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File: fallout_gas_station.png (1.01 MB, 1682x935)
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Hi.
I'm new to digital painting, and painting in general, and I'm having a hell of a time to figure stuff up. I have doubts and I intend to explain part of my process in order to clarify why I have them. Thanks in advance for the help.

1 - Set Up
I usually paint in one layer with a round opaque brush. Seldom do I use an airbrush or a watercolor one. Every time I see a pro artist painting they use opacity brushes. Why? Even when they go to fill an area they use them instead of an opaque one. I can't get my head around it. Should I use more than one brush? Should I use more layers? Do I need textured brushes?

2 - Edges
Pic related is a work of mine that illustrates well my doubts. Focus on the gas pumps for instance. I paint an object with a color, them I shade it. At the end I paint the highlighted areas in the visible edges. I do it because I read that edges get the most of light. This holds true to everything else in the painting as you can see. Am I doing it right? Say I want to achieve a realistic look, why does it feels counter intuitive?

3 - Colors
How do people like Marco Bucci throw blue in a woman's face, or green in areas that usually shouldn't have these colros and make it look good? My colors in comparison look blend and boring. Instead of a realistic look, I get a cartoonish look.

4 - Overall painting direction / Style
How can I make my paintings look less digital and less comic-book like? I aim for a more realistic/fantasy style.

5 - Resources
Currently I have no resources in order to achieve my goals. What are some nice books I should be reading/creators I should be watching in order to improve my painting skills?
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>>6288889
OP here, pic related is a good example of the look I'm after.
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>How do people like Marco Bucci throw blue in a woman's face, or green in areas that usually shouldn't have these colros and make it look good?
He knows how color temperature works, and plays with it masterfully.
When he does it, it's not a big brushstroke, but rather a tiny one to add eye candy and make your brain go "ah, this is affected by temperature" even if you have no idea what this concept it.
Anyway, you just have to keep in mind you dont HAVE to slap in a blue on a red-ish surface to give it color variation through temperature, you can just pick a cooler red by desaturating it, and splashing it on lightly, this will bring some nice variation to the painting.
Have in mind that desaturating = bringing your color to the other side of the color wheel, therefore desaturating blue will make it look warmer, desaturating red will make it look cooler.
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>>6288903
Hm... Interesting. I know literally nothing in regards to color theory. Any good resources on it?
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>>6288889
>>6273247
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>>6288889
>How do people like Marco Bucci throw blue in a woman's face, or green in areas that usually shouldn't have these colros and make it look good
Good values. He precisely has a video on that very topic, where he paints with random hues, made invisible by a gray filter or something.

> I do it because I read that edges get the most of light
> What are some nice books I should be reading/creators I should be watching in order to improve my painting skills
Those kind of things happens because you read about how to do things instead of studying Nature. Simple still lives are great for you to study how light behaves on various kinds of objects.

So do still lives. You also want to drill master studies: take the time to observe and to try to replicate pieces you like.

I would recommend you to do trad to some degree, at least sketching around with a pen/graphite on a random sketchbook, this can only benefits you. Besides still lives and master studies, I would also advise not to underestimate the importance of composition; there's a book by Jack Ham on the topic in the context of landscapes which is okay.

As for courses, there this recent book "Color and Light" by 3D Total which I would strongly recommend you to look. There's an online scan somewhere and some online flip-through; but if you can and think you'll enjoy the content, don't hesitate to commit a little by buying the book.

Regarding digital techniques, I'm a trad, so I can't help much. But generally speaking, keep your tools simple, and take the time to experiment. For instance, spend a few hours on a piece with your current setup, and only allow yourself to use a few more layers, and see how this goes.
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>>6288910
Thought I had too many to post there.
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>>6288913
>>6288913
Definitely will do. Thoughts on "Imaginative Realism" and "Color and Light: A Guide for the Realist Painter"? These are the only ones I've been recommended so far. I draw a lot traditionally don't worry!
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>>6288926
>Imaginative Realism
Never went through this one,

> Color and Light: A Guide for the Realist Painter
but I do own this one, I bought it a few years ago, before the 3D Total was out. My memory is rusty, and I haven't took the time to compare them. I guess there's a lot of overlap; both certainly do contain valuable input regarding light and how to use it for painting.

Perhaps spending a hour flipping through both and getting a feel for them to help you choose would be the wise option
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>>6288907
There's Marco Bucci videos on the /ic/ course torrent.



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