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File: Colormixing.jpg (116 KB, 631x600)
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Previous: >>>6302747
No art supplies thread so I made one.
Is artist grade Gouache worth it? I watched some Lightfastness test of famous artist grade gouaches and think they aren't that much different than my current cheap Chinese gouache. Are there any other quality to considered?
I also want to start painting with acrylic. Do it need any special medium like oil paint or just apply directly on canvas?
>>
>>6367918
do you intend on archiving it or advertising it as archival quality? then yes it matters 100 years from now the lightfastness will matter
>>
you can paint acrylic on bare canvas, but priming creates a more uniform surface for more even strokes. there is not much to worry about the canvas rotting, but there is a disease that affects thousands of acrylic painters in the developed and developing world called surface induced discoloration (SID)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Csr2Q-cSczI
>>
Thanks so much for all replied. Also I discovered that I cwn paint acrylic on 180 gsm paper just fine, like gouache, for practice purpose of course
>>
has anyone hear used himi jelly gouache and monte marte tube gouache? are they comparable?

i live in a third world country and quality art supplies are hard to come by. so i have to settle for cheap stuff.
>>
>>6368016
just say it’s lightfast, problem solved
what’s the buyer gonna do, sue me in 100 years? lmao
>>
>>6367918
Depends on the colors and obviously on the pigment, let's just say that even on artist grade gouache they're very liberal with their lightfastness grading. Traditional gouache was never meant to be archival, it doesn't form a film once it dries, it's chalky and gets dirty fast unless you put it under glass, it's was meant for illustrators to quickly turn their artwork, photograph it for publishing and forget about it.
General speaking you should worry about the pinks but there are colors that people not suspect like raw sienna and yellow ochre, they will get grayer, unless you use W&N brand which has better pigments than other brands.
Even acrylic will shift, I have Golden Fluid Yellow Ochre and it shifted to gray months later. Any color that looks saturated and vibrant won't stay that way for long.
>>
>>6368450
Himi better by far imo.
They also have a spray bottle that keep the gouache alive.
The problem is it's smelly.
>>
>>6368703
You are right. Even old masters fon't use " artist grade" paint. It's the job of museums.
>>
>>6367918
>Is artist grade Gouache worth it?
Yes. You'll get more pigment, smoother grind, better flow, single-pigment colours (better mixing), less fillers (more vibrant). Schmincke is great, and I can wholly recommend. Just get a few tubes of artist-grade instead of a bunch of chinesium.

>I also want to start painting with acrylic. Do it need any special medium like oil paint or just apply directly on canvas?
Water-soluble, so thinning with water works. You'll only need mediums if you want to thin it a ton, since super-thinned paint films are not necessarily durable. Other than that you can pretty much paint on anything. It's essentially coloured plastic.

There's like a million mediums that you won't need but that could be nice, like thickeners, thinners, drying time extenders, crackling, more shine, less shine, flow improvers, etc. You can make a frankenpaint to your specific liking if you really want to tinker with it.

>>6368450
As said in last thread, Mont Marte probably does not manufacture their own stuff and commission random (see: cheapest) manufacturer to make stuff they just repackage. Sometimes you can get decent stuff, but it really is playing art supply gacha.

HIMI Jelly Gouache is significantly better, and honestly a pretty decent quality paint. I would recommend Holbein, if that's available in your neck of the woods.

>>6368722
>unless you use W&N brand which has better pigments than other brands.
Holbein, WN, Schmincke Horadam, and M. Graham all make Gouache without the addition of whiteners, relying on pure pigment density to get opacity. Any of these will work. It's notable that Holbein is by far the cheapest, at least in EU, and Schmincke pigment is very finely ground so it's less opaque than the others.
>>
>Holbein, WN, Schmincke Horadam, and M. Graham
Fillers in gouache is good, specially to paint the base tone, yeah Holbein in EU is the cheapest and I use it for the brighter values since they have no fillers but some colors are transparent, W&N to me is still the best and they use fillers on some colors which is why they're all opaque and uniform. There are other excellent brands like Sennelier and Meimeri. Talens is good for painting large areas as it's cheap and the pigment load is acceptable.

Schmincke I only have the designer branding, never found the Horadam outside Jackson's and they were too expensive even without shipping and taxes.
>>
>>6369785
>Holbein in EU is the cheapest and I use it for the brighter values since they have no fillers but some colors are transparent
Yeah Holbein and Schmincke are both brands where you need to get into the habit of mixing white to get opacity, as some colours just aren't opaque otherwise.
On the plus side, those transparent colours are great for glazing and washes if that's the way you want to work. You can get great vibrant results. It's a different paradigm from WN for sure.
>>
>>6369824
Quality gouache is now readily available from many brands these days, even cheap brands like Talens are good enough.
The problem for me now is the round synthetic brushes, only the English know how to make them and with Brexit it became serious expensive to order them.
>>
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has anybody tried Shinhan oil paints? I can get them pretty cheap where I live, and they claim to be professional grade, but I can't find any real reviews anywhere. How do they compare to Michael Harding or Old Holland? Is it pure pigment and oil or do they add fillers? Any info would be appreciated.
>>
>>6369769
>Holbein, WN, Schmincke Horadam, and M. Graham all make Gouache […] relying on pure pigment density to get opacity
none of them do, it’s a marketing meme, when you ask directly they will admit to using fillers “in certain pigments” to achieve opaqueness
it’s legalese, as long as they have a couple of tubes of cheap pigment without fillers, they can make vague implications about their process being based on pigment density
>>
>>6370213
Both Holbein and M. Graham are on the record saying that they do not, in fact, use whiteners or opacifiers. W&N apparently does use opacifiers, so you were correct on that.

Schmincke's site has safety data sheets with contents for everything they do, so you're free to go check for yourself. HORADAM does not have additives, Designer's Gouache does.
>>
>>6370675
http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2015/06/gouache-ingredients-info-from.html
>holbein
>[…] Typically they achieve opacity through pigmentation
>graham
>[…] there are some that are so transparent that opacity requires whiteners
>>
Is there any point in buying colors like thalo green, diox purple, cad orange, etc. if I already own a warm and cool set of the primaries?
Is it just a shortcut for mixing or are there hues I can't get through mixing primaries?
>>
>>6368910
their paints were surprisingly high quality and fit their painting methods. just a few pigments didn't last well. modern paints have problems of their own.
>>
>>6371519
depends on the pigment in question and what exactly your primaries are
also, economically it might make a difference over time, I guess
>>
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I'm a European and today I bought a paint tube cap opener from Golden which is an American brand. Got home and now I see this warning on it. I just checked and this same product has a warning about it on Jerry's. How big a problem is this or is this just a handholdy Murrican thing? Should I throw it away? It just seems made out of plastic? I would be swell to not get cancer if I can help it. Thanks anons.
>>
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>>6371100
>>holbein
>>[…] Typically they achieve opacity through pigmentation
And literally before that:
>Holbein does not add any of these ingredients.
???? And on their site:
>No whitening agents are added to Holbein Designer Gouache to increase opacity.
I guess maybe they add something that's not talc, calcium carbonate, marble dust, or titanium dioxide, or a whitener of any kind, but that contributes to opacity somehow. No clue what though. I'm guessing they mix transparent pigments with an opaque pigment of a similar hue, but since they're an autistic weeb brand that does not list pigments used I can't verify.
>>graham
>>[…] there are some that are so transparent that opacity requires whiteners
And literally the line below:
>Instead of formulating with opacifiers or whiteners, we leave this decision to the artist.
They are acknowledging that not all of their colours are opaque, not that they're adding opacifiers. In fact, they're acknowledging that the colours are not opaque *because* they're not adding opacifiers/whiteners.

>>6371519
What medium? For watercolour in particular, different pigments behave differently in terms of granulation and transparency, and it might be worth it to even have two pigments of the exact same hue.
Overall you'll also get a wider gamut with a primary+secondary palette than the warm/cool primaries palette as well. See picture related: Going to tertiary colours provides only marginal benefit, apart from the adddition of dioxazine violet.
>>
>>6371672
It's ABS. To get cancer from it, you'd need to heat it to 400 degrees celsius and then sniff the fumes, which would contain butadiene (known carcinogen) and styrene (likely a carcinogen).
Other than that don't grind it into a cloud of microplastics to clog your lungs or literally choke on it and you'll be safe.
>>
>>6371686

thanks anon, i figured as much but now i'm reassured, wasn't really planning on doing any of those things.
>>
after spending hundreds on art materials throughout the years, i finally know the cheapest ways to do art that my beginner self would envy.
>>
>>6371672
Not even an American thing, it's a retarded Californian thing. Google Prop 65 if you're curious, but the tl;dr is damn near everything is known to the state of California to be carcinogenic and will be labeled as such lol.
>>
>>6371699
share your knowledge, anon
>>
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I wasted an entire tube of Indian yellow because i wanted a dark blue underpainting to show through, and it didn't cover for shit.
looked like mac and cheese in a dark pan.
>>
>>6372142

Some colours are transparent or semi-transparent anon, there should be symbol on the tube to tell you.
>>
>>6372118
chalk/marble dust (can extend pigments in oil; use for making paint transparent for glazing in oil; traditional glue chalk ground is less expensive than ready-made acrylic ground and dry components store longer; use as opacifier in gouache)
rabbit skin glue/hide glue (used for grounds, sizing; distemper medium; glue for attaching canvas to board)
metal point (small piece lasts very long; brass can be found for free, or buy/find wire that lasts many life times over; some can fit into a clutch pencil; can coat scrap wood with chalk and or some other ground of your choice in weak glue size and reuse board for scrap drawings, by recoating or scraping)
charcoal powder (can be made for free; decent for ink with suitable binder ground finely; good for paint; use for tracing; many other uses)
egg (yolk and pigment for egg tempera, good for lean underpainting for oil paint or as a cheap and durable paint, don't need entire yolk; can make water-miscible paint by adding to oil paint, thin and clean with water instead of solvents; glair, made by whipping egg white and letting liquid separate from foam, can be used as paint or ink binder; adjust strength with distilled water; can be dried by pouring in a shallow container and letting sit, dissolve again by water; supposedly aged wet, not too tightly sealed glair is better; can be modified by adding honey or sugar etc; used in some varnish recipes; can be use in metal point grounds)
>>
What is the cons of usinv acrylic as water color? From what I can see it's not that much different. Diluted acrylic even waterproof and don't change color like gouache when dry.
>>
>>6372834
cracking
>>
>>6372834
None if you use inks, if not then the film isn't strong enough to adhere to the other layers, should be fine if you're just staining the paper. Use gesso, it will create blooms like watercolor.

Too much water will upset the balance and spread the acrylic polymer too thinly so the molecules can't reconnect properly to form a stable film. Instead you should dilute with an acrylic medium, which is essentially the same as the paint but without the color pigment.
>>
>>6372838
>>6372846
Thank you.
Is 50% cotton different than 100% cotton watercolor paper? Is it important to buyers?
>>
>>6372834
Dries faster so you get less working time.
Surface will form a film, so additional layers behave differently.
Has a bit of a shine, so white paper stays matte and painted areas stand out.
Most paints manufactured with opaque pigments, rather than transparent.
>>
>>6373261
There's acrylic gouache, Liquitex one allows it to create impasto effects since it doesn't self-level, it's more matte acrylic than gouache. There's nothing worse than the shine and gloss from acrylics, it's where the plastic look comes from.
>>
>>6373374
Yeah but those are formulated to be opaque, so they don't do a great job with emulating watercolour.
>>
>>6373664
Liquitex inks are transparent but they're expensive. Golden Fluid and High-flow are also suitable for that.
>>
Does Old Holland have lead its non lead whites? I just noticed that both my titanium and zinc white have warnings saying they contain lead but the website says nothing about it.
Are they made in the same room and need to have labels in case of contamination or something?
>>
I feel like testing out glass dip pens, any recommendations for a brand? Would prefer a thick pen like copic classics.
>>
>>6369769
>holbein
>cheapest in EU
yeah, paying more for tiny tube of meme nipponese gouache when two 50ml jars of talens gouache cost almost the same.
>>
anyone do egg tempera painting?
>>
>>6374237
trace amount found commonly with zinc. nothing to worry about.
don't use paint with zinc. it cracks.
>>
>>6374304
Talens jars are almost never full, mine often come at half and some come with weird odors like baby talcum smell. Holbein is much better in terms of pigment load too, I still prefer W&N as they don't go overboard with the expensive pigments.
>>
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>>6374304
Out of the manufacturers that manufacture their paint without fillers (Or that I thought did at the time: I guess you can crop the list to M.Graham and Schmincke).

Holbein also actually contains Gum Arabic instead of whatever shit Talens uses. Dextrose I think? You also need to buy Talens in jars, because it separates a lot and mixing it with a stick in the tubes is a pain. The deeper hues are also basically regular watercolour, with how little pigment they have. Also probably not a problem for everyone, but lightfastness is on Talens is dubious.
>>
>>6374368
Really? That sucks, I've been using a titanium+zinc white but I'll guess I'll switch to straight titanium from now on.
Can you recommend a better transparent white, or am I going to have to bite the bullet and buy lead white if I want that?
>>
>>6375078

Michael Harding makes a colour that's called Warm white as a substitute for Lead white. Lead white is a banned pigment here in my nanny state but I can buy Warm white. I trust in Harding's skills as a colourman. By the way, just HOW dangerous is Lead white if you don't grind it yourself? For example are you in trouble if you get it on your skin while painting?
>>
>>6375078
if lead is only a trace element in zinc, imagine how little is in titanium wtth 2-5% zinc. painting with cadmium colors is so much more dangerous at that point.
there's a number of inert pigments that are mostly transparent in the average layer of oil paint you can add to make any pigment more transparent.
calcium carbonate (chalk, egg shells, marble, limestone), silica (crushed glass, pumice, silica-rich sand, quartz). calcium carbonate is safer because silica can damage lungs much more. make a paint mixing the transparent pigment with oil to a consistency you like and add it to your tube paint, or add chalk directly and add oil if it is too lean.
>>
>>6375089
>By the way, just HOW dangerous is Lead white if you don't grind it yourself? For example are you in trouble if you get it on your skin while painting?
Not in quantities you'd use if it happens a couple of times, but over time you could get yourself in trouble. Lead doesn't really leave your body basically ever once it gets in. By itself, anyway: you can get rid of most of it with Dimercaprol.

If you get it in your food somehow, either by having it in your fingers (Even if it's so little as to not show clearly) or clothes or whatever, that's actually bad. That's why it's recommended to use gloves (Nitrile only: Latex can get dissolved by oil/solvents) and to never eat/drink while in the studio if working with lead white.

Mostly it's a case of "better safe than sorry", but there's genuine long-term health risks that many underestimate.
>>
So, has anyone here made their own paints? Feeling like ordering a bunch of crap from Kremer. Is it a pain or do you get decently quick at it?
>>
>>6367918
Acrylic fag painter here. Wdym special medium oil paint and what does that have anything to do with acrylic? I just apply thin paint on 220 gsm drawing paper. It works fine. Just do not blend when you work with either goauche, acrylic or oil.
>>
>>6376843
you can tube them put them in containers, maybe with a bit of walnut oil on top.
if you like fresh paint, you can get better at gauging how much of the paint you need in a session or two, such as strong tinting pigments or ones that are used in small areas, and grind those smaller portions less.
>>
Is 100% cotton watercolor durable than 50%cotton one for storage? I refer the 50% one because it dry faster but storage is another problem.
>>
anyone do printmaking with traditional materials?
should i size my papers strongly so that the oil-based ink does not penetrate into the fibers?
>>
>>6377011
they should both outlive you if they are acid-free, but if we're talking about true museum archivability, you want 100% cotton or better.
>>
>>6377027
Thanks, i will continue on 50%
>>
File: iaekPM[1].gif (1.37 MB, 320x240)
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semi-related
what's a good travel-art set?
mostly want something that can hold a lot of supplies and that I can do my sketches on
>>
>>6377075
Nothing beat your old big fabric bag. But if you want a box like your pic, choose a cheap plastic one since traveling can damage them, especially when fly.
>>
>>6377075
are you to be sitting in a museum, or doing a plein air? what do you want to draw or paint with?
>>
>>6377009
I was thinking of making Casein / Egg Tempera, which don't last very long. Casein could last for months at room temp (as finished paint) though, so might be worth tubing.
>>
>>6377508
for egg tempera you can grind the pigments in distilled water and then keep them dispersed in water as a paste, but sometimes mold can grow.
i do egg tempera without grinding and it seems to be alright. I mull with the palette knife a small amount of mixture at a time with water only, adding only a small amount of water at a time. Maybe that's enough for such small amount that can't even be worked with a muller.
I have a separate surface for mixing the paste with egg yolk medium.
i have also seen others have separate pools of paint with the medium,
>>
>>6377540
Thanks anon. I like to work on pretty big surfaces (hence the desire to make my own paints) so probably not a major issue with not being able to work with a muller. I have indeed seen people just mix with a knife in videos.

Richeson's casein medium seems to last indefinitely at room temp? I guess that's because it's oil emulsion? Is there a recipe for that? I assume it's linseed/walnut oil and casein, with maybe preservatives?
>>
>>6378010
i don't know enough about casein to say how to make casein paint that stores well.
i say just go for the dry pigments since you have interest in multiple medium so it will save money.
you can also vary how much you mull a pigment for different effects in the same medium, something that is more limited with prepared paint.
>>
I've been drawing with a random 2b pencil just for sketching and I find it's good for all purpose stuff, can anyone recommend or vouch for other pencils that are good individually? I don't mind if I have to buy a set just to get it, ideally i'd prefer a one in all but it's ok to have a hard and soft pencil separate, or even an average hard and soft
>>
how can i press my own linseed oil using ancient technology in the small scale?
>>
>>6382618
If you want cheap pencil, Staedtler have the yellow pencil for student which is the best as student grade
Mid range is Koh I nooh yellow pencils. If you want to start drawing photo realism
The best overal in term of quality and cost is Faber-Castell, smooth blending, the lead is hard to break, soft wood so you can easily sharpening with a knife. You should buy this instead of Koh I nooh if you occasionally break your lead.
>>
>>6367918
How long should a paintbrush last if I use it every day? Three months seems kind of short
>>
>>6383690
Feel like forever if you take care of them. I have used my cheap chinese brush for a year and it still as good as news. There are artist who use one brush for their whole life.
>>
>>6383690
it depends on the bristles, how you use them, an how you clean them.
you can make them last a long time with proper care. mix with a palette knife rather than the brush. don't use solvents to clean them.
>>
>>6383717
>>6383744
Maybe I should be nicer to my tools. The stiffness and spring from when I first got it are all gone I might need to get a new one. It's a synthetic round brush but not a cheap one btw
>>
>>6383889
Synthetic should be cheap. 1$ made in China synthetic brush can last for years.
>>
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>>6383889
Well, if your brush is too expensive and you don't want to throw it away, try picrel. It is for after painting but maybe able to clean dry paint.
>>
>>6383690
Depending on the medium. Watercolor or oil? Forever, or very close to it. Acrylic? Years.

>>6383889
Wash it properly with soap and then reshape it using hot water. Let dry. If even this doesn't work you gotta get that glue they add to brushes at the stores to make them stay pointy, and use that to let the brush dry to the correct shape, wait for a day or so, and then rinse the glue out.
>>
>>6383672
thanks
>>
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>>6382618
>Staedtler Mars Technico 780C Mechanical Lead holder
>Staedtler 502 BK A6 Mars Rotary Action Lead Pointer
And leads in various degrees of hardness is the drawing gigachad masterrace mode.
>>
You guys in these threads helped me a while back to find good lead for my sketchbook pencil, appreciated it. Anyone know what the best sealant is to preserve the sketchbook pages from smudging over time? I had a can of stuff from my art classes back in college that was recommended by the teacher. Pic related. But it didn't really hold any of my charcoal work even when it was fresh, and I did multiple applications. I don't want to spray my sketchbook pages with it if I can get something better.
>>
>>6385133
Get the black version for extra stealth.
>>
>>6385133
I love mine! Also gotta vouch for the Graphgear 500 as far as mechanical pencils go.
>>
>>6377508
If you have good quality tube watercolors like Holbein, get an egg, take the yolk, pierce it, let the inside run into a cup, add water, mix it, now put your watercolor colors on a palette, then dip the brush on the egg mixture and mix it on the paints on the palette., there you go.
>>
>>6385716
Have you tried wait for more time. You need to wait at least 30 mins after it dry for the full effect.
I only know Winsor and Newton professional as better fixative not sure about others.
>>
>>6386648
I could try it, I figure it will hold pencil better than charcoal regardless. But I'm also looking for something more permanent, I'm not going to go back and work on the pages anymore so maybe i could use a regular can of clear coat paint. My paper is pretty flimsy though, it could handle maybe marker but not paint. I wouldn't want to melt it with a spray that's too wet or that spreadable varnish stuff.
>>
on the topic of fixative, has anyone tried more traditional methods of fixing dry media? mainly for the harder ones, not loose like soft pastels. egg white was one, but a bit vague. is it egg white simply beaten and mixed with water or egg glaire that may be mixed with some other things? rabbit skin glue seem like it would work, and so would gum arabic or tragacanth. some spray fixatives use casein, so it might work in brushed liquid solution as well. this is all provided the drawing is secure enough not to be disturbed by brushing or dipping.

as for spray fixatives i found this comparative experiment
https://www.jacksonsart.com/blog/2014/08/29/fixatives-are-not-all-the-same/
>>
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>>6385718
>Graphgear 500
This! Although I prefer the extra weight of the 1000. I also love Uni's Kuru Toga. It has a mechanism that slightly rotates the lead each time you put it to paper so the point of the lead is maintained.
>>
>>6387743
Very helpful link, thanks
>>
Does anyone have a desk lamp they would recommend? Ideally under 100 euro. But if there is a really good one I will pay more.
>>
>>6388083
i like the ones long ones attached to the wall more because i have more space. unless one prefers the flexibility of being able to move the light around.
>>
>>6383904
I can vouch for this. I give my old brushes to my kids to use and my daughter left one in acrylic--stiff as a board. Three or four washes with this soap got rid of the paint (the bristles were stained, but functional) and then leaving a layer of the soap on the bristles overnight before giving it a final rinse helps condition and restore the brush. It's worth the money to have.
>>
Anyone have a favorite brand of ballpoint or rollerball pen? I've never found one that doesn't gout out a blob of ink right when I don't want it to.

>>6371672
You should throw it out because it's had the vile touch of a Californian on it.
>>
>>6388083
a lamp is a lamp 90% of the time
if you just need one for light, get one of those LED lamps. personally, led bulbs strain my eyes over long periods of exposure, so I just got one that uses regular light bulbs

if you're planning on painting, though, definitely go for as close to natural light as you can
i think they make bulbs that mimic natural light, but nothing beats the real thing
>>
>>6377295
at the moment, I'm not planning on diving deep into colors or paints yet
mostly need something that can hold pencils and pens. also helps if i can use it to hold up my sketchpad at a decent angle
>>
>>6389928
just use your pockets/a man bag and hold your sketchbook.
but i find having a larger board to place the paper or sketchbook on is better because you can rest the board on your body and have the paper closer to the top edge of the board for more comfort.
if you use a dip pen, you can put a sponge in a small ink well, and this sponge saturated with ink but not enough that it will spill when tipped over.
>>
Whats the difference between using linseed oil vs paint thinner for thinning oil paints?
Everything I can find online seems to talk about them interchangeably, is there a reason to use one over the other?
>>
>>6390809
+linseed oil makes the paint have more oil (oil to pigment ratio increases) slower drying, more gloss, not as easy to paint over dry, harder for atmospheric vapors and moisture to penetrate, more yellowing, more flexible, used for glazes
+paint thinner makes makes the oil thinner (oil to pigment ratio remains the same but effectively lower since it also breaks down oil) leaner and thinner paint layer, more matte surface, pigment can be unbound if thinned too much, more susceptible to dirt and moisture penetration due to microscopic pores, faster drying, mostly used for under layers
>>
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Is there a burnt umber watercolor that isn't faint? I only have Holbein and it's quite light.
>>
is there such a thing as waiting too long before doing the traditional rsg gesso/calcium carbonate ground on a wooden panel that is already sized? have some panels that i forgot about, already sized.
what about a lead oil ground?
>>
>>6385717
I don't subscribe to BLACKED

>>6390809
The renaissance painters just used oil, and so did most people for a fair bit after. Modern painters use way more thinner. Do with that information what you will.

>>6391057
Daniel Smith is darker, but most aren't as dark in watercolour as they would be in other media.
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>>6394374
>Daniel Smith is darker, but most aren't as dark in watercolour as they would be in other media.
That's a shame, Holbein's is really that light and faint, guess I'll have to use gouache for those earth colors.
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>>6394418
Just go a shade darker. Basically go for Van Dyke Brown where you'd use Burnt Umber, or so. That can get you pretty dark.
In general you can get very dark tones in watercolour, but those are usually synthetic pigments or mixes of two or more pigments that cancel each other out.
Or straight up black paint, but that's generally a bad idea in my experience.
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>>6394495
I used to use Shin Han Pass but now I can't order them anymore since they only have Jackson's in Europe. Their Van Dyke and Burn Umber were pretty good in terms of having good coverage but they're a hybrid gouache/ watercolor so not really top quality paints.
Holbein is great but their watercolor browns are so light, even Van Dyke, only exception is raw umber which is amazing.
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>>6394374
Renaissance painters also painted with hand-ground paint and often used oils that were heated with lead dryers.
But even with modern tube paints, thinners are not necessary. I use it but usually limited to imprimatura when covering large surface.
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>>6391057
Da Vinci burnt umber is quite nice. Cheap too if
you live near the US. It's more warm than cool
which is something consider though.
>>
Any thoughts on usage of Gamblin's Solvent free gel/fluid? It seems to be made out of safflower oil primarily. I picked up both to try as a nontoxic alternative to odorless mineral spirits but haven't tested them out yet.
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Ordered tubes of cadmium red, yellow and orange paint. More expensive than I'm used to for 37ml. Hopefully the colors will be awesome. Anything to mind about the toxicity? Got nitrile gloves but will prob get it on me by accident at some point. Hoping it's safe enough and can't destroy me like white lead paint.
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>>6394737
it's not an alternative to thinners. it's more of an alternative to fluid and gel mediums like sunthickened linseed oil or maroger medium. while thinners lower the oil content, fluid and gel mediums increase the oil content.
one should not use too much thinner because pigments lose binder.
one should not use too much fluid/gel medium because the pigments have too much binder and can cause problems like wrinkling or yellowing depending on the medium.
>>
>>6394756
Aren't thinners and fluid/gel both used in order to increase the "flow" of the oil paint? When does one get used over the other?
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>>6394969
>>6390921
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Anyone have experience with Pentel pony hair brush? This is the only natural hair brush in my local store. Mainly about shredding.
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>>6394745
Cadmium won't do much to you unless you pull a Gogh and start eating your paints. It will absolutely destroy aquatic life though, so don't pour your paints into a fish tank.
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>>6395228
Robert McGinnis is still alive at over 90 and he used cadmiums all his life, I think they exaggerate the human cancer dangers, maybe it really is terrible for the environment but now there's cad-free alternatives, for the same high price...
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does anyone know how to make verdigris, malachite, and azurite more stable in oil/egg tempera?
i read about coating malachite and azurite in protein so it doesn't react with oil. does this truly prevent browning?
i don't have venice turpentine to make the copper resinate with verdirgris. will coating it in protein work as well?
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>>6395245
>cad-free alternatives
Dang, should've looked this up. Would've preferred getting these to be safer. Next time I suppose, prob won't be too hard to not snack on my 37ml tubes until then.
>>
Is Nikko-Tachikawa G nib the same as old Nikko G? I ran out of my supply but there are no more Nikko G available because Tachikawa bought them.
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>>6397376
You think that but the hunger strikes suddenly and can be vicious. You can be fairly safe from eating your paints if you maintain a healthy diet, but never 100% safe.
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>>6397848
>no more Nikko G available because Tachikawa bought them.
Am I missing something here?
As for as I know all the places that I buy from still has Nikko G mind in stock and the Tachikawa G nib is a separate product. I've also never heard that tachikawa bought out Nikko
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>>6398298
Well, shopa owner explained that to me. They said it is the same, just add the name Tachikawa on it. Maybe I should buy 2 nibs first before decide
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>>6398300
>They said it is the same, just add the name Tachikawa on it.
From what I know they're slightly different. The experienced calligraphers I know typically say that the Tachikawa is a tad more flexible then the Nikko counterpart but it's probly not something an amateur can tell. I can't say for myself since I hate and never use G nibs.
>>
>>6397848
Pretty sure you can still get them on Amazon or whatever.
>>
What are my options for inking if I don't like the idea of regularly having to buy felt tip pens? A G-pen perhaps?
I'm clueless and would appreciate opinions, as I normally only use pencils/charcoals.
>>
>>6399981
G pen is good option if you don't like fineliner. Maru nibs is an option for thinner lines. Dip pen need a lot of practice and kinda messy at first. Stick with Japanese brands.
Also try to use brush and ink, the only problem is they can't really use waterproof ink, otherwise it's pretty flexible.
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>>6399981
Brushes and brush pens can be a bit difficult to get used to since you feel much less contact with the surface, but they're a lot of fun. Definitely the most versatile mark-making wise, but it takes a bit of practice to be able to do very fine detail work with them.
Pic related is great since you can control how much ink is loaded on it for drybrush effects and stuff, unlike the Pentel Pocket Brush which is always wet (which makes it a bit more difficult to handle, too).
Dip pens aren't bad choices either, but they also take some getting used to. Just wanted to mention brushes since I feel like they're a bit overlooked these days which is a shame.
Waterproof ink gives brushes a shorter lifespan, but it's not that big of a deal. Pen nibs break and brushes eventually lose their point, but you'll still probably go through them much slower than fineliners.
>>
>>6400006
>>6400024
I don't mind steep learning curves, I'm willing to fail and learn.
I had wondered about brushes as well so I appreciate the recommendation. I'm thinking of using ink to do delicate work mostly, but I'm curious about experimenting more gestural/dynamic type of stuff with ink as well.
Thanks for the replies, I'll look into all of this.
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>>6400172
Cheers, Anon.
One thing I forgot to mention were fountain pens. They're not really drawing tools, but if you like doodling with a fixed line width and think you'd miss the fineliner's ease of use where you just pick up the pen and draw, it might be a good idea to get a cheap one with a stiff nib like a Pilot Kakuno to see if you like them. To me, at least, they fill all the fineliner use cases with none of the tragic lifespan.
The downside is that their ink tends to bleed and feather on things like printer paper, but if you're using ink you'd usually go for heavier paper anyway.
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>>6372892
50% cotton means half the cotton
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>>6372892
Yes, you need 100% cotton paper if youre going to to do any work of quality and that which you intend to either preserve or sell. Practice is alright i guess for 50% cotton but I dont even use it anymore. I buy whole sheets of arches and cut it down to size for sketchbooks and such. Buying the whole sheets is ultimately cheaper than the arches blocks and I think its easier than trying to carefully pry the page off the block.

It is important to buyers, yes. You shouldn't sell someone something that isn't going to hold up over time. This also includes you using artist grade watercolors that have good light fastness instead of cheap student grade watercolors.

You should really kina know these things before you start selling product. You need to do your homework.
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>>6377032
pleb tier, do not buy pony hair brushes. IF youre looking for watercolor a cheap but nice brand is Princeton's Neptune series. The two I would purchase would be a size 6 round and an 8 quill. You could also get their mottler if youre big into washes but a standard pony hake brush at the store would do fine
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>>6401205
other anon
i only use cotton for works that are not water color, but just for sketching.
but i wonder if buyers even care. i can use the most expensive pigments in my paintings that are specifically prepared but up to a certain point most don't even understand why it matters. i think it's a reflection of artists generally not caring as much as well. maybe it's different for water color buyers because it's simply expected that you paint on cotton.
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>>6400922
Hey that's a good idea. I haven't used one in over a decade but I was regularly using them back in school. That'd be fun to try again. Thanks.
>>
>>6372228
>>6372142
alex tzavares has a good video on transparent vs opaque on youtube
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hello. anyone use Winsor Newton Cotman, Van Gogh, Mungyo Professional or SAKURA Koi here? I'd love some advices & reviews (i dont trust youtube). Want to buy one as a xmas gift for my sis but idk which one to pick since i am not an artist.. Thanks.
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>>6402409
I use Sakura Koi to colour in line drawings and they're good for comic/anime-like things where you don't really need to layer and render a lot, but it would probably not hold up all that well for actual paintings. The colours are nice and mix well, but they're not lightfast so they're better for using in a sketchbook or drawings that'll stay tucked away in something like a portfolio (since they'll fade otherwise. Lightfastness is something to look out for if she displays or sells her work).
I'd say it depends on what she does. If she's mainly interested in drawing then Sakura Koi is a good choice, since it's a bit more casual, but if she's a painter then definitely go with professional paints instead.
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https://paintinggal.com/can-acrylic-paint-cause-cancer-risks-and-precautions/

><Cadmium is a common element in artist pigments. Cadmium colors are usually opaque and essential colors for most artists. Some colors containing cadmium are reds, yellows, and oranges.

>Cadmium is a type I carcinogen (Source), which means it is known to cause cancer in humans. It causes a risk of cancer when inhaled more than 0.05 µg/day. Therefore cadmium containing paint should not be used for spraying, airbrushing, or scuffing the dry paint due to the risk of inhalation.

>Ingestion of cadmium pigments should also be avoided. Cadmiums are also known in the state of Califonia to cause developmental and male reproductive toxicity.

Don't go around eating paint:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_jr7yOOZM4
>>
>>6402484
i see i'll go to store and ask them more about it tomorrow.
>I'd say it depends on what she does
she does the anime cartoon thingy most of the time, so i guess it's the right pick then. thank you again.
>>
>>6402409
If you or your sis don't mind Russian product, White night is the most cost efficient artist grade. It definitely worth more than what you lists.
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>>6402592
>Russian product
oh nah anything's fine, but im kinda low on budget so i i can only afford her student-grade art supplies.
Anyways, I'll check it out, thank you!.
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>>6402597
White night is as expensive as sakura koi with double the amount. Plus the pigment is more intensive so you actually save more paint.
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>>6402409
I use Cotman paints, the ones in a pan. I'm happy with them, and they're apparently lightfast too. Here's my latest work with them.
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Anyone have advice on acrylic and how to handle it for large pieces? I'm using a flow medium but kinda shitty hobby Lobby quality paint (I usually paint in oil) that feels like heavy body maybe a bit less (creamy texture) and I think the brush is very important so I used a nylon but it is that the best technique to cover large areas like on a 20x20 to avoid brushstrokes?
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>>6403059
I paint with acrylics on 150x100cm canvas most of the time and I like using rollers for even layers on my background color and big flat brushes for medium sized shapes.
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>>6402597
I'm going to second that white nights rec. Good paints for a good price.
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>>6403059
Any self leveling acrylic will do like acrylic gouache.
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>>6402592
>>6402603
>>6403069
Not that anon, but are you guys talking about watercolor brands here?



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