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Have you ever been hiking in the winter? What should I know know before trying?

I've already been in mountains in winter once. It wasn't serious hiking, more like walking but I learned one thing. November in mountains is winter, even if it's fall in lower parts of the country. Packing fall clothes instead of winter clothes was stupid.

Also, post photos if you have any
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>>2669196
>It wasn't serious hiking, more like walking
What exactly do you think hiking is? As far as im concerned in winter it's literally no different except you wear warmer clothes and maybe wear microspikes.
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>>2669222
I mean I've only walked through valleys and a town. I haven't climbed on any mountain, escept for the one I rode in cableway
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If you can "walk" without skis or snowshoes it's not really "winter" /out/ing. You don't need to know anything, it's just hiking in a cold weather.
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are yak trax a waste of money for light hiking in wintry areas? It's not like deep snow here, more thin ice and snow that's hazardous.
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>>2669295
If you go often I'd say it's worth it for icy, inclined terrain. A couple times a season? I'd say just go without. If you do buy traction device I'd say spend the extra for the microspikes as yaktraxs break easily.
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>>2669196
I love hiking in winter, my advice, dress warm and in layers you can remove, winter hiking is a balance between staying warm, and not sweating in your clothes (thus making them cold), so rather than one thick warm waterproof jacket it’s better to have a thermal undershirt, sweater, down jacket, and raincoat so you can take off just as much as you need as you warm up. Also, a second pair of socks is always worth bringing.

As far as non clothing gear, snowshoes are awesome, a large thermos is awesome, or something like a jet boil and some tea/coffee for longer trips (there is nothing better than being able to have a hot drink in the cold whenever you feel like it) and micro spikes are great for ice. I haven’t tried it yet but I’d guess cross country skis are pretty good in some situations too
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One bonus pro tip, fill your thermos with hot mulled wine for maximum winter comfort on shorter hikes.
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>>2669222
>What exactly do you think hiking is?
Hiking means walking a substantial distance through wilderness terrain.
>>2669295
I was a little underwhelmed by Yak Trax. I would say their advantages are most noticeable on trampled down, hard-packed and smoothed out snow, the kind that can be slippery even with decent boots. Yak trax dig in with no problem. They also might help a little on slushy ice though often not much better than good boots. On thick, hard ice they are usually worse than having nothing at all
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Where do you want to hike? Out here in the Alps one of the main consideration in the winter is navigation as paths will not be clearly visible in fresh snow and in general you won't be able to see the markers on the ground/rocks. Another thing to consider is shorter days, especially in the valleys, it can get very dark already after 3:30-4 pm.
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>>2669293
Ok, so do you want to summit mountains in the winter? That's on the more extreme end of hiking. Otherwise it is what >>2669413 said is spot on. You don't need a super special amount of gear to walk, just extra warm clothes and some aids like spikes and trekking poles

>>2669295
Yesterday I had an opportunity to use mine again (diamond grip or whatever they call them) on an iced over waterfall area and I was a little bit underwhelmed. They certainly helped, but not exceptionally well. Although I was wearing a different pair of boots than I normally do with a smaller surface area, so the yak Trax were a little bit too large and were sliding around on the bottom of my feet. I'll probably test it again with my regular boots just to confirm, but I think I'll be upgrading to standard microspikes.
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>>2669196
too much snow to hike here but i snowmachine/ski/snowshoe
i really like being able to fuck around on rivers and lakes without bugs or bears so i may even enjoy it more than summer hiking
remember to not get sweaty or you will get cold as soon as you stop
it can get very dark very early depending on lattitude, light pollution, and weather conditions/moon phase
you are probably less likely to come across other people so make sure you are pretty self reliant

it really isn't a big deal, just don't go too far until you know what you are doing
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>>2669196
That's gorgeous, I wish we had winters like that here. (Maryland)
I will be moving out west inthe next few years
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Is merino wool clothing worth getting?
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>>2672483
also curious
I've done a lot of short winter day hikes, and on one occasion almost got frostbite on my itty bitty baby toe :(
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>>2672488
i got frostbite on both of my big toes some 30 years ago and its no fun i can tell you, they get cold pretty easily
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>>2669196
bring a down puffer midlayer and only wear it when you stop. check the dwr of your outer layer often.
if you want to do this seriously skip the snowshoes and get a pair of touring skis.
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>>2669196
Kino picture. My experience hiking on snow has been that it is pretty damn brutal though. I am not in good enough shape for it.
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>>2669196
Your sleeping bag is not warm at its rating. Prepare for weather to be colder and wetter than you think. If sleeping on an air mattress, consider bringing a insulite as well. Bring a reflective space blanket, they weigh and cost near nothing. Lots of carbs, hot drinks and some bourbon. Enjoy almost no one else being there.
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Begginer /out/er here, I was thinking about creating my own thread, but this is basically the same: I've recently experienced my first night /out/ sleeping in a cave with the outdoors temperature being around -8°C. I'm gonna repeat it next weekend and I wanted to ask for some advice as well as share some experience as an amateur to amateur. Layering and carrying extra dry layers of clothing is crucial, after hiking for 2 hours I've gotten to a very cold cave and without a dry sweater I would've definitely suffered until I could heat up the little stove. I'd forgotten to bring another pair of socks (had 2 pairs on me atm), which caused me some trouble. Other than that, make sure you have enough nutritious food, you're your own source of warmth and without fuel (food) you're screwed. Navigation in snow can be tricky, so make sure you know the path well or pick a straightforward one if new to the area (here the tourist marks are usually on trees/poles so they're visible in winter too). Other than that, I advice you to bring a buddy along with you, you never know.
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>>2673030
>>2669196
Didn't (you) you, if you have any other questions feel free
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>>2669196
>What should I know know before trying?
Take it slow, plan on everything taking more time and being more strenuous. You're going to want to have traction, get either Kahtoola microspikes or Hillsound Trail Crampons and bring poles even if you don't think you'll need them, remember the trip back down is much more dangerous. Other anons have touched on layering already, so I won't go into that but in addition I like to have a dry change of clothing in the car for the trip home. Warm drinks are nice but heavy, as for water make sure to use wide mouth bottles because they'll take longer to freeze over.
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>>2673032
Are poles really as useful as >>2673039
says?
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>>2672483
IMO generally no. Base layers for cold weather work best for transporting moisture. Synthetic fibers have the advantage of little to no moisture absorption as they don't hold water but rather it lays on its surface. Considering cold weather systems especially in high exertive output, scandinavian open weave synthetic base layers work best in these systems and most synthetics are just often cheaper. Most merino base layers improve warmth because of its higher fiber count per square inch but you should consider using your midlayer and last layer for insulation rather than your baselayer. Merino clothes should be considered for 2 reasons- Maximum warmth in your system when moisture control isnt a interested factor and 2. Odor control, I cant completely blame somebody for paying 10x more for a base layer if smelling like shit really puts you off.
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>>2669196
Yup, winters are pretty mild here. Winter hikes are more enjoyable for me because you just get a completely different view.

Snow and ice are pretty and nothing beats that cold, crisp air...
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you should know it's cold so you should dress warm
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>>2678900
Not if you're moving a lot. Wear a wind shell with the pit zips open and one or two light layers underneath. You want to keep cool and dry, not sweaty. Base camp is for dressing warm
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You are at the whim of nature much more than any other season. Weather can turn rapidly at elevation, conditions vary weekly, and yea it's cold which means if anything goes wrong you're in double trouble.

In the North East you have to pack for everything depending on what you're doing. An inch of snow at the trail turns to a foot of fresh powder 4000ft. Hiking poles are a must in the snow, especially if you're breaking trail. Microspikes are a must, snow shoes probably. Layers are even more important now, make sure you have enough to keep you warm if you're standing still. Do your best to avoid getting your clothes sweaty, and bring spare base layers if you're going deep. Always pack extra socks!
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>>2679223
If you're sleeping, plan on packing heavy and hiking shorter days. Or hike base-camp style where you set up camp and venture out, return at end of day, repeat for as long as you have food. Boiled water bottle in your bag really works wonders, I've made it through nights that were too cold for my bag doing that. Also hand warmers work great in your sleeping bag. Get an insulated pad, I've gone down to ~5F with a 4.5r inflatable + 2.0r foam.
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>>2679224
Store your water bottles upside down and in your pack to avoid freezing. Wear rubber gloves under your mitts to prevent your sweat from soaking into them. Do the same with ovenbags over your socks (some people do sock, oven bag, sock). Eat a shit ton of extra food, your body burns a lot of calories just keeping you warm. If your toes get cold and you can't warm them up, stick a hand warmer in your mitts and put your feet in the mitt. A nice little toe oven.

That's about all I got.
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>>2679225
Oh yea, have fun! Nothing give you that feeling of winning like a cold ass hike.
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>>2679225
>Store your water bottles upside down and in your pack to avoid freezing.
Jesus christ this is the worst advice i've seen here and that's something. This will just make those bottles to break and ruin your other stuff while they freeze, and if you're really "at the whim of nature" as you said it can literally kill you.
You should just keep a small bottle of water inside your coat close to your body, and either melt snow as you go or have heavier duty thermos containers to carry more.
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>>2679231
https://letmegooglethat.com/?q=store+nalgenes+upsidedown+in+winter

I was drunk last night and didn't specify nalgenes, they won't crack especially the opaque HDPE ones. But you should maybe think before you speak
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winter hiking is pure kino
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This was taken today... Three weeks ago it snowed beautifully. Now everything has melted away.

The black forest is odd. Bone dry, cold, then humid as fuck.
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>>2679421
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I just went winter hiking today actually! Representing my /out/ patch too.
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>>2669294
It's still possible to walk, but yeah you wont be having a good time.
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Brrr.... Bumping this thread for warmth
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Is snow a requirement? This is what winter hiking in a literal desert looks like.
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>>2681929
Actually let me share a photo with some more local flora
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>>2681929
>>2681930
Thunderbird Park?
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I swear the photo is right-side up on my computer
>>2681934
Yeah, what gave it away?
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>>2681938
Close to home. Been a few times myself. Besides the sheer sprawl of this city is instantly recognizable, and there's not a lot of those fancy lake neighborhoods up against mountain right next to a freeway.
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>>2669196
Get yourself some warm cloaths, wool preferably, also some kind of hardshell/softshell jacket is usefull. Also you'll need a good winter sleeping back, microspikes, impregnate your boots and i suggest wearing waterproof gaiters. I always also assume that in winter in 1 day i am able to walk about 60-70% of my normal one day distance, just to be safe. So you'll have some heavier shit in your backpack, buy some good cloathing, a little bit of gear, and you should be more carefull when navigating, when it's snowy it's way easier to loose the trail. But remember, hiking in realy high rocky as fuck mountains in winter is completly diffrent, these are just tips for your regular hiking in mountains that aren't fucked up deadly wasteland
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>>2669196
hiking in powder sucks dick. doing a multiday with a pack sucks even more dick.
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>>2669196
It's probably about 5x harder to walk in deep snow/ice layers
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Whats the meta for a hot tent wood stove? Are the 120 dollar amazon ones going to kill me in my sleep?
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>>2684019
Maybe. Dont take our word for it. Get it and have a co detector then take it for a test drive.
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>>2684023
Feels like a fast way to waste 120 on a stove, throwing the 120 i saved into a 300 dollar stove now 420
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>>2684019
Get one, and get a teepee because it vents well, no worries about co
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my favorite winter camping story
>we set off in small boats (megin jolle)
>go ashore, short hike to an old farm house / barn
>we kill some rabbits and chickens taht we brought, one girl missed the neck of a chicken entirely and just chopped off its face and beak with the axe. fun times
>meal was okay, over salted
>weather was supposed to be faire, gods said fuck that! you get heavy snow lmao
>in this old clapped out lavvu tent with an even shittier wood stove that keeps going out
>fingers so frozen i can barely use matches, snow coming in from the sides in banks
>drift off to sleep, finally, the sweet relief of death

>wake up to something tugging at my foot
"he won, he fucking won! this gonna be so fucking funny" says my Friend Lauritz
Trump just got elected
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November in the Olympics
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>>2684019
I have the Pomoly Hussar Plus 2.0 and the Pomoly Timber Stove.

Definitely chinkshit if you compare to a full bore canvas wall tent and steel stove, but for what it is it does really well.

"What it is" being a system that 2 people can comfortably split the weight between (just over 12 pounds between the tent and stove, not including stakes). In 15F weather we were able to maintain a comfy 60F inside the tent while the stove was burning. Its still difficult to keep the stove burning all night long, unless you want to wake up every hour to feed it, so you will still need a pretty solid sleep system.

Our go to method is to drag our winter camping gear in pulk sleds, have a 24 mile out and back planned in the Bitterroot wilderness coming up in a few weeks.

If you can bury it in snow a fair amount you will be much warmer. It also helps to use emergency blankets as reflectors on the interior walls, drives some heat back to the center before it can escape through the walls.

All in all it definitely makes for some extremely comfy trips, being able to cook real food in a pan on the stove really improves the vibe.
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>>2679490
Hiked Mount Washington now.

Was honestly a struggle. I had 3/8" spikes and I was slipping like hell on the Ammo trail. Recommend use full crampons starting now. Used a camelback, the water in the straw froze solid. Cloud coverage on the way back down amped up and had very low visibility, got lost for a bit. No injuries!
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>>2672761
i'm no expert but i think it depends on the snow. the snow can be very mushy and soft, in which case you will dip your leg higher than the knee with each step and it will be extremely exhausting, last winter i tried a trail and it was like that and had advanced only a couple km after more than an hour. but other times the snow will hold you and you can walk more or less normal, and even better than normal if you have crampons
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>>2669196
anyone have experience with verts?
it seems like they're mostly intended for steep ascents but are they a decent snowshoe alternative for more mellow traverses?
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>>2669196
it's nice
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>>2686264
Rei plush spotted
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>>2686264
Very nice, I tried taking the ammo up in 2022 but scrubbed out on a huge ice flow just past the alpine sign. When I looked at a map it seems like I was about a quarter mile from lake of the clouds.
Were you on kahtoolas or hillsounds? I've got kahtoola but apparently hillsounds have a slightly more aggressive spike. I don't know if my boots are really rigid enough to securely support full-on crampons.
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>>2686638
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>>2669196
finnaly snowed
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>>2687021
fake, it's summer in Australia right now.
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>>2687026
kek
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>>2686638
Oh hell yeah, I have a picture of that same waterfall! Apologies, it was a joke picture, it reminded me of Minus Morgul (yes, yes, shut up I'm a nerd), so I apologize for the blur/shitty quality. It was just to make a joke.
I used kahtoola, they were something like $60 at REI.
Very cool of you to hike it, man.
It was the first time for me hiking Mt Washington in the winter. I made jokes to my coworkers saying they'll see me next on the news as "another statistic" but I was genuinely nervous hiking alone. When I arrived, the AMC NH chapter were hiking it, so I felt a lot more comfortable, though.
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>>2687145
Here's a scenic picture of the back of the sign post in >>2686264 for something nice looking.
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can someone explain how snow works? how long does it need to be walkable, and why sometimes is too hard or too soft?

one of the times i went out i was going almost hip deep with each step and i was exhausted after a couple hours walking, and was advancing extremely slow. had to turn back. another time i was in steep terrain but i was doing fine making steps with my boots (had no crampons yet), i felt very secure but suddenly the snow changed and i could barely scratch it no matter how hard i smashed it with my boot, it was more ice than snow. i couldn't continue and it was a struggle to go back the way i came

what causes the snow to behave differently in each case? how do you know in advance how it will be, and how can you handle each case?
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>>2687145
Continuing my hikes. Weather was bad on Saturday and Sunday, but I could go on Monday.
I originally planned to hike Mt Flume, Mt Liberty, then cross the Franconia ridge into Little Haystack, Lincoln, and Lafayette, but I climbed up the Flume Slide and it was really difficult to hike up. Additionally, when I got to Mt Liberty, another hiker told me that somewhere along the ridge (I forgot where) was blow out and you'd need snowshoes to get across. I didn't have any. Also, the hike up Flume Slide was a workout and a half so I just climbed down Liberty instead. First ascent up Flume.
I guess according to the Internet, Flume Slide in the winter is the hardest ascent, well, I'm glad that's the case since I don't want to do that again for a long time.
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>>2689435
I forgot to mention that if you plan on hiking the Flume Slide in the winter, now's the time. It isn't a technical climb right now due to the snowfall but it might become one during this upcoming storm, who knows. I didn't climb it with an ice pick and I had no problems. It was just more stressful than I was expecting because I hadn't done it before.
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>>2689435
>>2689442
Looks great! I've been having some car trouble so I haven't been able to get up there since the 2nd.
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>>2689458
If you live near Boston, I live in southern Boston so I drive through I-93 and if you want to go hiking in these upcoming months! @kirbs:matrix.org or kribbles9@gmail.com.
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>>2689552
That's a very kind offer, but I'm not quite ready to hop into a strangers car and drive up into the mountains out of cell service. If you see me on track say hi though, I'm usually wearing a brown hill people gear pack with an /out/ patch.
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>>2690089
Damn
Almost had another one
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>>2690089
t. a woman or a man who isn't strong enough to defend himself
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>>2690127
>t. man with no survival instincts
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>>2690089
Yeah, fair enough. I'm just looking for people to go hiking with! Sorry. I'll keep posting my winter hiking trips, though. I'll be doing Lafayette again on Sunday, weather permitting of course.
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>>2690228
Good luck! I took falling waters up and bridle down when I did it, I wouldn't want to try descending all those iced water crossings. The last one where there's that steep overhang on the uphill side was kinda nasty, as well as the one before that (I think) which is at the base of a waterfall. The bog between lafayette and green leaf was frozen over when I was there, I'd assume it still is. If you have time, get your hands on a copy of "The Last Traverse" by Ty Gagne and read it before you go.
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>>2690318
Me and a fair number of others bailed. I did do the living waters trail up (as you recommended), but I also did it down since I bailed out. The "iced water crossings" were all snowed over, so it's perfectly safe.
That being said, the winds on Franconia ridge were too strong for me. The gusts were against me and knocking me down on my hands and knees every 30 seconds and people in snowshoes and poles were stuck in place while that was happening. My feet were getting blown out from under me every step. I probably could have kept on going, just waiting out every gust, but I'm not a danger junkie. I guess the gusts were up to 60 mph because trees were groaning and a few were uprooted.
Audio in this webm is extremely loud. The winds further up were more severe, but I could pull out my phone here. It was honestly really awesome to be blown around by the wind, but I wasn't planning on dying.
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>>2691762
Sorry, forgot to post the link to the video, recommend downloading first since the bitrate is really high: https://files.catbox.moe/qvrs68.mp4
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>>2690318
>>2691762
>>2691764
Glad you're saying safe. Did you hear about the popsicle they pulled off Guyot last week? Poor guy, he was a really strong hiker. Triple Crown, Direttissima, the works.
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>>2693558
Yeah, I also heard that there was a group of 21 (or 23?) in the green mountains that got lost and had to call for rescue. 6 kids. I couldn't imagine how terrifying it would have been for them. I'm a little confused how not a single phone worked for them or how lost they were, but wow.
No winter hiking this week for me, needed to clean up the ol' apartment and not just eat garbage for another week. Also had a little 4chan meetup in Boston for dinner.
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>>2669196
lol
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I hiked North and South Kinsman. This is the view of the Franconia ridge across I-93, featuring Layafette on the left (>>2679490) and Flume (>>2689435) on the right.
The hike was nice and simple. Very slow incline the entire time and I felt like I was back in the west where there are switchbacks. The buckles on my boots sheared off from >>2691762 and I bought new boots. I'm glad I took this hike since I had 3 blisters (and popped) from this hike. Climbing up the 2nd peak was not the most fun. I also was playing some sports earlier and so I exhausted myself on this hike. Good stuff, good starting hike up Kinsman.
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>>2695807
bump
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how does one protect against avalanches or holes in the terrain that are hidden by snow, like near the top of mountains where it's full of boulders but they're covered in snow so you cant see the gaps between them
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i recently got my Danish endurance merino wool base layer, long sleeve shirt and pants, havent tried them on a hike yet, but I used it once for rucking, i had a softshell and the base layer, wasn't very cold, like 5C, but I sweated like a motherfucker and was completely drenched, definetly was dressed to heavily but idk if it was the merino or just the 2 things together.
in the mountains where it was -8C I only wore a softshell with everything unzipped, and a viscose long sleeved shirt, I started with a waffle top under the softshell butnhad to change it straight away bc it was too hot
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>>2698445
>>2698448
Oh, this buffoon again.
You "protect" yourself against avalanches by not going into avalanche terrain if you need to ask that question on 4chan. Hell, you don't even know how to layer clothes.
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>>2698445
Ground-penetrating radar
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No matter how warm you think you are when you fall asleep, you’re gonna freeze in the morning so plan accordingly. Once i was doing hamocking in winter in -15 Celsius weather and managed to knock the underquilt off from under me in my sleep and I awoke a while later shaking to the bone and had to relight the fire and sit by it for the rest of the night to get warm again, I had 5 or so bottles filled with ~100 degree water stuffed into my clothes to get extra heat.

Fucking hell that was cold.
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>>2681938
I knew you were a valleyfag. Did you take this photo from Troon North?
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>>2698496
dude the hot water canteen is based, I use the steel nalgene for it, I boil it straight in it with my gas stove and it feels good
one time I was retarded and went in a mountains in summer, but still it was like 2100m, I was in shorts and t shirt with a sleeveless parka and a summer sleeping bag, I woke up multiple times, the last of which was at like 6am and I was shivering so since there was some light I started my descent, cool story to think back to but was retarded
>>
>>2698543
>troon north
>this is an actual place
lmao
Anyway not that anon but no, it's Thunderbird Conservation Park.
>>
>>2669196
Carry an extra under layer. Swap it when sweaty
>>
>>2686324
snow shoes work with Pressure = Force/Area
A is small so shoe is bad
do not buy the meme shoe



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