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Bell showcases High-Speed Vertical Takeoff and Landing (HSVTOL) technology capabilities upon completion of testing efforts at Holloman Air Force Base. The team has utilized the Holloman High Speed Test Track to demonstrate the folding rotor, integrated propulsion and flight control technologies at representative flight speeds. https://youtu.be/htBDBH6p5RA

Previously
DARPA SPRINT X-Plane: This Time It's Biblical
https://desuarchive.org/k/thread/60513937
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>>60914030
pretty neat
>>
Cool!
Folding prop / HSVTOL seems like one of those advances that's obvious in hindsight, but I can see why it's taken a while to reach this stage.

Slight hijack - what were the main things that prevented the Osprey and its ilk from being developed earlier?
Was it advances in engine tech, power trasmission/couplings, or something more esoteric that I'm forgetting?
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>>60914551
It was developed quite early.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transcendental_Model_1-G

They just didn't get into service for a long time because they're complicated, expensive, unreliable and unstable. Which, in case you haven't noticed, is true for the V-22 as well, the USMC just doesn't give a fuck.
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how many marine will eaten by this death trap
waste of resource
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>60914709
retard
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>>60914709
Shut Up
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There's not much of a point to this thing when the Valor has already been designed and finalised.
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>>60915287
It's just in time for the tiltrotor Chinook and C-130 replacements though.
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>>60914551
Kek, I had this idea a while ago and guess I should have patented it. Or even testing it on a drone or something. Or anything at all really.
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>>60914030
>Osprey wasn't ""accidentally"" killing enough people
>Ok let's make the same thing but it goes faster and the prop folds and it goes all jet mode!
Is this some sort of down low blood sacrifice scheme to the plane gods or something?
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>>60915287
I believe it's supposed to primarily be an unmanned drone.
Also, the intent is for a faster craft with more range, hence the jet turbine propulsion once the props fold out of the way.
They're looking for valor but at 700mph.
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>>60914030
Are there any other "HSVTOL" designs out there yet, or is Bell the only one with something at this stage already?
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>>60914030
>We’re still not at the point where we’re going all-jet VTOL for our troop carriers like the Do 31 yet
Sad.
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>>60915287
The Valor is an ugly trannycopter that will never be as pretty as the V-22.
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>>60915287
By the time this tech matures, it will likely be put in as part of a major block upgrade for the Valor or incorporated into whatever replaces it.
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>>60916296
I hate that this is true.
I know valor is better than v22 in my heart, but osprey has the aesthetic edge 100%.
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>>60914030
Jets really only work efficiently above a certain speed. This could pair vertical take off to a small highly efficient jet, very cool.

People always talk about the NSA, CIA or even NASA but if I could explore the secrets of any government organization it would 99% be DARPA and maybe 1% the Council on Foreign Relations. They're up to some shit too.
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>>60914030
Would rather be at a low speed during landing.
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>>60914030
Boeing's proposal is pure kino but i think everyone knows Bell is gonna win
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>>60914030
>on my way to fuck your bitch
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>>60914030
neat, always kinda crazy to see the beginnings of stuff like this, but a part of me feels wary of the complexity like with V-22 and the folding wing.
>>60914709
Here's your (You) that you're so desperate for. How are those CH-53's doing?
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>>60914030
So you need a rotor to get a vehicle launched and a jet to cruise? The jet can't do both?
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>>60914030
I want this but with four engines replacing the chinook. If I can't have twin rotors I want quad rotors.
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>>60916288
The trick is to do it without needing 8 extra engines to takeoff.
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>>60921074
>The jet can't do both?
You would need at least TWO way oversized, heavy, fuel-guzzling and expensive jets to make the whole plane hover, and the jet exhaust would tear up and burn any ground it tried to land on. That is already an issue with the prop wash and exhaust of the V-22, it would be several times worse with two actual jet engines.
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>>60916296
>Unrelated obsession about troons when talking about helicopters
Get help
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>>60921705
>quad rotors.
Fuck it, let's go whole hog and push for eight. If they're electrically driven you don't need to worry about driveshafts, you can just put a rotor wherever you want and make the whole upper half of the transport be a whirling, howling menagerie of horrors.
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why use jelicopter jet when you can just use jet?
also how many marine will die from this flying abination
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>>60922804
in-fact why not just helicopter that flew in 1950 and reliable and not waste many on this project
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>>60922258
Well if it transitions from vertical to level flight..
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>>60922804
this. crysis vtol when?
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>>60916215
The old thread has some more info.
https://desuarchive.org/k/thread/60513937

There's also prior DARPA work, which produced things like Piasecki's ARES – Aerial Reconfigurable Embedded System.
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>>60923255
>>
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>>60915287
This technology is for the designs that come *after* Valor-chan. It'll probably be upwards of 20 years before we see it on anything manned.
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>>60918998
I believe the rough guideline is that turboprops are more efficient below 0.5M, and turbofans are more efficient above 0.5M. Of course, both are also more efficient the larger the diameter they have.
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>>60923255
Thanks anon, much appreciated.
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Waste of money given Russia's performance.
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>>60927810
I doubt seriously it's intended for Russia.
It's pretty great for regions where you might have multiple island chains way too small to build legitimate runways or even larger landing pads on, however...
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>>60927783
Should I add the original contenders list? There were 11 or 12 before they went to 4.
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>>60923255
it's so retarded but I love modular support/logistics vehicles so it's also sexy, it's like a downie with fat knockers doing a strip tease
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>>60925423
I love having a reference library.
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bupp
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>>60928589
Sure, lay it on me.
I've got to have something to look at when I'm dead and doing nothing at work today.
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>>60914030
>turboprop that goes turbojet
Okay, that is pretty cool.
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>>60914030
that's pretty cool. stowing the blades gives you way better performance envelopes and will let you go way faster more efficiently with the jet engines.
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>>60928834
This graph is impossible to understand. What does it mean when the line goes up?
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>>60931365
>What does it mean when the line goes up?
You buy whatever it is and sell as soon as it dips.
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>>60914669
>they're complicated, expensive, unreliable and unstable. Which, in case you haven't noticed, is true for the V-22 as well
How is that true for the safest rotorcraft by flight hour in service?
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>>60931456
>safest rotorcraft by flight hour in service?
Didn't the plebbit guy who perpetually championed the safety record of the v22 get smited by the osprey in a crash in Japan like two months ago?
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>>60931365
In short, the higher the line, the more fuel you burn to get the thrust needed to maintain the speed you are at.

It shows at low (sub 0.5 mach) propellers will use less fuel to maintain that thrust than a jet, but as speed increases the fuel consumption goes exponential, and jets become more economical.
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>>60914030
I feel like this thing could be drastically simplified if you moved the props to the rear of the wing, mounted the wing higher, and had the propellers rotate downwards for vtol along with a section of the wing or something.
I guess it would increase chances for groundstrike, but you could just have wing tip stanchions or something to prevent blades from getting too close to earth.
Then you wouldn't need to have the whole "stop the rotation of the blades mid-flight before folding around the wing" complication of the mechanism to deal with.
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>>60931567
Yeah he was team lead on the Japan crash that basically was the last straw causing them all to be grounded.
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>>60933481
Fleets are always grounded after a crash, zoomer.
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>>60933493
Full grounding across all types/variants for four months with no schedule known for getting them operating again is a bit much for a platform already in service for almost 17 years.
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>>60928834
If I'm reading this right, probably not, it's saying that all props are more efficient than jets at speeds below 3/4 mach.
If that is true, wouldn't passenger planes all use props to save money?

ps. I'm assuming a fan is prop and a turbojet is a jet.
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>>60933717
>wouldn't passenger planes all use props to save money?
There are a lot of other variables at play in terms of large scale craft like airliners, but yeah, generally that's why you don't see small economy craft with turbines.
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>>60928834
Thanks; so, for low-bypass fans, they bypass (bah-dum-tsh) turboprops at 0.5M, while high-bypass fans pull ahead at 0.4M.

I also didn't realize that high-bypass got wildly inefficient at trans-sonic speeds, or that low-bypass was worse than Ye Ole Turbojets about 1.6M. Or that pistons are actually more efficient than turboprops at Cessna speeds (I wonder if the power/weight of the engine makes up for some of that).
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>>60933717
No, a fan is a turbojet with a large fan in front that blows air around the core of the engine. That's what the "bypass" is all about; low-bypass means that the fan (also called Stage 0) is less than twice the diameter of the core, while high-bypass means that the fan is more than twice the diameter of the core.

Take a look at the diagrams in this wiki link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airbreathing_jet_engine
Note how the fan blows air through what looks like a sleeve around the turbojet that forms the core of a turbofan. If a way, a turbofan is kinda like a ducted turboprop, using tiny, tightly-packed fan blades rather than conventional propeller blades. A turbofan also runs much cooler than a turbojet, thanks to all of the bypass air; this helps to reduce the wear and tear on the engine compared to a turbojet.

Practically everything built today is a turbofan. There is little or not benefit to *not* having a Stage 0 fan, unless you're talking about something like a Blackbird that *prefers* to cruise around at around Mach 3 (refer to the above graph). Since even fighters spend most of their lives maneuvering at high-subsonic speeds, they'll always be better off with a turbofan, with the bypass ratio based on the available volume within the fuselage, the technology of the engine, and the speeds at which it is intended to be used.
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>>60931150
Wasn't around. Will do shortly.
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>>60931150
Initially Selected Participants in HSVTOL Program

1. American Aerospace Engineering

American Aerospace Engineering (AAE) will work on applying its Eversor aircraft for the HSVTOL program. Though the specifics of its contribution to the HSVTOL program are not immediately available, the White Salmon, Washington-based AAE has described the Eversor as a family of high-speed tandem tiltwing VTOL aircraft with a maximum takeoff weight ranging from 55 lb (25 kg) to 2,500 lb (1,133 kg). The modular Eversor is designed to be pilot optional and could accommodate alternative propulsion systems such as hybrid-electric or battery-electric. AAE has previously received an Air Force Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to build a one-quarter scale version of the Eversor and conduct a flight demonstration.
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2. Astro Aerospace

Astro Aerospace will work on adapting its Horizon Aircraft Cavorite X5 for the HSVTOL program. Astro, which acquired Horizon Aircraft in June 2021, has promoted the Cavorite as an aircraft designed for "speed, stealth, and operational versatility." According to the VFS World eVTOL Aircraft Directory, the hybrid-electric Cavorite X5 features 16 fans embedded in the wing and canard for VTOL flight and one pusher propeller for forward flight. In addition to a pilot, the X5 can carry four passengers. The Cavorite X5 is expected to have a range of 310 miles (500 km) and cruise at 215 mph (350 km/h), although the company's submission for the HSVTOL program may not match the exact specifications of the X5. In a recent interview with Vertiflite, Astro President Brandon Robinson said they wanted to design a machine that met specific mission characteristics and that felt safe. Over the next few months, Astro will work on developing a 50%-scale flying prototype.
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3. Bell

Bell has submitted a concept for a family of HSVTOL aircraft for the AFWERX program. First revealed in August 2021, Bell has described its proposal as a "family of scalable aircraft concepts" ranging from 4,000 lb (1,814 kg) to 100,000 lb (45,359 kg) in gross weight. In all, Bell is studying "30 or 40 concepts" within this family of HSVTOL aircraft, said Nissen. On the low end, the HSVTOL aircraft would be uncrewed and applied to missions such as loyal wing, rescue and logistics. Larger HSVTOL aircraft would be crewed, but still capable of conducting autonomous operations. A critical design characteristic of any Bell HSVTOL, said Nissen, is that they are survivable in contested airspace. Initial systems will be designed with split propulsion — two independent propulsion systems, one for VTOL flight and one for high-speed cruise — though the company is also looking at convertible propulsion systems like that used on the F-35B short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) jet.

Underpinning this system is the company's folding rotor hardware technology and digital flight control systems that will enable the transition from turboprop to jet modes. Bell announced in February that it had demonstrated a full-scale prototype of its fold-away rotor technology, one that it developed based on a digital design. In a series of tests in December, Bell evaluated the hardware and software required to perform a conversion from turboprop to jet mode. The tests, said Nissen in a statement, brought the company closer to its plans to conduct an integrated demonstration of the folding rotor technology in 2022.
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4. Continuum Dynamics

Continuum Dynamics, Inc., (CDI) will apply its new design and actuation technology to developing a Variable Diameter Tiltrotor (VDTR) for the HSVTOL program. The resulting aircraft will be scalable to a wide range of Air Force and SOCOM missions, said CDI in a Feb. 16 press release, and will meet the hover lift and speed requirements of the HSVTOL challenge. Unlike a conventional tiltrotor aircraft, a VDTR can maintain full rotor speed during cruise flight by retracting or extending the rotor blades. For Phase 1 of the HSVTOL program, CDI has teamed with AVX Aircraft, an innovator in VTOL technology and a frequent partner of CDI on VTOL projects. Initially, AVX will work on the design and analysis of hub, rotor and associated controls, though the collaboration is expected to expand in later phases of the program.
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5. Jaunt

Jaunt Air Mobility will develop two conceptual designs for the HSVTOL program. The aircraft will incorporate Jaunt's patented slowed rotor compound (SRC) technology, which slows the helicopter's main rotor speed to allow for higher forward speeds. The result, said Jaunt, is a lift-to-drag ratio five times better than that of a helicopter. The first proposed design is based on the Multi-mission Air Vehicle 55 (MAV55), a conceptual 11,000-lb (5,000-kg) hybrid-electric aircraft with a 12-passenger capacity. Using a powertrain developed by VerdeGo Aero and featuring GE Aviation's Catalyst engine, the MAV55 could reach speeds of 270 kt (500 km/h) and a range of 1,610 miles (2,591 km). At the same time, the company is developing a proposal for a second aircraft with more capability and a target of 2030, said Jaunt COO Jesse A. Crispino in an email to Vertiflite. The HSVTOL program is the latest collaboration between Jaunt and the Air Force; the Dallas-based company has already completed three Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) contracts for AFWERX (see "Stamping Out Air Taxis," Vertiflite, May/June 2021).
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6. Jetoptera

Jetoptera will work on an HSVTOL aircraft system with adaptive fluid propulsion for the AFWERX program. The Edmonds, Washington-based company said in a Feb. 7 press release that it has partnered with Northrop Grumman and Pratt & Whitney for Phase 1 of the program. The company advertises its patented adaptive Fluid Propulsive System (FPS) — which uses P&W turboshaft engines to drive air compressors required by the thrusters — as offering significant weight and fuel savings compared to conventional turbofan or turboprop engines. Northrop Grumman will work with Jetoptera to design an airframe for an HSVTOL demonstrator that will integrate the FPS propulsors. Jetoptera's selection for the HSVTOL program builds on two Air Force STTR contracts awarded in March 2021 for work on fluid propulsion systems.

"The neat thing about our concept is that for high-speed cruise, we are relying on turbofans already proven to deliver the required thrust for jet speeds in level flight," Dr. Andrei Evulet, CEO of Jetoptera, said in an email to Vertiflite. "Choosing the right powerplant and employing the same turbofans as the source of motive air for our FPS for the vertical take-off, hover and vertical landing and the unique integration with the airframe make our solution very feasible."
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7. Piasecki

Piasecki Aircraft Corporation will work on developing its PA-1459 HSVTOL concept air vehicle in Phase 1 of the AFWERX program. A digital rendering of the PA-1459 shows an aircraft with two aft-mounted turbofan engines with vectoring exhausts and two tilting ducted propellers for vertical lift. All four can provide vectored thrust through 90° for vertical or super-short takeoff and landing (SSTOL) operations as well as high-speed forward flight. The low-drag fuselage of the PA-1459 is designed to achieve the high speeds demanded by the AFWERX mission and incorporates a loading ramp. The morphing ducted thruster maintains the high thrust to power ratio to effect efficient hover and low-speed maneuver while sustaining the high propulsive efficiencies in cruise. A multi-speed drive system coupled with multiple convertible gas turbines allow distribution of power to electrical generators, ducted propellers and vectored thrust from the gas turbines. Control is achieved through control laws derived from the Piasecki ARES project to provide high control power in all axes and a generous center of gravity envelope needed for a transport type aircraft. Optimization of cruise flight is achieved through Piasecki's ADAPT flight control algorithm.
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8. Transcend Air

Transcend Air, a Boston-based developer of high-speed VTOL aircraft, will develop the V-500 Catamount. The Catamount is a militarized version of Transcend's civil Vy 400 HSVTOL, which the company is developing for city-to-city VIP travel. Instead of the Vy 400's GE CT7-8 engines (a civil derivative of the T700), the V-500 will use GE T901 turboshafts, allowing it to reach a cruise speed of 435 kt (805 km/h) and combat radius of up to 720 miles (1,157 km). Transcend has partnered with Kaman Aerospace to build both the six-seat Vy 400, a subscale flight test model of which was displayed at the VFS Transformative Vertical Flight 2022 meeting in January (see "TVF2022: Vehicles and Volts," pg. 42), and the V-500 Catamount. In a Jan. 28 press release, Transcend said the V-500 will take just 15 minutes to dash 100 nautical miles, which "could increase aircrew recovery rates by up to 70%."
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9. Valkyrie

Valkyrie Systems Aerospace (VSA) will develop an HSVTOL based on its Guardian HoverJet. The conceptual Guardian HoverJet has a maximum takeoff weight of 16,000 lb (7,258 kg) and useful load of 2,000 lb (907 kg). The Guardian's two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW545C turbofans allow it to reach speeds of up to 390 kt (723 km/h) and fly for up to 15 hours using maximum fuel. The Guardian is one of two HoverJet designs currently under development at the company; the Eagle HoverJet is an uncrewed miniature version of the Guardian designed for cargo delivery. Both the Guardian and Eagle incorporate a stream-lined, stealthy design and can be operated in aircraft, hovercraft and amphibious modes. "In this next phase, we are looking to develop our solution and concept further to provide [USSOCOM] as well as the US Air Force, the research necessary towards delivering a conceptual design that fits their needs and satisfies the competition," Steve Tafoya, VSA managing partner, said in a Dec. 9 press release.
>>
10. VerdeGo Aero

VerdeGo Aero is leveraging technologies developed in its VH-3-185 hybrid diesel-electric powerplant program to develop a much more powerful multi-megawatt turbine hybrid-electric powerplant for the HSVTOL program. In a Jan. 31 press release, the Daytona Beach, Florida-based company said that it will work with airframers in the HSVTOL program to ensure that the new VerdeGo powerplant meets the needs of aircraft designed for these mission requirements. "VerdeGo has already proven our capability in sub-1-MW hybrid powerplants, and this award publicly confirms we are developing larger-scale fully integrated turbine-hybrid solutions as well," David Eichstedt, director of advanced concepts at VerdeGo, said in the press release.
>>
11. Whisper

Whisper Aero will work on an electric quiet propulsor for the HSVTOL program, though the Tennessee-based company has been silent on the specifics of its proposal. It could resemble a previous collaboration between AFWERX and Whisper; in December 2020, AFWERX awarded the company a contract for work on a low-noise, high-power electric propulsor. According to the abstract for that SBIR project, the eQ Propulsor has an "innovative architecture that enables electric motors to achieve high specific power at low disk loading — yet with low tip speeds to achieve very low acoustic signatures." It is not clear if Whisper's contribution to the HSVTOL program will resemble its past work for AFWERX.

Last one.
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Best thread on /k/
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>>60923255
>>60923279
Ducted fans are cool as fuck. Removing the Fenestron from the Invictus is what got FARA cancelled. Dumbass engineers forgetting to make their aircraft cool enough.
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bump
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>>60940203
Unfortunately, they're also heavy, especially when scaled up. And for VTOL applications, larger blades are far superior to smaller ones.
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>>60943879
As far as I know, multiple smaller engines are lighter and more efficient than one large one, at least with jets. I assume ducted fans are similar. Downsides are reliability and cost of course, but things seem to be improving fairly quickly in that regard.
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>>60933717
>wouldn't passenger planes all use props to save money?
Airbus is currently developing a passenger plane that goes at jet speed with what are basically turboprop engines
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>>60940123
nice range
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>>60944655
No, for vertical lift, it's the other way around; one large rotor is more efficient than a bunch of little ones.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disc_loading
Note particularly the diagram near the bottom.

Now, that's not the entire picture; the Astro design above uses electrically-driven fans, which makes them much lighter and allows them to be placed in interesting layouts compared to 1-2 large, shaft-driven rotors. I don't think it's enough to offset the lift efficiency of a large rotor, however; note that the heaviest-lift helicopters ever built, like the Mi-26 and Skycrane, use a single massive rotor.



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