>65966237
You do understand that if there wasn't google euro, google couldn't do business inside europe (without complying to the Euro laws)

They'd be giving up on european market and they aren't that crazy since it's bigger than the US market.

In case of lack of google anyway, another search engine will pop up.

Yandex is already google tier pretty much in search terms.

Bing is even better in pictures.
>>
>>65963033
block all eu ips
put disclaimer (tell it's against ToS) you can't use the site if sandpeople from eu
???
profit
>>
>>65966285
>conservative poltards
I am an unironic fascist, but I believe GDPR is mostly a good thing.
>>
So this compliance only allows to Europeans?
When does it come to America? I want to force companies to not retain my data too.
>>
>>65963033
comply with this!
*unzips dick*
>>
>>65966295
>Yandex is already google tier pretty much in search terms.
It's not. Its image search is leagues better.
>>
>>65965618
Then you don't do business within the EU and making sure you don't becomes your responsibility. If you don't then you'll be fined into oblivion which will be enforced through various treaties
>>
>>65966311
>I want to force companies to not retain my data too
reported to the FBI for non-compliance with the PATRIOT act, inciting sedition and endorsing violence against corporations (legal people)
>>
>>65966160
Like Microsoft?
>>
>>65966311
Never.
>>
the US should become a little more citizen-friendly and the EU should become a little more business-friendly
>>
>>65966351
This.
>>
>>65966322
>Then you don't do business within the EU
The EU can stop their own citizens from doing business with me. I'm not doing it.
>making sure you don't becomes your responsibility
No
>If you don't then you'll be fined into oblivion
I won't pay them
>which will be enforced through various treaties
What treaty is going to cause my government to enforce a fine from an external country based on a law there made after the treaty? What are they going to do? Extradite me because my privacy policy wasn't worded properly?
>>
>>65966293
That's exactly what a terrorist would say.
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>>65966269
There is really no fundamental diffirence between holding the world to your standards and censoring them. A law is just censorship of certain behaviors. GDPR is basically white colonialism all over again.
>>
>>65966132
>>65965365

EU can enforce the law as long as you accept their users. They're defending their own citizens abroad, what every country does.

And no adding "you wave your right to GDPR if you accept access to this site" will not do anything, since GDPR explicitly states that user consent gained by forcing a user into one choice is not considered legit.

>>65966319
No that's bing.

Yandex is a russian one. And does an amazing job

>>65966361

>I won't pay them

You make it sound like you have a choice. Your own government will simply start stripping your income until your debt is settled.
>>
>>65966335
They couldn't force Microsoft to pay them anything, Microsoft voluntarily agreed to pay them, so the EU would allow them to continue selling software in the EU.
>>
>>65966376
>Your own government will simply start stripping your income
No they won't
>>
>>65966375

>GDPR is basically white colonialism all over again.

And thank God for that.
>>
Stop saying what you are or aren't going to do once it's enforceable. None of you has a relevant business.
>>
>>65966388
Yes they will, unless you think your government considers you more important than relations with the EU.

Which is quite frankly laughable since probably not your mum cares that much for you.
>>
>>65966400
>Yes they will
Prove it
>>
>>65964254
>get a "data deletion" WO in the ticket queue
>mark as "Resolved, no further action required"
>???
>profit
>>
>>65964254
This is where you squeeze your employers balls for that raise.
>>
>>65966412
I'll find your site, I'll leave my data and I will sue you 6 months later.
>>
>>65966412
Wait for may 25th.
>>
>>65966431
Okay, have fun
>>
>>65966269
>So if you're on WWW it should be expected that you follow laws of the WWW.
The GDPR is not a law of the WWW though. It's a law of the EU


And you make the fatal error of thinking that the internet is this ephemeral thing that exists beholden to no nation. The internet exists on hardware, ll of which exists in one country or another, and thus falls under those laws.

That's why it's legal for my to deny the holocaust on 4chan, but illegal to do so in RPGMO
>>
It is coming along fine, we are just blocking all of EU from accessing our services.
>>
This website is hosted in the United States and obeys only the laws of the United States. Court orders from non-American courts will be sent to /dev/null.
>>
>>65966285
>missing the entire point
The EU is trying to pass laws over countries it does not have jurisdiction over. Only greedy megacorps care about anything in the gdpr but that
>>
>>65963033
I am in the EU, but I didn't have time to read all the legislation.
Does anyone have a tldr for people who don't deal with any personal information aside from emails?
>>
While I admire the spirit of this law it reads like fighting the tide with a teaspoon. People will keep indiscriminately sharing everything about themselves and won't care one bit. We've willingly killed privacy. It's like that joke
>2005:
>you shouldn't share your real name in the internet, it's dangerous
>2018
>hey y'all sorry to all my fans for being late to uploading my weekly butthole pic
>>
>>65966442
>we
Who?
>>
We're already compliant, thanks
>>
>Added a boolean field to my application databases `is_eurocuck`
>Added a ticket category in our helpdesk software
>When helldesk escalates a "right to erasure" ticket IT resolves it by setting that boolean to true
>When we export data to sell it, we filter on that field unless the firm has paid the under the table "fuck the EU" fee to our executives.

Problem fucking solved.
>>
>>65966442
It's ok, we're all gonna do what we do with shit websites that use "anti-adblock" messages.
>press back
>>
>>65966441
>That's why it's legal for my to deny the holocaust on 4chan, but illegal to do so in RPGMO
So if I log into RPGMO and spam "the holocaust is a lie", the EU secret police are going to come to my house in New York and kick in my door? Laws are only enforceable for citizens and corporations under their jurisdiction, you can't just go suing random people across the world. The only power they have is blocking access to sites they think are bad. And blocking sites "for people's own good" just looks fucking terrible, and will never happen
>>
>>65966376
>EU can enforce the law as long as you accept their users
How? Once again, they are not within EU jurisdiction, nor in a place where EU applies.
>>
>>65965003
observe, the amerifat has no way to refute that the eu govt, shitty as it may be, at least does a much better job than theirs, and so resorts to random non-arguments and insults
>>
>>65966475
Sure it works.
Go sell your shit to India and China
>>
>>65966479
No, the admin will ban you so they (since they fall under EU law) can avoid the fine for allowing holocaust denial on their service.

Neither you nor I will face any consequences outside of getting booted from a shitty game
>>
ITT: Armchair lawyers general

As long as a company wants to do *any* business in the biggest market in the world (EU), compliance will be required; assets within EU will be exploitable while non compliant sites may be blocked (first and foremost, by payment pre-processors like paypal with assets within the EU). Bullshits like "ban the EU ips" are totally unnecessary if you don't have assets in the EU and don't serve EU citizens; sadly, burgers are creating scam sites like gdpr-shield.io (now taken offline, since it's scam) where "IP range-ban services" are sold like if they're necessary (and like gratis services like cloudflare wouldn't offer the same shit, if it were the case)
Read the fucking whole thing and don't rely on meme news sites
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32016R0679
>but it's so looong
shorter than many burger ToS, and I ain't even joking sadly
>>
>>65966452
>>65966484

That doesn't work for one simple reason of you're gathering data on EU citizens.

They're applying the law to the EU citizens, not you.

Say assault was legal in US and not in the EU. EU citizens comes to US and gets assaulted. You can and will be sued by the EU courts. Since you commited violence upon the EU citizen.

Does that enter your monkey brain ?

As long as the relations are good between the countries, they'll do it.

It's so fucking retarded to think European Union can't prosecute some site held by an anime faggot simply because he's in US...
>>
>>65966514
>non compliant sites may be blocked
Yeah that'll definitely happen
>>
>>65966507
>India and China
>Playing poker at the big boy table

Try again faggot.
>>
>>65966514
Only do business with american companies, only store your assets in america.
Problems solved, and you can keep selling eurocuck personal information
>>
>>65966514
I just add the entirety of europe to places I don't do business with, along with california and new york

>>65966523
>You can and will be sued by the EU courts. Since you commited violence upon the EU citizen.
Proofs?

>They're applying the law to the EU citizens, not you.
So Europeans will have to safeguard the data of others that they have.
>>
>>65966044
>Why do Americans
Let me stop you right there faggot, "Americans" are not all one person, why do all Europeans talk about how stupid Americans are, all the while immediately lumping all 375 million Americans into one monolithic caricature?

You stupid fuckers realize that we are the size of the EU yea? We aren't just one small country full of idiots like Greece. Want to be held accountable for Germany or Sweden? No? Well then stop pretending like because some stupid kike shill says something in New York City then that must be the exact same opinion of the entire population of Louisiana, you people are fucking stupid as hell.
Wake the fuck up retards.
>>
>>65966523
absolutely retarded. To access the service you're sending a request to a server hosted in america, that is a fucking retarded analogy

also stop

spacing

your

posts

like

this
>>
>>65966538
>problem solved
as long as paypal and any other payment pre-processor doesn't block you from receiving payments from yurop
>>65966553
k
>>
>>65966538

>I just add the entirety of europe to places I don't do business with, along with california and new york

You have no business. Otherwise you wouldn't ask for proof of super basic legal stuff like courts having the ability to sue international citizens.

>>65966562

>absolutely retarded. To access the service you're sending a request to a server hosted in america, that is a fucking retarded analogy


That doesn't matter you absolute fucking moron. Even if you write in your TOS that you waive your GDPR rights, they're still not waived. Same as you can't waive your right to life.

And no, make me your absolute fucking mutt
>>
>>65966097
>hurr durr it's corporations vs state, the state is evil
The state is a corporation, an all powerful one that rules all the others and has a monopoly on violence, why the fuck would you give them authority over anything if you didn't have to?
>>
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I love you Ameribros. We should be united against the heebs instead of fighting each other
>>
>"While we don’t yet have U.S.-EU negotiated civil enforcement mechanisms for the GDPR (and it is unknown whether we ever will), there is still the application of international law and potential cooperation agreements between U.S. and EU law enforcement agencies, which have been increasing in recent years."

>While we don’t yet have U.S.-EU negotiated civil enforcement mechanisms for the GDPR (and it is unknown whether we ever will)


>we don’t yet have U.S.-EU negotiated civil enforcement mechanisms for the GDPR
>>
>>65966585
How think is your skull?
>>
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>>65966586
>the state is a corporation
>i want to give them authority over everything
>>
>>65966585
>You have no business. Otherwise you wouldn't ask for proof of super basic legal stuff like courts having the ability to sue international citizens.

I want proof because I know you're wrong and you cannot provide proof when you're wrong.
>>
>>65966514
>http
they don't even enforce https, kek
https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32016R0679
>>
butthurt burgers crack me up desu
>>
>>65966601
What argument are you even trying to make?
>>
>>65966598
Yes, very think, too much think for a mutt brain
>>
>>65966622
Showing the idiocy of your misquote, brainlet.
>>
>>65966664
The only think you've showed is your lack of reading comprehension.
>>
Shit like this always ends up backfiring and putting more hoops on the consumer.

Just look at /v/, eurofags have ruined tons of video games with their shitty rules.
>>
>>65966586
> ... and has a monopoly on violence ...

SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED.
>>
>>65966695
Sorry for letting you refund your games, hope you can forgive us
>>
>>65966698
Yea, but they can have nukes and full autos, its hard as fuck for us to do the same, by their design.
>>
>>65963033
I received a change request from our development team to block all non-US IP's from hitting our e-commerce site. Easy fix.
>>
>>65966724
Nope. You faggots are the reason why Pokemon games don't have game corners anymore. Kill yourself.
>>
If I have a website and a client connects to it and send data, I can log and analyze it all I want. How anyone going to know in the first place? Even if someone asks, I can just lie. I encourage instead to use Tor. At least it really does something instead of the "we totally care about your privacy dude" placebo but with fancier wording.
I guess it will work better with corporations that want to stay legit but still, how are you going to know the corporation isn't just lying? Not like it never happened before.
'm just autismo that this is only a human (legal) solution that can always be bullshitted away and not a technical one. Take the cookie notification for example: sure it's nice telling normies that web is botnet but even if you don't, you can still fingerprint the shit out of them and they wouldn't know it unless they fancy reverse engineering obfuscated JS.
Also, can we stop the cookie notifications now if we comply with GDPR? Why not?

Basically this is just bunch of bureaucrats coming out of nowhere to tell me what I can do on my server and I reserve full right to reeee at it. I should be able to do whatever the duck I want on my sever knowing that the world will not fall apart because of it, not because of legal bullshit but because of technically sound design of the Internet.

>>65966424
Eeexactly.
>>
Someone redpill me on this GDPR thing:

>yuropoor tries to crack my system
>my IDS blacklists their IP
>upon noticing their route has been blackholed they mail my ICANN listed abuse e-mail and exercise their "right to erasure" or whatever

Am I seriously expected to remove their information from my blacklist or else face being sued?
>>
>>65966762
Well it's good that so many features have persisted in the series so we can get worked up over game corners.
>>
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>be american
>work for huge Healthcare IT company that serves hospitals all over the world
>had a seminar on this today
>basically the same shit we're already supposed to do (handle personal health information with care)
>seminar ends with them telling us that this is basically just at our discretion
>mfw going to keep not giving a fuck about eurofags' health info

Hey Erik Olsen from Sweden, how's that colon cancer coming along? Oh wait, it's terminal.

Yeah nothing basically changes in my industry, not like anyone ever gave a shit like they were supposed to anyways.
>>
>>65966793
TLDR you don't have to do shit because you're not a multinational corporation and the absolute worst that can happen is you get blocked in the EU
>>
>>65966376
Remember that time that Apple paid that 6 gorillion dollar EU fine?
Me neither.
>>
>>65966793
I'd assume yes, because GDPR considers IP addresses as "personal information". Just blackhole all yuropoors.
>>
Google's done

(I work there :) )

/g/ hates me but 180k (everything included with stocks) is too good. Free food and a bunch of other free shit means I save like 30 percent of that each year ;)

Feels good working for a botnet. FYI I run a thinkpad on arch and a OP5 with lineageOS and microG so no botnet in my life :)
>>
>>65966490
>large regulatory pressure and cost that makes doing ecommerce a larger cost than it is worth is not an argument.

there are literally whole "wordpress" plugins to let yurofags know they aren't welcome.
>>
>>65963033
I am British and do not have to comply with it as we are leaving the EU next year
>>
>>65966819
>Google's done

So you're the reason my marketing guys interrupted me asking why they got an e-mail about "data retention settings" from Google Analytics? Fuck you guy, you wasted a whole 15 minutes of my life having to explain that fucking e-mail to IT illiterate numbskulls.
>>
>>65966876
Oi m8, posting without a 4chan loicense?
>>
>>65966895
go away you horrible smelly foreign person
>>
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>>65963478
b-but my DISCLAIMER!!
>>
>>65966882

I'm a security analyst/ security software developer.

I make sure the "botnet" data doesn't get fucked lmao. Anyways it's not my fault that retarded people can't understand tech terms. Plus I'll probably get that sweet sweet promotion soon (after a certain level you need to super autistic to level up/get promoted)
>>
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> amerimutts SEETHING
>>
>burgers literally assblated because their kike meisters will now have to go through a bit of a hassle to spy on them
Well, I say! Those dangnum yuropoors ain't gonna tell me what to do! Shekelstein, yuo are my greatest ally, please tell eu that this is literally anotha shoah!
>>
>>65966992
>>65967000
>haha you're so fucking mad that your country didn't just fuck you over
>>
>>65966992
>image.jpg
says the american phone purchaser
>>
>>65966571
>payments from yurop
euroniggers dont have any money anyway so who cares ?>?
>>
>>65966351
Neither are citizen-friendly
>>
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>>65967016
>>
>>65967040
>when you lose an argument
>>
>>65967024
Honestly this. What would they miss out on, 5% of their income? Barely worth the hassle desu
>>
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>>65967045
I think the mutt is trying to say something
>>
>>65967045
>Implying what you posted was an argument.
>>
>>65967016
>fucking yurocucks will never understand the joy of being used by private companies and kikes
>SHALL NOT BE INFRINHED!
>>
>>65963255
Mind telling which company? t EU
>>
>>65966351
Business-friendliness is less important than things like privacy, democracy, human rights, basic ethics, ...

Doesn't mean you can't do business if you have to keep records more or less only for what you need.
>>
>>65965742
I was talking about myself here. I don't ship outside of Canada and US because it is too troublesome, too expensive and takes too long while everybody has Amazon Prime expectations.
I will only shit to Europoors through Prime as a matter of fact because Amazon takes care of everything and I only get paid.
>>65965390
X
>>65965429
You buy my shit you follow my rules or GTFO
>>65966269
Bulshit, EU only and only enforceable in EU. >>65966376
By that logic, since I also hold a Polish passport I can expect any Canadian and US company to apply EU rules to me because I have dual citizenship....? Yeah right.
>>65966490
Canuck, ain't amerifat
>>65967000
Dumb shit, sheckleberg will still spy on you as much as he wants.
The only thing this legislation does is making data collection a gov't monopoly and putting more regulatory burden on small businesses.
Can't believe how dumb some Euros are
>b b but muh gubmint is doing this to protect me
>>
So how do I use it? I no longer have access to a Twitter account, it hasn't been used for 10 years, there are like 9 tweets but it has my name on it, I remember in which city I made the account and that's about it.
>>
"Under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act all authorized access to this site and the servers wherein it resides is based on the willful attestation of users that they are not European residents"

Wonder how far the yuropoors assholes will get stretched when they get extradited to a federal prison awaiting trial for criminal hacking charges.
>>
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>>65963033
Britbro here, thank fucking fuck we're leaving the shitshow that is the EU.
>>
>create more legislation that increases the IT cost of businesses
>can't find locals with the skills
>seek out contract houses in foreign nations
>demand more h1b's or visa equivalents in other nation

starting to sound like some kind of immigration scam desu.

but really, the GDPR is just as nuts as HIPPA bullshit. it's just more middle manager audit trail bullshit and pajeet cube farms. only the biggest can afford it and it will only hurt IT cucks because all the smaller businesses will rely on contracting or third party vendors.
>>
>>65963033
My servers aren't in yuroshitland good luck sueing me. EU law is not international law.
>>
>>65967116
>i have no idea what we're discussing: the post
>>
>>65967090
are you a lawyer? can you attest to the strength of this disclaimer? I like it.
>>
>>65967158
He enjoys his CCTV, tv license, and soon cuck porn license.
>>
>>65967116
"We're absolutely leaving!"
-however many years ago that vote was.
Face it, you're never going to leave.
>>
>>65967116
The GDPR is a great law, though.

>>65967151
> EU law is not international law
Neither is US law, but both have a very long reach to declare things involving their citizens and businesses their nation's business.
The USA has done this a lot before, the EU is maybe just getting started.

Regardless, you may not have to comply for now.
>>
>>65966688
>comolains about reading comprehension when he misquoted in the first place
>>
>>65966311
Goyim, how dare you! Government regulation = bad, private organisations fucking you up = good!
>>
>>65967174
Not a lawyer. The thing is, don't trust lawyers on any of this shit. I have followed cases pertaining to computers since the big Napster debacle and lawyers prove themselves repeatedly that they don't have the slightest fucking clue how computers work. Most cases seem to be expert witnesses trying to out-analogy each other treating the judges and jury like preschoolers.

Do you think European lawyers have the slightest clue how VPNs work? How SSH tunnels work? How TOR works? The legal implications of all of the above methods in relation to GDPR? What defines the data they wish to restrict? Can I encrypt the data and suddenly not have it? Can I store it in Russia and tell them to suck my dick? Can I split every piece of data by even odd index of byte and store them in different countries and reassemble them claiming the data stored is gibberish?

Lawyers have NOT thought this shit through, they are not technical, not smart, and cannot possibly consider the ways to get around this shit.

I bet FB has already constructed several ways to get around GDPR and they can deploy these solutions at the flick of a switch.
>>
>>65967174
I'm sure your ... who even helps you ... will protect you from the EU, if in doubt.

Not that you'll likely get targeted unless you do some srs shit.

Also, why the hell wouldn't you want to support this instead? Wouldn't it be way more convenient for you if the USA introduced the same?
>>
>>65967194
We triggered article 50 well over a year ago, we're about 10 months away now m8, everything is going as I expected it would. Keep up, pal.

>>65967210
>The GDPR is a great law, though.
No it's not.
>>
>>65967194
I hope they leave with a hard brexit. Fucking chavs need a reality check.
>>
>>65966376
> And no adding "you wave your right to GDPR if you accept access to this site" will not do anything, since GDPR explicitly states that user consent gained by forcing a user into one choice is not considered legit.
The circular logic here confuses me.
>make disclaimer: "we are not GDPR compliant, if you are an EU user leave immediately, staying on the website constitute acknowledgement that you are NOT AN EU CITIZEN and DO consent to having your data harvested"
>but consent gained by forcing the user into a choice isn't valid
>therefore I'm not gdpr compliant
>therefore it's illegal to do business with EU citizens
>...which is exactly what my disclaimer stated, validating it
What will the EU do in that case if an EU citizen goes on my website anyway? Since he browsed my site, I took it that he acknowledged that he wasn't an EU citizen, and thus there was no reason not to let him browse while harvesting his data.
>>
>>65967286
>What will the EU do
Nothing
>>
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it's sad how fucked /g/ has become. ~5 years ago, /g/ would have been virtually universal in its approval for something like this (especially around the time of the snowden leaks). now we have a mix of /pol/nigger trolls and actually brain-damaged amerishits who unilaterally disagree with everything governments do.

anyway, cant wait for companies like >>65964254 prepare to go out of business. we've known nothing else than the rape and pillage that tech companies have committed over the past decade, and it's refreshing to see pushback against wanton abuses.

all of this could have been prevented too, you know. had companies put forth initiatives to self-govern themselves and form a body of some kind, i can guarantee the EU would have never gave a shit to care about user privacy. look what the video game industry back in the 90s did: they were a cunt hair away from government legislation, but then formed the ESRB, and haven't had a problem since. but because of breach after breach after breach after breach, it's clear companies don't give an iota of a fuck about their assets, and if a bunch of incompetent fall through the cracks, then so be it, they probably shouldnt have been in business to begin with.
>>
>>65967286
There's literally no reason not to become GDPR complaint.
Unless you're selling the data, in which case you will be the first against the wall.
>>
>>65967278
It will appear at times that you are winning or have even won this battle, but we are going to be better off for leaving the EU. Our bravery in being the first to walk out of the door will be rewarded in time to come.
>>
>>65967269
>Most cases seem to be expert witnesses trying to out-analogy each other treating the judges and jury like preschoolers.

sad because it's true. I wonder how many pedos were jailed for dubious shit like images hidden in zip archives in images or having CP in marked deleted areas of a filesystem like their system's cache

>>65967270
uh I don't even really store "data" really but why the fuck would I want to take on more costs to set up an auditable set of procedures to bend over backwards for people who are marginal to my organization?

the GDPR's right to be forgotten like language is also completely outlandish just like how yuros can tell google to stop indexing thingh about them they don't like. there are a lot of free speech issues with the whole thing if you think about it like that.
>>
>>65967269
Yea, pretty much all of this can be answered or could be decided in courts.

>The legal implications of all of the above methods in relation to GDPR?
Without going into extreme details, one thing you should understand is that de-identified data (such as you observing a normal non-network compromising amount of data on TOR) is not making you subject to most of these rules and obligations & you're also released from most if you don't store anything.

>Can I split every piece of data by even odd index of byte and store them in different countries and reassemble them claiming the data stored is gibberish?
No, because unlike Burger courts the EU courts are a lot more about intent and purpose rather than very exact wording.

In very simple words, you're not supposed to store data without asking explicitly to do so for a certain purpose and sticking with it, and you're supposed to grant access / insight / copies of the data plus the right to erase and stuff.

If you go against that with some superficial trickery, you'll probably get whacked. Is my guess.
>>
>>65967316
>There's literally no reason not to become GDPR complaint.
t. SAP or other large software vendor trying to sell some bullshit that will "GDPR" everything for you and then push customers onto companies like DXC to actually implement and maintain it.
>>
>>65967316
>be me
>make meme website for some random shit
>apache keeps logs by default. Or maybe I log some stuff like IP and user agent by hand
>it's publicly accessible from my home server
>forget about it
>I can now be sued for €20M
This is why GDPR is bad. Alternatively:
>run node of Mastodon/Diaspora/whatever decentralised service
>they're not fully compliant, e.g. can't delete data on request or something
>by running this node I can now be sued for €20M
>>
>>65967366
>Calling me a shill instead of actually arguing
Typical mutt cuck.
>>
>>65967330
My personal favorite is when Sergey Aleynikov got fucked by Goldman Sachs because the argued that he used software called "Subversion", and they tried to imply the literal definition of subversion.
>>
>>65965003
>American and Canadian market are big enough.
If you are anywhere besides small specialised shops then your company crashes with no survivors.
>>65966132
>fines google/facebook for 4% of yearly profit
Pshhh, nothing personel kid.
>>
>>65967352
> If you go against that with some superficial trickery, you'll probably get whacked. Is my guess.
Hmm let's see
>rangeban EU
>EU citizen uses VPN or VPS located in america/russia/china/whatever
>you end up storing his data in a non-compliant way
What next
>>
>>65967390
>implying you aren't some enterprise resource planning software marketer trying to shill people to buy/upgrade their license to the next version with automagics GDPR

i'm on to your tricks large software vendor jew.
>>
>>65963393
lmao good luck with that one
>>
>>65967398
lmao is that for real? really makes you think about the power of a jury of your peers.
>>
>>65963033

Why don't Yurocucks worry about their lack of freedom of speech instead of useless things like this?
>>
>>65966793
You're allowed to store data where there's a legitimate reason for keeping it, provided you store it securely and don't use it for other purposes
There's a few conditions for what constitutes legitimate reasons, but what you're suggesting would totally be allowed.
>>
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>>65967412
>He's literally on the side of corporate Jews.
>He calls me a Jew instead of arguing, again.
Good god. The actual state of Americans.
>>
>>65967116
GDPR will almost certainly be carried into UK law after leaving (as it should be)
>>
>>65967439
>I'm a corporate shill because I don't want to have to buy more software I can't maintain and pay for more support ocntracts and hire more faggy business degree holding worthless retards to pin blame and responsibility on when some vague regulation doesn't pan out the way it was expected.

the only corporate shill is you and your faggy regulatory diarrhea. jesus you neets literally don't know shit about ENTERPRISE software.
>>
>>65967330
>uh I don't even really store "data" really but why the fuck would I want to take on more costs to set up an auditable set of procedures to bend over backwards for people who are marginal to my organization?
Why would you have to if you don't store personal data and additionally meet the following:
> This Regulation applies to the processing of personal data of data subjects who are in the Union by a controller or processor not established in the Union, where the processing activities are related to: (a) the offering of goods or services, irrespective of whether a payment of the data subject is required, to such data subjects in the Union; or (b) the monitoring of their behaviour as far as their behaviour takes place within the Union.

Even if you do this, *mostly* you need to ask/inform before you collect personal data and be able to hand out data dumps or erase individual people if asked to.

> like how yuros can tell google to stop indexing thingh about them they don't like
No, not really. Read the article here:
http://www.privacy-regulation.eu/en/article-17-right-to-erasure-'right-to-be-forgotten'-GDPR.htm

Burgers with various intellectual property herpderp and Chinese in general can do more, I'd say.
>>
>>65967409
>What next
Follow the GPDR, obviously?

If you're anything but American or some country resolutely resisting the USA even in the face of sanctions, you should understand how this works overall, right? The USA pulled the same thing enough times overall, right?
>>
>>65967380
Read up on the law, neither of those things should cause issue.
>>
>>65967431
Because there is already more freedom of speech in the EU than there is in the USA.
>>
>>65967480
>Implying you even need to buy anything.
For fucks sake, literally just set up your logs to auto delete.
>>
>>65967491
>No, not really. Read the article here:

ok i read it and the terms are 100% unreasonable and vague which is allowed to be exempt for deletion

and what if I use kafka or other datastores with immutable designs? hell what if I'm literally using block chains? the data deletion is my strongest distate for this whole regulation.

the rest of your shit is just more regulatory babble that sounds fake as fuck and doesn't address the concern that I may have to have auditable proof that I'm not being any of those evil things.
>>
>>65967526
try walking around in an SS uniform in public in each area, and then get back to me
>>
>>65967409
If EU access to your site is only incidental, you wouldn't be expected nor required to comply.
Unless you're conducting business in the EU or getting a significant portion of your traffic from there, you shouldn't have any problems with it.
>>
>>65967568
No one will give a shit. Do that in America.
>>
>>65966375
holy shit lmao
>>
>>65967565
You already can't be like "well, one of our employees / users added copyrighted / trademarked / patented materials / business secret of another company / or the plans for a WMD to our website or data store, sorry we can't delete and will have to just continue using it with our customers". This will already get you fucked.

So really, your instinct that you couldn't hand out and/or erase things belonging to EU users is wrong.

> I may have to have auditable proof that I'm not being any of those evil things
Okay, you see that where in the legalese?
>>
>>65966523

>Say assault was legal in US and not in the EU. EU citizens comes to US and gets assaulted. You can and will be sued by the EU courts. Since you commited violence upon the EU citizen.
That's not how the law works at all. The EU does not have jurisdiction in the US, period.
>>
>>65967269
>>65967409
EU is setting up a precedent first and then fleshes out the details. If you store data is Russia, someone can appeal to EU court that their data was not deleted and for example that you didn't give it out on the request so you EU court will have an investigation into your company where you will have to go through legal battle or face fines or block of your website. On proxies you are forgetting that normies don't use that shit and that big companies if they would use it can both grabbed you and be grabbed by the balls since going for bigger fish that by law should hold an account of all things and is big as well. No, EU is not going to ZA WARUDO your small company's ass, this will mostly hit big players and even if they try to do some fuckery like slitting data and mixing it up EU will drag them through investigations and they won't be able not to comply. But, we might see some cases for medium sized companies and accidental leaks no matter how much you will try to go around GDPR. EU court is notorious for taking ages to finish the case but they drag it to it's conclusion be it Apple years old tax evasion or Google's decade's old monopoly (which was kind of silly desu). The EU set an eye on this issue and they are big enough to enforce it.
>>
>>65967210

>The USA has done this a lot before, the EU is maybe just getting started.
The EU does not have the weapons to get the US to comply with its laws.
>>
>>65967674
It does, it's called money
>>
>>65967313
I don't have an issue with the concept and what their trying to do so mich as what this is actually going to do and the fact that this isn't actually going to solve anything.

I trust the EU to do everything in its power to try and appear to work in the interests of people but fail spectacularly. Just like any other government body.
>>
>>65967668

>this will mostly hit big players
Big players who have servers physically located inside the EU, and we don't have to worry about jurisdiction issues.
>>
>>65967638
>The EU does not have jurisdiction in the US, period.
In theory, but you must have missed decades of the USA eroding this principle and creating all sorts of avenues for its companies and courts.

The EU does the same now, I think.
>>
>>65967688

And where do you think all the money in the world is?
>>
>>65967674
> The EU does not have the weapons to get the US to comply with its laws.
To an extent, sure it does.

But like the USA does it will probably not technically make the USA comply [unless they sign agreements to that effect]. It will probably make its companies comply instead.
>>
>>65967628
>Okay, you see that where in the legalese?

the part when some EU piece of shit sues or claims i didn't delete his/her data or claims i'm harvesting data that I'm not.

Do you think just saying, oh well it's totes gone is going to fly? no, you're going to need to have a good procedure--that will have to be fucking independently audited probably for the sake of not looking interest conflicting, that clearly shows data was ingested at x, was used in y ways and was deleted on z to comply with a lawful deletion request.

you're a retard, this law is retardedly expensive, the only people it benefits are retarded neets who think there is some giant corporate boogey man off their worthless data and at the end of the day this just gives more business to scummy piece of shit businesses like oracle and google and ibm and red hat and HPE and ... etc etc. I guess you could say worthelss IT fucktards will likely see more job opportunity as well. lawyers too for sure.
>>
>>65967710
All around the world obviously.
>>
>>65967716

The only companies it will get to comply will be large companies with servers all over the world, like Google, Amazon, Facebook, etc... companies that need a good dick in their ass anyways. A small company that only operates in the US can simply send back an email saying, "sorry, we're not European and don't have to obey European laws."
>>
>>65967710
>EU is literally the worlds biggest market.
I think it's pretty bloody clear.
>>
>>65966295
Actually, that's what I'm hoping will happen.
EU regulations will fuck the big data jews from the USA in the ass, so eventually this will eat into their revenue.

Secondly, this will embolden local companies from the EU to get in the online search business.
>>
>>65966305
Oh man, pls make this happen. Can't wait for Facebook and Google to be completely unavailable in the EU.

PLS MAKE THIS HAPPEN TOMORROW :DDDD
>>
>>65967763
Except they've already fixed their systems and policy to be compliant.
>>
>>65967749
is there any proof of the latter claim?

without a lawyer, how can you know there isn't some US/EU commerce treaty that impacts you if you aren't GDPR compliant?
>>
>>65967732
> the part when some EU piece of shit sues or claims i didn't delete his/her data or claims i'm harvesting data that I'm not.
Eh, this isn't necessarily a Burger procedure where you will have to prove innocence from the start.

Or even be like with DCMA or worse where you gotta scramble to figure out who did what and all that to keep content online.

It'll probably be more like an EU procedure where the accuser will have to show something? If you technically had the data and nobody could show it (also because you never visibly used the data) you'd likely be fine?

> you're a retard, this law is retardedly expensive
Probably not. Seems like a cheap way to get law-abiding and also ethical companies to just fucking grand access to personally associable data and on request erase it and such. Either is one or a few DB commands unless you intentionally make it hard.
>>
>>65967697
>Big players who have servers physically located inside the EU
For the billionths time this applies to data collection of EU residents REGARDLESS of your physical server location if you deal with EU citizens. It’s just that going after small and medium sized companies will be a hassle unlike going after big players.
>>
>>65966793
No that's keeping data for security purposes. It's the same if your server logs all IPs that tried accessing it, you don't have to erase the logs if they ask you to because they are kept for security purposes
>>
>>65967800
There isn't any suing at all, all someone can do is report you to their regulatory body, who then look into it, and decide what action is necessary. Unless there's intentional misuse, or gross negligence on a massive scale like >>65964254 , it'll likely just start with a warning.

Here's the actions taken by UK regulatory body for an example of what to expect.
https://ico.org.uk/action-weve-taken/enforcement/
>>
>>65963033
Super easy. I use WordPress for all my client projects and all I had to do was install a few plugins and update the privacy policy.
>>
>>65967749
> "sorry, we're not European and don't have to obey European laws."
It'll always depend on how far the EU wants to go.

But I figure they'll draw from the play book the USA usually plays when it tries to force companies to comply [be it banks, oil companies or whoever else], and they probably can't resist. Of course they surely will have to fuck with the GDPR visibly enough to even get targeted.

Again, I don't even think compliance is that hard for the reason that it has approximately the same nature as a trademark / copyright / trade secret / patent / ... takedown request, but simpler since it's just gonna require some DB queries or such rather than a whole room full of of lawyers to assess the validity and scope of claims and other shit.
>>
>>65965365
>oy vey how does the us enforce its laws on other countries
excatly the same shit. the only difference is the GDPR is actually good
>>
>>65967859
And that's a good thing. I want these fucking public servant to go after Kikenberg and delete all the shit he's been collecting on me, even though I don't even use a facebook account.

Why should I allow an Israeli firm from the USA to track my every move on the internet and sell it to advertisers? What kind of a tool can you be to support this?

The EU is doing the right thing here, even though it might be for some other reasons. But I want this data-gathering shit to fucking stop and I want to be able to block it.
>>
>>65968086
Fuck off I am not US
And US can enforce it's laws because it has fleet and arsenal to wipe off your pathetic cuntries off the face of the planet
>>
>>65968105
Well, you wouldn't want to see the EU ally with China and Russia against the US, would you?

At one point the US might basically become isolated, without any allies. Then we'll see how much influence they'll have anywhere in the world, when they get kicked out of everywhere. Do you even have any idea how many US military bases there are in Europe and everywhere? Imagine those disappearing tomorrow. Suddenly the US becomes just another country, whose currency nobody wants to use, whose military bases nobody wants to host.. whose products nobody wants to buy.. and eventually they just run out of people to fund their debt. Because you know, the USA lives on debt.
>>
>>65968094
> even though it might be for some other reasons
What makes you say that? This is probably actually just a law for the benefit of the EU's citizens.

Did you think the confidentiality requirements for doctors, trustees, lawyers, even police and so on are for "some other reasons"?

It just turns out that IT and database admins and whoever else somehow regularly are able to accumulate more privacy intrusive etc. data than the above, so the law is soon that people have [pretty damn analogue] right to access / copy / erase the data and that additonally IT / DB admins and so on are required to not collect fucking everything without consent.and all that.

Rich or poor, the vast majority of people have strong reasons to prefer this over some opposite like that everyone is data kraken-able.

And the world wouldn't go to shit if everyone joined this with their citizens. This can work for basically everyone, right?
>>
>>65963478
>world's biggest economic area
Not according to the IMF, World Bank, or UN for 2017 sweetie.
Also by 2019, you will lose the second largest economy in your "economic area"
>>
>>65965390
>your government will cooperate with the European authorities
Really? You honestly think the NSA will cooperate and delete European people's data from their servers?
Give me a break.
>>
>>65967859

And for the billionth time, your laws can apply to what your citizens do and what is done on your country's soil, not what is done to your citizens on other countries' soil by other countries' citizens.
>>
>>65968500
Pretty sure NSA isn't actually included in GDPR.
>>
>>65965365
>Collect data from people in EU
>How will EU enforce laws?
By suing your ass? It's not unheard of to sue someone over the seas.
>>
>>65968547
And if that doesn't work, presumably US style pressure on your company, at least if you're a big enough target.
>>
I can't be arsed to do anything that would violate GDPR.
>>65963871
I am pretty sure you won't get in trouble for shit that they do.
>>
>>65968594
What do you mean won't work?
If you don't show up? it will default and youwill be fined and your website will be blocked.
>>
>>65968628

>your website will be blocked
Who cares?
>>
>>65968628

Also

>you will be fined
How do they intend to collect? Only the US government has the ability literally garnish your wages in the US.
>>
>>65968874
The absolute state of NA education...
>>
>>65968923

Fines mean nothing if not backed by the ability to forcibly take money from a bank account or paycheck.
>>
>>65969307
Interpol is a thing you know.
>>
>>65964254
You sould quit sooner, because the deadline for GDPR is before your quitting date.
Before quitting send a email to the higher ups bitching about how they didnt gave you ANY support for the implementation, bitch about the ERP fuckers dont doing their part too.
Basically, cover your ass.
Yeah, i know what you mean. In many companies IT staff is expected to solve anything, fast, with a smile, even if you arent payed enough, because people who are certified to solve certain IT problems are way above your paygrade.
>>
>>65966424
it's a government organization, we're often being checked by local anti-corruption agencies and whatnot, since they put me in charge I'd rather not do any funny stuff I might get in trouble for

>>65966426
I did, they said no. I then handed in my resignation. They offered me a 50 dollar raise
>>
some other team in my company is dealing with it but I might have to chip in for some of the obfuscation of data.

fucking europussies
>>
>>65966474
Hope sites will do that, would make it easier not to do business with companies that don't respect privacy.
>>
>>65969327

Interpol doesn't actually have any ability to enforce laws. Its main job is assisting in coordinating law enforcement agencies to deal with crimes committed between countries. But again, you would nonetheless have to get a US court and US law enforcement agencies to enforce your shitty EU law.
>>
>>65963096
This
>>
>>65964254
You should probably quit before management scapegoats you.
>>
My products don't store PII, so I'm not worried.
>>
>>65963393
retard
>>
>hurr durr this won't change anything for muh clapistan companies!!!!
>getting daily emails about privacy policy changes from US-only companies regarding GDPR
l m a o
>>
>>65963478
I am european. If you don't want to enter my site - fuck off.
>>
>>65963567
>>65963573
Fuck I hate EU. Authoritarian shithole. Need to get the fuck out.

What is next? You cant log actions of someone sshing into your server?
>>
>>65968430
He said "one of the world’s biggest economic area", probably meant areas but you're also retarded for not understanding that.
>>
>>65971067
They'll just block EU ips
>>
>>65971441
good, now I'll switch everyone on open source alternatives since there are no excuses anymore
>>
>>65971404
give me one good reason to collect extensive info on your users or keep it afterwards without resorting to "muh partner deals" or "m-muh BI I won't even use"
>>
>>65965449
> Treat all data as if it were a password or credit card number
md⅝(user.getEmail())
sounds like a really bad idea.
Not worse idea than EU though. I will just need to save rainbowtable (aka mapping table that joins hash and email...)
>>
>>65965435
What if I don't want to remove them from db? What if I need to keep their information for security purposes?
>user creates account.
> spends two days sql injecting/xss ing and posting CP
> plz remove my info
>ok. Deleted
> police comes.
> give all info on idiot that posted cp
> can't do sir.
> aiding criminal!
> get ass widened in jail for aiding cp poster.
>>
Does this affect individuals in any way? How do you even comply? The info on their euro site is all over the place and doesn't explain much. Like it's for registered businesses with over 200 employees but also sites that "collect sensitive info". The compliance bit doesn't elaborate much either and you apparently have to hire someone from their cabal to supervise it all anyway?
I run a couple of discussion forums and a tiny, non-profit private server of Lineage 2, no businesses, so I assume this doesn't impact me?
>>
>>65971457 read >>65971511

Many security resons.
> user scams other user
> plz delete my info
> ok
> police comes.
> no records of scammer
This shit will be abused like hell.
>>
>>65971511
>Forward info to police BEFORE deleting it.
Wow that sure was hard.
>>
>>65971538
>before
oh sure. What if I DID NOT KNOW BEFORE?
what if that user was reported to police by spaming CP in PMs which as admin I do not track?
what if user was reported to scaming after I had to delete him?
>>
>>65971551
>Pls delet my info
>Check recent activity
Hmmmm.
Alternatively you could prolly get away with telling the police that, as a way to comply with that EU law, you remove all logs on a regular basis.
After all, apple got away with not installing backdoors.
>>
>get automatically unsubscribed from newsletters
>know I can request my private data
These are just 2 things that make GDPR worth it.
Any other nation or union doesn't have their shit together and are lagging behind on protecting the user over companies.
>>
>>65971566
> check recent activity
Oh sure. Read all private pm's. Somehow figire put if dude scammed someone or is already under some investigation or some shit.

>tell police I was just complying with laws
You seem to know wery little how this shit works. Now you are suspect of either helping scammer/cp seller (maybe you were his partner and hid tracks) or it was you all along.
Or maybe I should just send all info to police whenewer someone requests deletion?
tl;dr fucking idiots in EU doing stupid shit as always. Or pol is always right...

> After all, apple got away with not installing backdoors.
1. Different things
2. You are naive
>>
>>65971587
1. You can unsub from newsleters anyway. If you cant... there is spam filters for that.
2. Why do you leave private data on random sites?

It's idiotic attempt to fix personal problems by using laws and governments. But hey, EU is mrksist. And you know what marxists say - personal is political.
>>
>>65971608
And you're retarded.
Complying with the actual fucking law is a pretty legitimate reason for doing something. You're not going to get shafted for aiding a criminal.
Imagine how much shit sites like Facebook and Twitter would get, how many scammers do you think use those services?
>>
>>65971615
Yes you can get into problem for following laws you fucking idiot.
And comparing some small project run by one person to rich companies that have whole lawyer firms on speed dial? Who is retard here?
>>
>>65971642
Give me literally one example of a person being convicted for following the law.
>>
>>65968132
>US might basically become isolated, without any allies
That's exactly what the Founding Fathers wanted, retard.
>>
>>65971530
Security reasons are 100% allowed, without needing consent or to follow deletion requests, you just have to store it securely and not use it for other things
>>
>>65967751
Nope
https://www.thebalance.com/world-s-largest-economy-3306044
>>
>>65971680
Then why are burgers complaining?
>>
>>65971831
>implying the >300000000 modern Americans share the same views as their founding fathers several centuries ago did
>>
>>65971797
>The EU was in second place.
I mean.
It doesn't make the point less valid.
>>
>>65971650
Ffs dude. I don't remember every thing that happens in EU. Not going to jail but old man in UK got arested for lawfuly defending himself against burglar. There are cases of people going to jail for following law - all ot takes is good lawyer to prove that "you had to see future before following law".
>>
>>65971770
So when iser says "delete me" I can extract all his data and save encrypted blob somewhere safe? If yes then that is ok.
>>
>>65971909
>Not going to jail but old man in UK got arested for lawfuly defending himself against burglar.
So he didn't get convicted.
They found that he was in the right.
"There are cases!"
Except you've failed to provide any.
Of course, if you did manage to find one, you'd find that it would have to be extremely murky, with lots of gray lines, maybe even flat out lacking legal precedent.
The case with deleting logs on the other hand is clear as day.
>>
>>65971913
If the user asks to be deleted, but you need the data for a legitimate reason, you don't have to comply with deletion requests at all.
https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/lawful-basis-for-processing/legitimate-interests/
>>
>>65971850
Then why the fuck use the Founding Fathers' views as an argument.
Jesus Christ.
>>
>>65972132
I never did.
Jesus Christ.
>>
>>65972151
>>65972132
Jesus Christ be praised!
>>
>>65963393
>I was only travelling, police officer, nor driving.
>>
>>65963033
I see all the companies trying to come up with bullshit ways to have a lawful access to your info and i laugh at their stupidity,generally i feel more secure plus started getting mails from all the spamming niggers if I want o continue receiving their mail.
>>
>>65965365
>be Kim Dotcom
>have all business in New Zealand
>US gubmnt seize everything I own despite my business being based in NZ and never set foot on US soil

Hmmmmmmmmmmm
>>
>>65971938
> you failed to provide
Yes. Because I don't have amazing memory and I do not have autistic list of these things. Go ask pol they will give you full fucking list because there are such cases. And yes I am ignoring all the "woman attacked man and he went to jail for self defence" because you will not count them.
>>
>>65971954
>Legitimate reason
Defined by who got better lawyer. My reason "police might ask about actions of this user or its ip on my system" is always valid.




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