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I am very interested in learning more about this culture. I am looking for references to sources as close to their time as possible or other highly credible sources.
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>>5622105
No one has any idea, and any answer you get here will be 100% politically motivated.
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>>5622105
They might have been pre-Indo-European but we don't know for sure. Their language seemed to have a lot of odd consonant clusters and even triple-repeated consonants.
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>inb4 "we wuz vikanganz and shiiiet "
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A (probably) Brythonic-speaking Celtic people who through continuous contact with Ireland eventually became Gaelicised
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>>5622364
>A (probably) Brythonic-speaking Celtic people
We honestly don't know, the only reason people assume they were Celtic is that some words on Pictish runestones kinda sorta look Celtic
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>>5622351
Unlikely since Scots are more genetically Indo-European than the English and Germans and slightly more than the Irish
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>>5622351
>>5622414
>>5622423
https://atlantisrisingmagazine.com/article/the-discovery-of-the-old-world-by-native-americans/
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>>5622105
do you own a time machine by any chance?
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Impossible to know. They left no writings until the Gaelic era but by then Pictish culture was really Gaelic.
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>>5622414
As far as I'm aware there aren't any unambiguously Celtic inscriptions on the Pictish stones. The idea that they were Celtic-speaking is purely a supposition.
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>>5622758
It's a pretty safe assumption, given the evidence of names and especially placenames (look at the distribution of -pitt placenames within the former Pictish area, -pit being a Brythonic suffix for "field"). Picts spoke a form of P-Celtic like the Welsh.





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