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previous >>1935272

post pictures plans dreams setups questions trips
>>
>>1979094
i've had a plan for 10+ years to do a long tour, but i just don't know if it's really feasible. how do i get the money? i'd have to quit my job, too. but i want to follow my dreams. for all intents and purposes, my life hasn't changed that much since the original idea hatched in my brain. i don't have any greater commitments that are preventing me from doing it, like a wife, kids, etc. i don't want to keep waiting until i have some excuse to never do it. thanks for reading my blog.
>>
>>1979135
You should start doing some smaller 3-4 day long tours instead of hyping yourself up to the "Big one" forever.
Also there are cheap ways of doing a bike tour; camping or bivy on tour, used bikes etc.
>>
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>>1979135
>but i want to follow my dreams
don't. you'll just end up disappointed
>>
>>1979135
so much this. need to get out there for weekend tours this year
>>
>>1979142
yeah, i think about this a lot. i do tend to want to do "all or nothing" in a lot of aspects of life, and it unfortunately often results in the "nothing".
>>
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Going for a one month tour in europe, initial plan is to go from Estonia to Switzerland and back through Germany, though I don't really care as long as I get to ride and see new places. Will probably include swiping a lot of credit card since on previous tours I've always slept awful outside. Any tips welcome regarding that. I've plans to practice more of it during the spring as I'd like to keep the costs down. This will be by my longest trip, I've only done one week long so far.

>>1979192
kind of in the same boat but I've noticed that the more I've done smaller tours there more I am ready to sacrifice in terms of vacation to bigger ones. The experience is vital too.
>>
>>1979204
>kind of in the same boat but I've noticed that the more I've done smaller tours there more I am ready to sacrifice in terms of vacation to bigger ones. The experience is vital too.
Yeah for sure. Especially with your body and equipment. I wouldn't want to travel somewhere far away to do a months-long tour and 3 days in realize that my saddle makes my dick numb and my handlebars hurt my wrists.
>>
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Ideas how to carry a cool drink in the summer heat? I only need it to last 2-3 hours, from the last shop to the campsite so I can have a refreshing cold beverage in the evening.
Currently considering:
>a single-wall steel bottle filled with ice cubes, I don't know if it will hold the temp long enough
>a vacuum flask, but those are heavy and low volume
>a can of shandy with a bag of ice cubes, wrapped in a drybag in the pannier

I hate lwarm plastic tasting water so much bros.
>>
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>>1979204
>em.png
>>
>>1979241
thermos

NEXT QUESTION
>>
I'm heading out of town for a 3 day tour now
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>>1979250
What is that bottle cage on the seat tube?
I use a similar kind of bottle, Camelbak Chute, but the tab at the top of most bottle cages doesn't work w/ it. Usually I'll get plastic ones & cut that tab off, but the plastic always breaks after a year or so & I'd like a metal one.
>>
>>1979242
good one
>>
>>1979250
cool.
those wheels are built like a brick shithouse , nice
>>
>>1979135
>>1979094
how feasible is bike touring/ bike packing even pedestrian backpacking really? I've always tallied up the costs and came to the conclussion that driving would be way cheaper since you get to move faster, you will eat less and lodge less so your costs will be lower, and you can sleep in it better than in a tent or sleeping bag.

I've always liked the idea of doing some tour of europe on a bike, but I realise it's more romantic than practical (in terms of costs). maybe I'm wrong who knows, but unfortunately the car can carry more camping gear than a single bike can
>>
>>1979142
this is the best advice
>>
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>>1979364
the idea is that you get to ride a bike all day. In my opinion completely different to car road trips. Plus it's pretty nice to just eat like a king all day.

>>1979242
lmao was actually just thinking about if I should get that bag or just go with a Wald or a carradice bag
>>
An endless straight of the Danube river cycle path between Vienna and the Slovakian border. Taken by myself in 2023, when I completed the last stages of my big three-year project of riding the Danube cycle path from its source in Donaueschingen, Germany, to the Slovakian border.
>>
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>>1979439
fuck, forgot to attach the picture
>>
>>1979364
Yeah, to me touring is all about the experience, not a form of transportation. I prefer to camp while touring, so that's free or very cheap.
>>
>>1979364
>I realise it's more romantic than practical (in terms of costs). maybe I'm wrong who knows, but unfortunately the car can carry more camping gear than a single bike can
In Germany at least camping is expensive as fuck, pretty much two thirds the price of a cheap room in some inn or some bed&breakfast. Plus like five Euro flatrate if you want electricity.

Traveling by bike with minimal luggage and staying in a proper room at night are a very sound concept.
>>
>>1979439
>>1979440
very cool
>>
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>>1979444
I have tons and tons of pics, I usually take thousands of them on a multi day tour. This is Castle Werenwag in Baden-Württemberg, about 15km west of Sigmaringen, also shot while riding the Danube cycle path
>>
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>>1979444
right in the center of the pic you can barely make out the silhouette of a building on a hill....
>>
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>>1979444
it is the famous Benedictine abbey of Melk. Sean Connery's young acolyte sidekick Adson in "The Name of the Rose" was from here.
>>
>>1979453
Nice. Did you camp on this trip, or stay in lodging?
>>
>>1979459
I stayed in lodging exclusively. I did the trip on my electric unicycle, there is almost no room for stuff, much less than on a bicycle. Just a backpack with my EUC charger, a second T-shirt and a second pair of socks, a toothbrush and paste. I thought I was crazy for packing a USB powered fan too, but it frigging saved me when I slept at night. The temperatures were 35°C throughout the whole trip and the rooms were suffocating at night
>>
>>1979464
>there is almost no room for stuff
Ahh yeah that makes sense. I'm also really interested in all the camping laws in different countries. I could be wrong, but I thought I've heard that you're allowed to camp almost anywhere in Mongolia. It's got such a low population density so there's so little privately owned land outside of cities. And then open access land in the UK where you can go on private property, but you usually can't camp on it.
>>
>>1979495
In Germany at least camping outside of dedicated camping grounds is forbidden everywhere, unless you have the explicit permission of the property owner.
>>
>>1979534
Yeah, I grew up in the eastern US and that's pretty much what it's like. But the western part of the US has so much government-owned land and you can camp pretty much wherever you want on a lot of it. It's really cool, but obviously it's more sparsely populated.
>>
>>1979431
>Plus it's pretty nice to just eat like a king all day.
this
>>
route was like half gravel with ridiculous gravel climbs, 16% for 2km kind of thing.

I'd forgotten the feeling. You're trapped in your lowest gear (26x36), exhausted, can't stand up to stretch or the back wheel will slip, can't weave around or the front wheel will slide out, so you're constantly on the verge of losing control, zoning out, snapping back.

bike would handle better uphill with lowrider panniers but they're a huge aero penalty and i didn't need that much stuff for a few days in summer.
>>
>>
>>
my campsite
this was up the hill behind a locked gate on the side of a random service road
there was an actual campground closeish by but it had lots of flies around the long drop and no good view and so i explored a bit and found this spot instead.

cut some fern branches for a seat
had some korean noodles, bread, and goats cheese
drank some whiskey
read my book outside with a head torch
smoked a j

nice night
>>
>>1979571
>palm trees
>looks like the Smokey mountains
South Carolina?
>>
>>1979268
I know what you mean yeah.
That one does still have the tab but it works ok getting smashed around on gravel because it's really squished in there and the tab is minor. It's XLC.
I think you could probably bend a lot of those tabs back with a vice.
The pdw owl cage (i didn't buy this, got a box of random stock from a closed down lbs) doesn't have the tab but you don't want to run it on the seat tube because it can snag pants when it's empty.

>>1979241
mountain spring + sawyer filter
>>
>>1979576
Hunua Ranges in NZ
>>
>>1979581
had no idea y'all got palm trees down there. cheers.
>>
>>1979582
that's a fern
we do have palm trees also (nikau palm)
>>
shout out to these things
>>
>>1979584
there's a palm in this pic is what I meant
>>1979569
>>
>>1979586
it's a fern not a palm
>>
>>1979587
never saw a fern with a tree trunk before
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>>1979591
yeah that's a fern for sure. Pretty common. People use those trunks as garden edging.
there are a few different kinds of huge ferns here, they can be 20-30 metres tall
most of our native plants and animals are found nowhere else
>>
nice, thank you for sharing kiwi dude. your bike is perfectly specd, definitely would tour on that but that granny 26 it's a nono for my legs on hills. I personally don't like the tunnel tent though, isn't it a bit hot and stuffy?how did you sleep? as i see from the weather you shouldn't drop below 15 at nights at this time of the year. what kind of flies do you have down there that warrant a pyro spiral thingy? here in europe the main nuisance in swampy places, and in the hottest months, are mosquitos, but i just spray myself with what I am sure are carcinogenic endocrine disruptors and foggehdaboutit, and use an inner tent with large mosquito net openings.
>>
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Cycled from Portugal to Sweden via Corsica and Sardinia over 5 months, 7200km, 124 days.

I used to post here, thanks to those who gave their support :)
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>>1979711
nice... how hard for the heart are those ferries in the mediteranean? you have to leave the bike away from you? rude sailors will touch her all over? what about baggage and stuff. serious question
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>>1979712

Easy as fuck.

Ferry from Nice to Corsica was a joy. Super nice ferry, cheap, cost like 50 euro with bike, around that amount. You can get a cabin or else you share a big empty conference room with other cheapskates. I had my camping stuff with me so it was actually great getting my inflatable mattress out and getting some sleep.

Sardinia to Civitivecchia. Was ok. I got scammed cos I bought my ticket via a 3rd party website that didnt include my bike when they said they would. But again relatively cheap. Not as nice crossing, but it did the job.

Sailors / engineers were nice. I was impressed with their knot tying skills. Just remember to take what you need with you, the car hold is locked during the voyage.
>>
>>1979717
ok. since i read things about workers (mis)handling bikes and not being able to access it during the voyage I have been scared of using a ferry, especially in high season with a lot of people. but nice to know you had a pleasant experience particularly on those long stretches.
guess if i ever want to get to sardinia or corsica i would have to overcome this fear
>>
>>1979718
It's really not an issue. You handle and secure your bike yourself and to be extra safe, just use a cable to secure all your panniers. Take all valuables with you.

It's almost guaranteed you won't be the only one with a bike.
>>
>>1979585
I thought about bringing those innawoods but I feel like they would take a while to get going and not be 100% effective. Also there's a small but non-zero chance to start a forest fire if you're careless.
>>
>>1979711
legendary
>>
>>1979634
thanks man
I love that tent, good memories on bike tours. It's awesome in a storm. Macpac have repaired it for free a couple times. It is hot, but nights are rarely oppressively hot here. I've got a nemo one as well that's cooler but it's more for 2 people or car camping.

The spirally thingy is for mozzies and sandflies.

>>1979733
>there's a small but non-zero chance to start a forest fire if you're careless.
True. I wouldn't use em in arid place, if sparks on the ground could start a fire.
>I feel like they would take a while to get going and not be 100% effective
They get going instantly and yes, they're not 100% effective but one of them makes a significant difference. Alongside DEET spray. Well worth the gramz
>>
>>1979711
amazing.

>>1979717
ferry + bike is the best.

>>1979718
Strap the front wheel to the downtube so it can't fall over
>>
>>1979711
That's awesome. The hardest thing for me to fathom to do such a long tour is money and my job. I'd have to save up for a while, but then I think I'd have to quit my job. I couldn't just leave for like 6 months and then expect them to take me back. Can I ask what your situation was?
>>
>>1979903
dude just go on some weekend trips
>>
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>>1979903
Cheers, yeah it's a unique position you must be in to do this.

I can explain mine:
>tl:dr: I was in between jobs, I had money and I could do it.

Full story:
So I spent the better part of my 20s studying, working, moving countries. In my early 30s I started to feel burnt out, but it wasn't until my mid 30s that I was completely fucked with work. I was depressed and just dreamed to finally do something about it.

I already did some tours, and had a bike, but I needed to upgrade. A friend built me some crazy strong wheels with a dynamo to let me charge my shit.
I spent countless hours at work building and prepping my tour, I spent weeks on Komoot planning my route.

I am a bit autistic so I listed every detail during the route. Distance, checkpoints, potential campsites/hotels, down to the probability of temperature/weather, and wind direction.

When I quit, I told people what I was going to do, everyone lost their shit. "wHaTaBouT yOuR cArEer, etc etc", they would say. I shrugged. I had a feeling that it wouldn't be hard to find a job again.

I started almost a year ago, and it was both terrifying and one of the best things I've ever done. I met so many cool people, some shit people, but above all, everyday was different. Towards the 100th day, I was starting to get sick of sleeping out of my tent and wearing sweaty clothes. So I was looking forward to getting home and sleeping my own bed. During my tour I did interviews and I had a job lined up after the tour.

One of the hardest things was keeping things good with my gf. She came to visit me 3 times, and it was a huge moral boost and made city stops that much nicer.

In the future I would do short weekend/weekday trips. Train + bike = good bike tour.
>>
>>1979954
Nice story, happy for you. good for you with a job and gf. I personally chose the other road, took the hobo pill, prefer my tent and mattress to my home, and perfected routines to wash myself and my clothes on the road. Also probably better your way to shake up your life than just getting hooked on pills like many do.
>>
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I'm working on reducing the weight of my fair weather camping gear. I have a light fly with bug net in the works and am looking at making a light weight sleeping bag; this should drop at least a dozen pounds and a lot of volume from my current setup. My current bike and gear combo is nearly 100 lbs, it would be nice to be able to bring lighter gear on a lighter bike.

>>1979250
>>1979568
Love to see that Gunnar again. I hope to take mine on some 3 day camping trips this summer.

>>1979954
Amazing tour anon! This is what life is all about. Supporting yourself while figuring out how not to turn into a husk-person.
>>
>>1979954
Nice, that's awesome. It's interesting to hear how different people experience their lifestyles. I've reached out to a few people on instagram who seems to be traveling by bike all the time to ask how they do it. One of them is a photographer, so he makes money with that and by writing bike-related articles. Another guy said he taught English abroad for a bit, saved money, moved back home and bought a property. He now rents that out and makes enough money from that to just keep traveling on his bike.
>>
i like the concept of bike touring. how much does it cost to get all the gear for it? im a poorfag (which is kinda why im into cycling in the first place; it's a inexpensive hobby if you buy a $100 used bike), so i dont know if i can afford it. all the saddle bags, etc. would prob cost more than my bike lel.
>>
>>1980357
Don't want to sound pretentious but it's not a thing you buy It's a thing you do. It may cost as little as strapping a backpack on your rear rack and go. A full set of bags on a random bike still may cost no more than 150. It gets tricky when you start searching for a safe and sound bike and durable setups, but it's still a really affordable hobby I can assure you.
For a start, just know where you would like to go and what you would like to bring with you, and find the better way for you to do it, I've seen people with the most improvised rigs go very far.
>>
>>1980357

it's possible to use non cycling specific suitcases or rucksacks if you're good with belts and bungee cords
>>
>>1980357
I'm a huge over-planner and I always want to make sure everything is exactly how I want it before I pull the trigger. But I have a lot of admiration for people who just do it and make it work as best they can.
You'll have a lot more fun if you load up your backpack, hop on your bike, and do a weekend trip than if you obsess over what gear to get and plan it all out until you realize you have to wait until next summer to afford it.
>>
I'll be in Germany during the Spring/Early summer my plan is to ride a part of the Rhine
Should I do
>Middle Rhine
>Train to Hamburg
>Cycle Hamburg to Berlin
or
>Cycle middle rhine onwards to Netherlands
I only have about a week and I ideally would want to take in some of the places I'll be visiting
>>
>>1980357
I would just recommend campsites which are like £20, a tent from decathlon for maybe £100, a pannier for £50 and you're pretty much set.
Obviously you need some spare supplies and stuff but it doesn't have to be anything outrageous.
Depending on how bad you are socially you can use warmshowers to find people who are willing to let you crash at their house for free
>>
>>1980388
Onestly neither but the idea of making the most scenic part of the rhein, then catching a train to hamburg for a quick heroin fix, a couple of days of total nothing flatland and cow pastures, then to berlin for a quick gay sex doesn't seem bad at all.
>>
>>1980397
o.O
>>
>>1980357
I have a feeling you could score a nearly complete set of camping gear for free or a symbolic beer if you joined your local bushcraft forum or facebook group and just asked. People tend to upgrade their kit over time and nobody wants to buy used low end shit so it's just left lying around. I know I have tons of stuff I don't use anymore but can't be assed to sell.
>>
>>1980357
consider that bicycle touring predates the very existence of decent gear
>>
>>1979711
Why didn't you go along the northern coast in spain? Too hilly?
Did you wild camp at all? Planning a similar trip to your portugal-spain-france portion, but going south
>>
>>1980543
The official Eurovelo route through Spain takes you along the Camino de Santiago. The very North is possible, but extremely hilly.

Yes, depending on country: Portugal, Spain, France, Denmark, Sweden, yes. The rest no, I used Warm Showers or cheap hotels/campsites.

The Spain route I did is ok, Pamplona to Longrono is ok, but there are sections that are like pure desert, and you will have wind in your face from Burgos to Leon. Galicia was a bitch as well, after Santiago.

Portugal is ok, but the roads are dogshit, and depending on time of year, could be packed full of retarded drivers.
>>
from the thumb it looks like the paniers are all pepes
>>
I built a bike, collected all the kite but I'm a bit apprehensive to go on my first trip. I'd love to go with someone who has some experience but don't know anybody.

How to overcome beginners nerves?
>>
>>1980582
Totally normal. I have a full on panic attack before I start. Just get on your bike and go, make sure you're prepped. Don't push yourself too hard.
>>
not normal at all guys. no judgement but this is just you.
>>
>>1980582
Which part are you scared of?
>>
>>1980589
uh huh?
>>
>>1979711
>>1979717
>>1979954
Amazing trip and awesome to hear you finished it safe and sound. I actually remember you from from the original thread and gave you some tips on Portugal. Cheers man.
>>
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>>1979534
>In Germany at least camping outside of dedicated camping grounds is forbidden everywhere

1. Nobody cares.
2. It's also factually wrong. In the states of Brandenburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Schleswig-Holstein, camping inna woods is allowed for a single night provided you're not travelling in a motorized vehicle.
>>
>>1979135
What's the longest tour you've done?

>>1979364
Depends a LOT on your terrain and route, no?

Idea: Drive to different places and have one day bike rides.
>>
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>>1980662
Cheers brother. Also thanks for remembering, and perhaps giving support.

>>1980722
I was tempted to wild camp in Germany, but I was afraid of getting ass raped by some trigger happy rule-following fascist.

German campsites are a thing to behold. I was at one where they charged you per 15 sec of shower usage.

Then again, Germans excel at shower efficiency.
>>
>>1979204
>16 spoke wheel
why
>>
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>>1980866
It's just fashion. 13c aero wheels don't really make any sense with cx tires anyway. Pretty Instagram setup though, I'm trying to make something more performance oriented for next summer too.
>>
>>1980724
>What's the longest tour you've done?
like a week. i haven't been able to take off work for more time than that.
>>
>>1980866
One of my mom's bike is like that and it's super fast
>>
>>1980832
>German campsites are a thing to behold. I was at one where they charged you per 15 sec of shower usage.
?
The campsite charges extra if you use the bathroom?
>>
>>1980866
those classic campy shamal etc wheels are glorious to ride on.
they're heavy but spin up super fast and kind of hum at speed. feels really cool
>>
>>1980972
you've never used a coin shower before?
normally it's per minute or per 2 minutes
>>
why are bikes so expensive all of the sudden? I remember my dad buying me a decent mtb like 10 years ago for under 100$, now an equivalent one would cost 3-400, if not more.
I was looking to buy a very simple one with close to no gears and mechanical shit that could brake down, and even the most bare-bone bike I found in my area is at least 200$ new
>>
>>1980993
the jamis question
>>
>>1980993
Covid was the original excuse, and have you ever heard of a company lowering its prices after they were raised due to an "emergency"?
>>
>>1979250
>Parked in disabled bay
>Taking up room for 4 people

And you cyclist fucks have the gall to criticize car drivers
>>
>>1979204
For sleeping outside, what is your current system? What are your complaints about it (temp, comfort, sleep position)? I am light in the touring history but heavy in the camping one.

>>1979241
Vacuum flask is the longest lasting option but is the most efficient. I would say go bigger since minimal additional material is needed to increase volume. As a comparison, a 20oz hyrdoflask is listed at .41kg but the 64oz is .9kg. Less than double the weight for triple the volume. The other option I can think of is a material called 'reflectix' or similar. It's basically just aluminized bubble wrap with a very high R value. I use it to insulate tons of stuff camping. It's cheap and you can make a cozy for any existing light bottle, however it will noticeably increase the bulk even though it's extremely light. It would be good if you had a big cage or rack you were strapping a container too, won't work with traditional bottle cages.

Have my first big tours planned here. I am going to do an US east coast classic on the GAP/C&O this year. I am also going to plan a multi-modal train/bike/ferry trip north to family in New England over a couple of days. Really looking forward to it. Burn out by work and need several long disconnects this year.
>>
>>1980993
>a decent mtb like 10 years ago for under 100$
no
>>
>>1979954

I'm from Corsica, too bad I disdn't hear about your trip in time, I could have shown you some truly impressive places
>>
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>>1981175
Cool! I did the GT20, but starting at Bastia.

Out of all of the countries, Corsica was the top of the list.

It's a pain in the ass to get to and from the Island, but everything it offers is worth it.
>>
>>1979142
>want to do this
>remember I'm in murrica
>give up
>>
What's a good bike lock to use when going into stores? I'm not talking about deterring dedicated bike thieves for prolonged periods of time, just something that can't be cut in one go with a pair of hand pliers.
I'm using a folding lock like this, wondering if there's anything lighter that can be trusted.
>>
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>>1981300
>wondering if there's anything lighter that can be trusted.
Not really. The peace of mind is worth the weight though in my opinion.
Pic related, the Kryptonite Evolution Mini 5 is probably the best safety-weight compromise, provided your tires are theft-protected with pitlocks or something. That way a mini u-lock is flexible enough. I'm using an Abus Granit X-Plus Mini right now. It's a bit heavier than the Kryptonite at 1200g but beefier and has the better keys and cylinder. The Kryptonite seems to have a lot of quality control issues with the keys.
>>
I have a granit x plus too. 1,5 kg and peace of mind. at least I am going to find my frame.
>>1981300
your question is giving me a headache.
A)you know an opportunist nigger with hand pliers is going to "steal" your bags anyway? this really is the last thing you should think about when touring.
b) you can't have something lighter and still trustworthy. you either get something trustworthy and peace of mind or something light
>>
>>1981352
>A)you know an opportunist nigger with hand pliers is going to "steal" your bags anyway?
Highly unlikely. The fuck is he gonna do with my clothes, tools and sleeping bag? Bike touring gear is tough to make money off. The panniers themselves are probably the most resellable items.
I've never had anything stolen off of my bicycle in over ten years of bicycle touring except for a bag of chips in Tunisia. There has been at least one attempt to steal my bicycle though.
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>>1981300

I had a massive ABUS Granit on my tourer, it's like 1.5 kg, or more. With that I had a steel cable that I could immobilise my bike with.

In reality I needed it like 20% of the time. I always locked up my bike at night, if my bike was rolled off then I was completely screwed. But there were times I had to lock my bike up in a town for short periods of time, the key is to attach it to something, otherwise someone could just pick it up.

Also having a pannier stolen would suck dick.

Check your surroundings and if it feels bad, leave.
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>>1981358
>hmmm... akchually it's highly unlikely...
it was an hypothethical proposition. if you assume than in an imagined situation an opportunistic thief will try to snatch your bike, you have to assume he will try to snatch your stuff. that's just logic.
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>>1981370
>if you assume than in an imagined situation an opportunistic thief will try to snatch your bike
Nah, because the stuff inside the panniers is largely worthless to a thief, opposed to the bike itself.
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>>1981375
these discussions on hypothetical thefts are always stupid and the stupidest take is the one you have, to assume you know perfectly all the variables. everyone copes as he wish with the unknown but your cope of a thief as a rational economic agent is the most plebeian.
I repeat, in an hypothetical situation in which an hypothetical opportunistic thief will try to steal everything that isn't locked with kryptonite, he will start from your bag. that's just logic.
Just because your experience (and mine too) says that no one touches your stuff it doesn't mean that it is "highly unlikely" in every corner of the world in every moment.
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>>1981370
>>1981381
It's A hypothetical you ESL pseud.
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>>1981384
it'a transportation board you monolingual nerd, not your discord server. do you have anything interesting to say on bikes? get back on the faggy half of the board or wherever you come from
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>>1981386
Your input is worthless, feel free to fuck off wherever YOU came from.
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>>1981391
>Your input is worthless... because I said so!
Why are you so butthurt, what's going on mate? What did I say that made you so mad my friend?
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>>1981300
install a guard dog on your bike
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>>1981428
Your input is worthless because the only thing backing it up is "because I said so", and you trying to speak from the position of authority as if your opinions are more worthwhile than the other guy's is hilarious. Enroll into some self awareness class, clown.
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>>1981558
>>1981428
>>1981391
>>1981386
>>1981384
>>1981381
>>1981370
>>1981375

Will you fags chill out? This is a cycling thread.

Good vibes only.
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>>1981571
He started it!
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>>1979431
where is pic rel from? looks super cozy
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Newbie here. What's the difference between touring and bikepacking anyway?

I'm planning to travel between islands in my country for around 1400km (including ferry travel). Is there a route planner app to set checkpoints/stops, etc?
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>>1982445
>Newbie here. What's the difference between touring and bikepacking anyway?
Nothing. The cycling industry just likes to pretend it's invented stuff again so that consumers can feel like pioneers.

There's kind of a distinction with the gear.
A traditional touring setup uses racks, panniers and 30-40mm tires.
Typically a bikepacking setup uses bags that strap directly on the bike, and 50-60mm tires.

Bikepacking gear is lighter, more aerodynamic, more secure, and the bike should be more capable offroad.
On the other hand you have way less gear capacity and packing it is more annoying.
So bikepacking is more suited to doing serious efforts and going fast, and touring is more suited to long term travel.

There are a number more things you might roughly throw into either category but in reality the crossover is enormous and most people's setups and days riding crossover between the two.
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>>1982445
>What's the difference between touring and bikepacking anyway?

Nothing that a google won't fix, but I'm procrastinating and I can answer with own opinion:

>Touring
Main difference I see is that tourers have multiple panniers front and back, filled with everything they need for a multi-month journey. Touring bikes look pretty dorky, but they are the classic way of exploring a country mainly using roads. Touring bikes are traditionally steel-frame, with multiple gearing configurations. Huge variety of bikes to choose from these days, but classic luggage setup: 20L x2 panniers on back, 7.5L x2 front, handlebar bag, maybe large dry bag on rack. Doesn't have to be lightweight.

>Bikepacking
Relatively newer style of bike exploration. More angle towards off-trail exploration using gravel-bikes or mountain bikes, even fat-bikes. Much more optimised baggage system, very little if any panniers, but instead frame/saddle/handlebar bags, reducing carrying capacity. Gear is optimised as well, e.g.: lightweight tent, and it's more about endurance than being a tourist. Totally fine, but can be limiting.

Which islands can I ask?
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>>1982448
Thanks. I guess I'll be touring. Idk how many days it'll take and I have no idea if I can do it and not give up.

>>1982449
Philippines. Going from Southern Island of Mindanao to the islands of Visayas and then ending in the island of Luzon. I'm planning a route to visit friends and family. Tbh I'm scared as hell since the farthest I've gone is 50km. I've been trying to "train" climbing but I haven't tried doing it without carrying any gear except my wallet and a water bottle.
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>>1982450
That sounds awesome.

I'd go for a light set up cos you'll be going in and out of ferrys, up hills so I'd imagine. I dont know what the wild camping situation is like, but if there is cheap accomodation, I'd almost ditch the tent.

Use wet lube, that salty air won't do your chain any favours.

>tfw eating roast pork daily and cycling
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>>1982445
bike packing is more analogous to backpacking. the gear is more modern and made to handle offroad.
you could bikepack with traditional touring bags but they're not purpose built for it. you could buy bikepacking gear and never leave the road if you prefer those style of bags.
both versions you usually camp out but if you're not broke you can skip carrying the camping gear and "credit card tour", stay in hotels every night. that would definitely be a tour, even if you used bikepacking bags for your clothes
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How is tubeless for touring? The main points that worry me:
If I have a big enough puncture that I need to use a repair kit, can the tire be re-inflated with a hand pump or do I need a compressor?
If repair fails, how messy is getting a tube inside a tire with sealant?
How hard is it to take off a sealed tire, mine already barely come off.
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>>1982491
Depends on the length. I'd avoid tubeless for any long tour, the hassle is simply not worth it. Also, you're not gonna carry a box of sealant with you ...
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what poorfag rear rack is gud?
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This is my ride, I've gone cross country on a trike before but with this trike I've put solid tires on it and I've ordered a set to put on my trailer as well, as fir the trailer it's a gorilla cart tub and frame welded to the chassis of my old trike, im also gonna epoxy up a topper for the trailer and stick a solar panel on it
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>>1982677
I forgot to mention my trike has a sa 5 speed gear hub and I have a sigma bc 14.0 computer I need to figure out how to install
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>>1982491
If just using bacon strips, not really a huge deal for a repair. You shouldn't need a compressor to re-inflate the tire. Sealant can be added by removing the valve core and using a syringe or a squeeze bottle with a small tip.
Actual problems would be if you have a tire issue that requires removing the tire from the bead, and that usually requires a floor pump at least. And if the tour is very long or damage severe, you should probably bring at least a refill of your sealant as you shouldn't mix types. Granted if you stop a shop you can figure something out.
If you are not currently using a tubeless set up, I probably wouldn't bother with doing so unless you expect some kind of area with a significant amount of flat potential that you want to avoid stopping for. Or possibly if you are heavily loaded and are trying to run lower pressure for comfort. Otherwise on pavement or light gravel a couple of tubes and a stack of patches will keep you rolling just fine. Tubeless can work but like all things make sure it actually matches your use case.
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>>1982677
Are you handicapped? If so, then really cool you're doing it. If not, then why?
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>>1982685
I ride with my dog and she rides in my trike basket, trike is also very comfortable, I climb mountains with trikes and trailers with 130 pounds of gear the trike is about 55 pounds and the trailer is around 35 so it's the opposite of being disabled as I am more able than most when it comes down to being able, I also weigh 220 pounds and am 6,, I'm moving over 400 pounds by my strength alone across a continent, my last trailer was a burly bee two seat and it had crap wind resistance compared to my new set up, still I was doing 40 miles every day with that trailer
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>>1982677
Lol that's awesome.. does the feet forward position cause any issues on long rides
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>>1979364
>I've always tallied up the costs and came to the conclussion that driving would be way cheaper since you get to move faster, you will eat less and lodge less so your costs will be lower
I came to the same conclusion as well. I don't understand bike touring. It's ironically the most expensive way to travel. Isn't the point of riding a bike to save money? People say camp out but that's miserable and illegal in my country anyway. What if I got eaten by a bear?
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>>1982691
you sound retarded
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>>1982674
>what poorfag rear rack is gud?
what you want is lower arms that are not adjustable, like on the right

it's also nice to have dual top rails like on the left, which means you can run panniers lower and not mire the racktop.

Also on the left you see a disc rack, which has recessed lower bolts. This is bad unless you need it to get around your discs, because it makes the rack harder the tighten, and if you strip out the bolt heads, harder to remove.

You also don't want a rack which is excessively wide for the stance of your bike.

Really the poorfag rack is a used one, there are a lot floating round.
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>>1982674
I bought something named Delta from scamazon and it's held everything I've thrown at it for close to a decade. it doesn't have the lower side rail and I think the lower is adjustable so it's against the good recommendations anon gave you but meh, it werks.
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>>1982690
Not at all, it's very cozy, thanks for appreciating my unorthodox set up
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>>1982491
Semi-related: I had a flat fixed in Romania during a bike tour last year. The repair dude recommended he put some sealant inside the inner tube, said I'd never have to worry about flats again. I said okay mate that's bullshit but I believe it so he pumped the sealant into my tubes. After getting back home (Germany) without flats I decided to do some research on sealant + tubes.

The general consensus seems to be:
>won't do shit against large punctures
>not as effective as compared to tubeless
>shit's gonna be messy as fuck it you do get a puncture and the sealant fails to seal it
>you have to renew the sealant after a couple of months because it will dry

Overall negative. I recently put new tires on my bike and decided to replace the sealant-filled tubes as well. The sealant inside the tube was still liquid after six months. On the rear tube I did in fact spot a puncture that the sealant managed to seal completely. It was an impressive sight, and I made me feel kind of dumb for replacing the tubes.

It's just an anecdote though. Does anyone else have experience with putting sealants inside tubes?
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>>1982746
For any long tours, slap on some Marathons Plus and be done with it.

I did the 7200km >>1979711
without a single fucking puncture.

The one mistake I made was switching tires, and it created a lopsided part which was annoying.

But Marathon Pluses are the way.
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>>1982759
No, you rode in weak environments
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>>1982759
I once managed over 13k on the normal marathons without a flat but got a flat in my marathon plus last trip (glass shard). Your anecdote is useless, and the plus rolls like ass.

>>1982786
Also this.



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