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File: Metal-Slug2.jpg (402 KB, 1215x896)
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How is the pixel art in 2d videogames done in comparison to manga and western comics? Are they even more of a team effort? Do they trace over 3d models for animations too like some mangakas do? What are some noticeable Snes/Arcade/Genesis games where some sprites/backgrounds are just filtered photos?

Let's say, the pixel art in something like Metal Slug isn't exactly done by just 1 person, right?
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They were usually a team effort, at least in the late 80's and 90's.
Tracing of 3D animations and also photos and videos was sometimes done. Mortal Kombat is a good example of where they used footage of live actors and converted it to sprites.
Traditional paintings were sometimes scanned for backgrounds. Lucasarts did this a lot for their point and click adventures.
Scanned stuff was rarely used raw, though, and whatever automatic "filters" they had were very primitive and so were 3D renders so usually they had someone to manually go through the raw output and tweak things by hand to make it look actually pretty.



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