[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vm / vmg / vr / vrpg / vst / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / pw / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / vt / wsg / wsr / x / xs] [Settings] [Search] [Mobile] [Home]
Board
Settings Mobile Home
/ic/ - Artwork/Critique


Thread archived.
You cannot reply anymore.


[Advertise on 4chan]


File: Branding-3-3715142412.jpg (117 KB, 1200x750)
117 KB
117 KB JPG
How much thought should go into branding?
>>
>>7167753
This far: https://www.creativebloq.com/news/never-forget-that-utterly-ridiculous-pepsi-logo-design-document
>>
>>7168058
erf, I meant
> This much

but y'all forgive me
>>
>>7167753
A lot, because that's how people are going to recognize you. That's why banding can be very good money.
>>
>>7168058
>>7168059
Took a design class, my professor helped develop the concept of email on a visual design level. He spoke on how this most likely was a sham and they most likely had the redesign first then tried to intellectualize it for justification
I sorta agree with him, but sorta don't. But I'm now skeptical of this
>>
>>7168103
Most of the 'justifications' or meaning behind a logo strikes me as a shame. Just say it's a good picture! Logos are essentially just the equivalent to a player avatar portrait in a videogame, they're not deep.
Nobody is looking at the McDonalds logo and thinking about how the M represents a bridge helping close the divide between people or some shit.
Though I can understand WHY they do this, big corpos need to pretend they're not shallow money grubs, and thus wants a 'deep' important logo.



[Advertise on 4chan]

Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.