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What rechargeable bicycle lights does /n/ prefer? Tried searching Amazon, got the usual Bezos Bullshit (inexpensive bestsellers initially look promising, but "top reviews" mask common complaints, in this case batteries which stop charging and slipping/failing mounts). What would the discerning autist/snob in fluorescent spandex recommend? Do you really need to spend $100 or more for a quality front+rear set?
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>>1963336
OP samefagging to clarify: looking for a set for night riding, looking ahead for road debris/damage just as important as visibility to motorists.
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>>1963336
How long of a running time do you need? You might consider a brighter light because it comes with a bigger battery. What conditions? Completely unlit country roads (1000 lumen), suburban streetlights or park paths (400 lumen), well-lit city streets (100 lumen blinker)?

But yes, you'll spend more than $100 on a quality set so stop being poor/jewish. If you buy from a good brand they'll usually have a 2+ year warranty so if they shit the bed you'll get a new one for free. Good brands include any major bike brand like Spec/Bontrager
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>>1963336
I have a lupine set.
But front and rear did cost me 700€.
I atill think its worth it because i ride half a year in total darkness.
+ you can order each part of the light to repair it yourself.
>>
For the front:
Towild br800 can take any 18650 but has a blurry beam pattern
Enfitnix navi800 has a really good pattern but has a proprietary 18650
I've heard good things about the Fenix bc25r but I don't like it that you can't mount it upside down or on an out-front mount

For the rear Fenix BC05R V2.0 hands down
Do not get a "smart" or "auto brake sensing" rear light, useless garbage
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>>1963336
https://aliexpress.com/item/1005004351289790.html
I swear by those things, have them on every one of my bikes and gift them out on every occasion. The only inexpensive light I've seen with properly lensed optics, gives a good long focused rectangular light pattern that doesn't blind everyone around you. Also remarkably battery efficient for the brightness you get.
It's not perfect and does need tinkering though. You'd expect that for 15 bucks.
It does need an external battery, a cheap powerbank shell that takes 18650s taped to the frame will do, do some waterproofing on it plus carry a spare cell to swap if you're going far. Also get some way to charge the 18650s on their own if you don't yet.
It doesn't have strobe, but you can use it at low brightness to keep yourself visible, it lasts for a long time.
It's more of a high beam for going fast and relatively straight, the pattern is narrow, you might want a second light with a spread pattern to illuminate the ground immediately around you if you are doing trails (that also solves the issue of strobe). A cheapo regular bike light will do, you don't need much power since you'll angle it down.
You might blind cars if you place it high, it's best placed low on the bike with the light cone angled so the top of the pattern is nearly parallel to the ground. Included mounts are for placement on the bars, you'll need to make a bracket yourself to put it on the fork. You can cut it out of waste sheet metal (soda cans are too thin, but something thicker like deodorant can will do), or make a 3D printed bracket. Or don't bother, it's less blinding than the usual floodlights even when it points at you.

For the rear I use an old battery powered light. It's not bright but it's large and lasts forever on 2 AAs. Don't use strobe at night. If you are riding on the road, offset it to the left (or to the right if you live in wrong hand drive country) so cars think you are further on the road than you are, good safety margin.
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>>1963336
look at these brands.
>https://lightandmotion.com/
>https://cygolite.com/
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>>1963406
For regular sub 6 hour rides this seems excessive but for touring and bikepacking this has some potential.
I was thinking about making my own powerbank with the IP2368 board and charging it with a 65w gan charger during stops. Doing some short research it seems like it would be more time efficient than a dynamo+charger system.
Although I honestly would want to put more than 15 bucks into such a light.
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>>1963356
>>1963398
>>1963401
>>1963406
>>1963407
>>1963409
Thanks for the recs fellas, some helpful starting points. (I've been out of the gear game a loooong ass time.)
>>
-Dyno power, bicycles should be entirely self powered unless they’re actually electric motor-cycles.
-Cutoff beam pattern like every other vehicle on the road, not a round beam flashlight clamped to the handlebar.
-No blinking bullshit, it’s both rude and counterproductive.
>>
I struggled for a long time for finding a good light. I just ended up getting the Fenix BC21R to try out, there's a couple things that I liked about it:
-Fenix is good lights
-Replaceable cell (18650) which means another evening's ride is as easy as bringing one more battery, plus I already use other 18650 lights
-Reasonable low settings for winter and night urban riding
-Can be detached for safe storage or hand held use without the rubber straps (every one I've used eventually gets too loose or tears. This accelerates if you are riding at night often and can't easily charge on the bike or pulling the lights off when you have it locked up. The better mount and removeable battery solve both issues.

The only thing I don't like about it truly is the beam pattern. It would be better with a cut off beam for riding. I can angle it down but since it's circular head I may try to make something out of plastic that I can tape on for urban/suburb riding.

I really wish dynamos were more common in the US scene. For daily riding it's awesome and for touring/bike packing it would be such a boon to trickle charge nav and lights on the go.
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>>1963816
Thanks. I've had thoughts in the same direction, i.e. buy a light from a company specifically known for lights. The Fenix mount looks pretty beefy too. Re: beam pattern, and more generally, I might eventually give these guys a try, they look pretty serious:

https://www.outboundlighting.com/collections/bike-lights/products/detour

(Not cheap, but less than some other options mentioned.)
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>>1963826
I have a Fenix headlamp I've been extremely happy with and handhelds from them as well. If Streamlight made a bike light I'd probably try it out too. But yeah mount and replaceable battery cell (as well as option to run CR123s in a pinch) were big factors. I will try to remember to get some images for you of the light pattern in realistic conditions.

The Outbound I did look at. I may go back to them because they are the only one that I found that looks like it might be able to be a front fender light if I decide to go with a front rack set up. I can use the gopro mount and get something ahead of the handlebar bag or basket, which granted the Fenix can do too. Frankly based on the product description I'd rather they'd have kept the 'bulky' battery pack. Another 5g would probably get the low power battery mode over 12hrs and that's basically 2-3 days of low light riding without a charge.
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>>1963841
>I will try to remember to get some images for you of the light pattern in realistic conditions.
Massive legend. Thanks again, but desu at this point we'll probably just get some cheapest Amazon Chinese Specials to buy time while researching the better, more expensive options. For now we ain't travelin' too far after dark.

This was all so much simpler when I was a kid. At night you just smeared some radium on your top hat--and if a horse buggy got too close to your pennyfarthing, then you fired a warning shot with your flintlock. Simpler times.
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>>1963841
This is the BC21R in a phone's 'night mode' which is basically some artificial gain and increased exposure time. I felt this did a better job of capturing the beam pattern as your eye adjusted to darkness sees it. As you can see the center hot spot is very wide and there is a lot of spill. Looking at the quoted distance figures they are only accurate if the ambient light is low to non-existent but having the spill is very nice for awareness and peripheral, the faster you go the farther you want to see but overall low and med are sufficient for unlit areas at commute/cruising speeds. Can easily bump to high or turbo for downhills.
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>>1963948
This is medium with normal camera mode in what is common, if not darker than average suburban conditions. LED street lights with areas of shadow. This is on medium, 150 lumens. You can see that's its basically worthless for increasing visibility of the road surface so Low at 50 lumens is basically invisible.

This is a photonic barrier. The camera or your eye is adjusted to the brightest level of light which is in this case the ambient level. Because of this, the lower light from the flashlight is effectively still in shadow, so even though it's hitting things on the other side of the ambient light it's still dimmer than what your eyes are adjusted to.
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>>1963950
This is the same spot but on High, 400 Lumen mode. This is where it's actually increasing visibility of the road surface and not just the highly reflective stuff. My conclusion has been Med/150 lumens (and probably to around 200-250) you are going to be making yourself seen by cars and pedestrians, but in lit streets you won't be seeing any more than you would without it. At 300+ lumens you will actually start to pierce the ambient. I think is my least used mode, it's either dark enough that medium allows me to see or bright enough that I only need light to be safe, not navigate.
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>>1963952
This is 'Turbo' on the BC21R or 1200 lumens. I actually use this more than High mode because it's strong enough to see into things like cars and command peoples attention. I will tap this on for minute if I really need to assess what's in front of me. On social group rides we will often block a stop sign intersection in order to move the group quickly (imo safer and less impactful to traffic than a ton of bikes slowly trickling by). 1200 lumens is enough to get cars to acknowledge you no matter what the lighting conditions are. It's also enough illuminate larger areas fully, and frankly just when I'm walking back to where I racked up the bike it's kinda nice to to briefly light up the whole area when it's 2am and I've had a couple. In a perfect world I just have a dedicated handheld on me but it's nice that a light I have handy can provide that situational awareness.
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>>1963948
>>1963950
>>1963952
>>1963954

ORIGINAL CONTENT
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>>1963336
the cheapest one at decathlon
idk i dont like riding at night i schizo in the dark so i only keep them around for emergencies
i also have a head torch for seeing in the dark
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>>1964680
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>>1964693
Qrd on all these survival tips for a city slicker?
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>>1964707
Dunno, stole it from /out/, maybe check there for the lore.
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>>1964707
Also, for the urbanite, the most important tips are still:
>something something, never relax
>something something, you lose
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>>1964707
Most important thing outdoors is to never being to quiet. You dont know what you might see if you sneak around the woods.
And you certainly dont want to.
Remember, the wilderness is much much older than mankind.
>>
I use lezyne power pro 115+. It's really good, but battery life in freezing conditions is short, slice it in half.
Battery level indicator is imprecise too, so you have to learn how to use it.
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>>1963336
Are you looking for a strobing headlight?
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>>1963336
Knog, it's pretty much standard here. USB charging makes life so much easier and you really don't need more for commuting
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>>1967680
Too expensive for a light where you cant replace the battery imo.
Those small liions or lipos shit the bed in less than 2 years if you use them constantly
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>>1967680
>"pretty much standard"
>light called "The Blinder" without a proper cutoff pattern
And cyclists wonder why they're considered insufferable.
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>>1967681
I bought one as a backup "be seen" light for when I don't want to run a full beam. they're incredibly flimsy and you don't need to worry about the battery life cycles, that's not going to be why it fails

>>1967692
the name is ragefuel but it's actually a weak piece of shit. regardless, my main lights I will run at high angles and I will not apologize for it. it's the only way for drivers to notice me behind/beside them. if you're coming at me from a direction where that's a problem, you're breaking the law and it's not my problem
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>>1963356
Arbitrary gearfag nonsense. No seriously, I think you might actually have night blindness, 200 lumens is more than enough for "unlit country roads". 1000 would be like your own personal collapsed star.
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>>1967741
nta but the reason you need more light for urban night riding is that there's a lot more contrast between lighted and unlighted areas and the eyes can't adapt that fast. so while you're right that you need less for the middle of nowhere, it's not for the reasons you think
>>
Does anyone know if a mount that can fit a halogen car headlight bulb? Or is this a retarded idea?
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>>1967741
NTA but these days most people have no idea what 200 vs 1000 lumens is like because all the Amazon Chinese manufacturers claim ridiculous fake numbers, it's just an arms race of lies at this point.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6q_0wxzClkg
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>>1963409
>this seems excessive
No such thing. Lighting is safety, you're not going to pack up less light just because you ride for less time.
It works for ~4 hours off a single decent 18650 at 5 volts, so you realistically don't need more than a 2-cell bank with the most baisic board. It also seems to work at lower voltages just fine, so you might get away with using one of these charging boards with no step-up converter for extra efficiency, or just straight up leeching straight from a salvaged battery protection board that'll shut it off after getting to 3.7 volts and then charging the batts with an external charger. I'll test that with my next bike build, if this thread survives till march I'll update you on my shitty /gn/ misadventures.
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>>1964769
>is to never being to quiet
Please rewrite this after you finish 3rd grade english.
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>>1968665
Excessive as in you'd need to carry an external battery to power it, which automatically makes it last 10+ hours at max brightness if you power it with a 10 Ah bank and requires another bag or strap, unless you already ride with a large top tube bag.
Picrel. I'm that autismo. These lights do indeed seem to have a li-ion regulator with a shutoff at around 3.2 volts, regardless if the other end is USB or a cylinder dc plug. So I just bypassed my powerbanks' boost converter to avoid unecessarry losses from double conversion.
It worked, but then I got a towild br800 and enfitnix navi800 and don't use anything else anymore. On multi-day trips I just charge them while riding.
Also, having lights that are too bright can have the opposite effect unless their beam is really really honed in. The light can make your pupils shrink and make you not see what you otherwise would in the dark.
>>
I really like my niterider lumina. I run it at the lowest setting and it seems they keep the same mount so I can have different years/types and they fit on the same mount fine.
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>>1963336
have blinking lights
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ue0nAsx_3E
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>>1963556
blinking bullshit is good when used right
i only use mine when its light enough that people can see me and my bike not just my light
i cycle and drive so i get it
people using the blinking mode in the dark with that being their only light are genuinely retarded
during bright daylight i dont use my lights
its around noon dusk or if its a really cloudy gloomy day or raining they really help
a constant light doesnt stand out in daylight especially if its wet and theres reflections everywhere
the flashing mode still catches attention though
if not for that i need to do even gayer shit like high vis clothing
so the flashing mode for me is for that specific time where its actually helping visibility and not hindering it
flashing saves alooooot of battery too
i need to save the solid mode for when its dark
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>>1963336
im looking for the cheapest light i can get that has a high low beam thing like a car or motorcycle
something i can control easily from the handlebar
is this even a thing?
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>>1971193
dawn dusk*
only noon if the weather is actually that bad
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>>1968380
there used to be a hobo I'd see riding around NYC with car headlights nailed to a wooden beam tied to his bars, which was wired to batteries
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>>1963336
What do you call a led light that runs when you pedal? Is it worth the effort to get one with a battery?
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>>1967681
>>1967692
Ok, so you guys don't cycle and are not from a country where people commute to work by bike daily. Why do you guys even have an opinion then?
Again, half the country here uses Knogs, because they are so simple and you can charge them everywhere.
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>>1975778
ok knogger
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>>1975761
dynamo
dynamo is not worth it unless you're travelling with a tent and don't have any way of charging batteries
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>>1975761
Dynamo, hub-generator, idk.
>Is it worth the effort to get one with a battery?
With batteries you can get much brighter light. Dynamos kinda suck, as their power output is limited. But in the past they used to work with tiny incandescent (2W max), and today with LEDs you can get quite a lot of light with 2W (400 lm with high quality LEDs, 300 lm with average LEDs).
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>>1976593
I travel with a tent and I think that dynamos are useless. Still think they are more reliable for urban and commuting though.
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>>1975778
>they don't use flimsy trash lights so they must not ride bikes
let's see your walkscore >>1977050
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>>1977052
Are you using some kind of usb charging converter? If so, which one?
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>>1963336
>this case batteries which stop charging and slipping/failing mounts). What would the discerning autist/snob in fluorescent spandex recommend?

Fellow autist lycra but non snob here. Roadie 2500 mi/yr. I disagree with the "buy high quality BIFL" with bike lights. I'd rather have 5 $20 bezos specials that I can swap out anytime you want as their max battery on full fucking crazy blink (what you obvs want) is 4-6 hours.

In my experience it isn't the mounts that fail- almost every model I've seen is universal you just need to find one that fit your seatpost which shouldn't be a problem.

There are two different types of mounts- mounts with a stretchy durable rubber band approx 1cm wide with holds that looks like a belt and ones with a cirle male attachement you put on the post and slide the female end of the attachment on the little rails. They both secure fine. The catch is with the rubber bandy ones you can use them with the newest D shaped seatposts.

If you are indeed looking for best of the best and/or chic I'd say just buy the Garmin Varia. It works great- seen it in action. And you get a working radar system that goes with your headunit.

If you are a non headunit guy and want name brand quality my brand-loyal friends swear by the BONTRAGER FLARE.

>Do you really need to spend $100 or more for a quality front+rear set?

I'd say you'd want to spend about 30 to 50 dollars for each light. The bontrager flair rear light is 58 usd. the fancy garmin varia radar rear light is 185 usd.

I only ride at dusk not at night so I bought a fuckbright bezos special that works great at $35 and a teeny tiny $12 bell one literally bought at walmart on the front as I generally don't ride in the dark only the dusk and don't need anything too rad.
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>>1977058
Why are you only using a taillight? Headlights are important too and a good one costs approximately 2x what a good taillight costs because the power requirements are higher.
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>>1977056
not the guy but on long bike commutes you buy those little portable chargers that look like a candy bar and have a couple usb ports on them.

I bought 5 of them at wmt made by ONN. They were $6 each and will charge my telephone at the rate of 1% per minute.
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>>1977061
>Why are you only using a taillight? Headlights are important too and a good one costs approximately 2x what a good taillight costs because the power requirements are higher.

>I only ride at dusk not at night so I bought a fuckbright bezos special that works great at $35 and a teeny tiny $12 bell one literally bought at walmart on the front as I generally don't ride in the dark only the dusk and don't need anything too rad.

I have a front headlight. It has the ability to act as a headlight and I'll use it sometimes but in general I use the blinking feature once it is dusk.

Another good thing to do is have cacophonous blinking on the rear. If you ride on insane roads buy 3 bezos specials and put one on your seatpost, and 2 on the seatstays and set them all to blink not at the same time. They'll see ya.
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>>1977063
Probably not a very bright one though? Can you illuminate a dark road surface so it's consistently visible to your eyes even after they've been blinded by car headlights or street lamps? Being visible to cars is important too but it's insufficient for fast riding at night
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>>1977055
fatty detected. why is it always the merifarts' you guys are completely irrelevant to cycling and it shows. half of Europe bikes have knogs on them for a reason.
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>>1977085
>walking and biking everywhere is for fat people
>having bike gear that isn't trash is for people who don't bike
how many levels of cope is this lol
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>>1977070
to answer your specific question, yes it is sufficient for that. I'm also a suburban lycra roadie so my tarmac is also usually illuminated by streetlights (you still need a light but I'm not cutting a beam through virgin dark sky here.
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>>1977062
>anon discovers power banks
...congrats?
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>>1977085
>half of Europe bikes have knogs on them for a reason.
jesus christ how horrible
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>>1963556
>bicycles should be entirely self powered unless they’re actually electric motor-cycles.
why
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>>1963336
I really recommend the Sofirn BS01
>cut beam so doesn't blind people
>USB C rechargeable
>can be used as a power bank
>serviceable standard 21700 battery (behind screws)
>quick mount/unmount
>metal body
>can even be used as a regular light in your hand (weird beam in that case but OK)
>still quite cheap
It's got some useless "smart mode" that I don't use too



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