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New USDA zone map has been released: https://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/

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previous: >>2701568

Spring has arrived.

Remember to leave some of your carrots in the ground so that you have plenty of carrot seed for next year. Yes, the white ones are a little bland, but they add a variety of color to your meal.
>>
You have to admit; a lawn that is really nicely taken care of, does look quite beautiful.
>>
>>2710301
Nah, fuck lawns. I'd rather see crops, flower beds, or proper grassland.
>>
>>2705052
>>2705054
Place your bets if these hazlenut bushes survive the winter waterboarding.
>>
>>2710301
Even most beautifully kept lawn looks like shit if garden itself is designed badly.
Its just well kept shit.
Also, not a fan of useless green swatches of land, especially if they are big and monoculture.
>>
>>2710452
Mine survived 50cm of water for two weeks or so.
So did almost every plant.
Even the rhubarb that I thought was 100% dead, somehow after a year started to poke its leaves again.
Floods are overrated.
>>
>>2710467
>Mine survived 50cm of water for two weeks or so.
Yeah, but this thing could be there for a month or more. I have no idea how or when that water will leave that place, I know by summer it's not an issue, but no telling how long it will stay there during the winter/spring.
>>
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Post your seedlings
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>>2710493
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>>2710536
>>
>>2710452
>>2710490
You really should put in some drainage. It's cheap and easy to do plus your bushes won't stay dormant as long.
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>>2710536
>>
>>2710542
What kind of drainage can I make there when it's half flooded and half frozen? It's also the lowest point in that area.
>>
STOP FUCKING RAINING 1-2 DAYS EVERY WEEK I NEED TO TILL MY SHIT BEFORE LAST FROST JESUS FUCK
>>
>>2710546
Try an auger if you have one. I'm in zone 5 and I've been able to get shovels into the dirt for the last couple weeks. Even if the total area isn't enough to drain all the standing water it will soak into the soil faster.
>>
>>2710554
Have you considered no till?
>>
>>2710237
>live in bwh
>only other property is csa
What the fuck do I grow bros ahhhhhhhh
>>
>>2710237
>weather warms up, plant seeds
>seedlings ready to move outside, weather goes straight back to frost with 40mph winds
I guess I'll just buy young tomato plants this year, then
>>
>>2710601
Always.
>>
>>2710601
Do you not normally plan around your average last frost date?
>>
>>2710615
That's the thing about the average, anon. It's based off of a variation.
>>
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>>2710554
>>
>>2710536
>>2710537
do you seed directly into the cups?
>>
>>2710601
Fellow northeasterner
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>>2710674
No, I use 72 or 50 cell 10/20 trays and then pot them up, whatever ones pass the grade. Ideally I wouldn't use the cups as they are larger than I need or like and not UV rated and are drink cups I had left over from a BBQ. I used all of my 2.5-3.5 pots for strawberry clones and sold a bunch. Do what you can with what you have.
>>
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I started growing stuff more seriously on my balcony last year and it was a lot of fun, but I got started too late into the year and missed a few important times because of that. Trying to be better this year.
Firstly, I bought a red currant (Ribes rubrum) at a hardware store last year. If had already flowered when I got it and had very little fruit. I wanted to prune it now before it has much growth, but have no idea what to cut and where. Picrel is the plant, my issue is that my rule of thumb I was taught was "keep about 2-3 old shoots and 3-4 new/young shoots, cut down everything else. Cut any shoots that are too close to each other or competing too much for sunlight. But if I look at the plant in picrel I seem to have 5 old shoots and 1 new shoot (at least at the base). Do I not prune it at all this year then? Or do I cut all but 3 shoots? What would you do anons?
Second thing is I have no idea when to plant my chili seeds. I'm in germany, and the chilis will grow in sub irrigated planters on my west facing balcony. I can get them started in a small plastic enclosure/greenhouse, but then they'd go straight to the planters, I don't have pots to transfer them to between that. I can put the planters inside if needed, but then they won't have much sunlight compared to on the balcony. Apparently according to some website my area is the equivalent of the USDA 8a/8b zones (it's pretty close to the border). When do I best plant the chili seeds?
Thanks for any advice anons, you getting me into growing stuff on my balcony last year was a very rewarding process.
>>
>>2710889
>What would you do anons?
I can't see depth with only this photo but I would only cut one shoot in the middle from what I can see they seem to be growing way too close to each other

>When do I best plant the chili seeds?
Right now, it's already late for starting them in zone 8

>they won't have much sunlight compared to on the balcony
You can just put them under a strong LED bulb

If you want something nice I recommend draping a grapevine, gifted one to my sister (zone 6 btw) and over 5 years it grew all over her balcony and she got about 10 kg of grapes last year, they are pretty easy to prune to keep them from shading or growing over other things too.
>>
>>2710868
I used to use 72 cell trays, but I changed them out to 32 cell trays to hopefully have to avoid repotting 2-3 times. They are working well so far, but I'm worried the peppers in my pic might need a repot before last frost (mothers day)
>>
>>2710895
Thanks for the advice, I will cut the middle shoot tomorrow when I have daylight. If you say I'm already a bit late, should I prime the seeds in some warm water for 2 days or so? Or go straight into the soil (in the plastic container).
Grapevine would be great, but I'm only renting and don't know for how much longer I'll be here, so probably not a good time to get started with something like that. At my parents house there a giant one so they have an oversupply each year anyways, so I'll get some great grapes when I visit them anyways.
Can't wait to eventually own a real garden though and be able to do long term projects.
Thanks for the help anon.
>>
>>2710904
Better prime them until they start germinating, it's way faster this way.
Unless you have a heat mat or something like this to put your containers on obviously.
>>
>>2710899
I agree. I only use 72 indoors and pot up for winter starts. In season I run 50's and go straight to the ground from them for annual vegetables. 50 is a sweet spot I've always liked. Hopefully this year I can sell enough to invest in Winstrip trays, and not have to worry about any potting up.
>>
>>2710889
You plant chilis and paprikas in january, february or march. Take them outdoors when nights are warmer than 10C. You can bring them back in in the autumn before it freezes and they can actually survive. Trim them down thoroughly to get rid of passengers.
A greenhouse is nice, but I had a heap of chilis growing on my scandi balcony. Winter was messier as icy drafts put most of them into a zombie state where they looked okay but were just dead.
Right now? Just get some dude's ready-propagated stuff.
>>
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I'm so frustrated I can't garden this year. I had two greenhouse and 50ish square feet of cold frame .
I'll sneak a few potted plants here or there to tide me over.
>>
>>2710592

No, because there is invasive Wiregrass here that will take over just about anything and I need to till and spray til dead to at least keep it at bay for a few months
>>
Does anyone here grow berries of any sort? Would you recommend a container or bed grow for someone low on space?
>>
>>2710965
You could try putting cardboard down on top of it and planting through the cardboard. That's how I deal with grass.
>>
>>2710965
Sheet mulching, tarping or solarizing would be way better alternatives.
>>
>>2710974
>Does anyone here grow berries of any sort?
Yea

>Would you recommend a container or bed grow for someone low on space?
Not really unless you have something you really like and can't source it locally or you want minimal effort home grown food, veggies are just better when it comes to space utilization.
However:

>Any edible vines like grapevines or anything vertical like rigid blackberries or a shrub you would prune to shape (better get something that doesn't grow too strongly) like currant or tall haskap cultivar
They can be put planted next to a wall or a fence, minimal space requirements and won't shade anything (assuming fence faces South into your property)

>Fruit trees
Can be cleared of branches at first two-three meters creating partially shaded growing area underneath (depends on sun angle in your geographic location) or even no lost sunlight if it shades a neighbor or a street

>inb4 some of those aren't berries
Wrong, grapevines are true berries and mulberry tree is a thing
>>
>>2710554
>till
>>
>>2710955
>I'm so frustrated I can't garden this year
the fuck are you talking about?
>>
>>2710868
Do you make a profit selling plugs?
>>
>>2710965
Landscape fabric covered in bark. Your garden will look better, it'll be neater, your plants will be easier to take care of and harvest. Choose the right type of fabric and there are virtually no downsides.
>>
>>2711126
Landscape fabric is garbage.
>>
Where did no till cultists invade /hgm/ from?
>>
>>2711164
YouTube maybe, idk.
People obsessed with soil bacteria and doing no labor.

Gardening is absolutely chock with misinformation and useless practices. I'm not saying noTill has no merit, I'd just take it with a pinch of salt. Even if it is from a book or a popular youtuber.

YouTube popularity does not solely select for veracity
>>
>>2711164
>>2711166
Hey man, your here whining about rain because "I need muh till and roundup" because you don't know how to deal with grass and I put down free cardboard and am done with it. Tilling is a waste of time that ultimately destroys your soil structure.
>>
My tulips got covered in 7 inches on snow, please don’t die.
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>>2711190
Are you me, that just happened to me last night too
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>>2711202
I can’t get to them, my walker can’t make it through the snow
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>>2711190
>>2711202
They should be fine under the snow
>>
>>2711164
Listen man, these threads are the last bastion of hippies and other wanna be "organic is all the way" no property city farmers.

I would say no tilling is probably the least insane thing hippies come up with but ultimately I'm not the one complaining about not being able to work my soil.
>>
>>2711113
Yes. But its really only 3 months out of the year its viable, usually April-June it booms and obviously drops off a cliff after. It covers all of my farming expenses for the year, plus the following years start-up and puts a few hundred in my pocket.
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>>2711166
No till practices are usually considerably more labor intensive that pushing/sitting on a tiller and spraying roundup
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>>2711240
Depends on what you're doing. Double digging is definitely more work.
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>>2711190
>>2711202
RIP
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>>2711272
No!!!!!
>>
Whats the most exotic thing you guys are growing?
This year I'm going to try growing tobacco. I just got the seeds in today
>>
>>2711293
Peruvian groundcherry I guess but it refuses to germinate after a month of waiting so I might have no luck with it this year
>>
>>2711293
Toothache herb
>>
>>2711293
Where do you get your seeds from?
>>
>>2711319
Seed store
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>>2711164
>Where did no till cultists invade /hgm/ from?
They were....home grown, on site.
>>
>>2711261
>Double digging is definitely more work.
>double digging
>no till
Hello?
>>
>>2711365
No till and no dig are different.
>>
>>2711370
they are as different as using a shovel or a tractor to achieve the same end
>>
>>2711319
eBay
>>
>>2711377
Not really. No dig systems don't disturb the soil at all. When you transplant seedlings it's into compost put on top of the soil. No till systems don't use tillage, but might disturb soil in other ways even though the intent is to decrease soil disturbance.
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>>2710493
Peppers, tomatoes, artichokes, onions, rhubarb, peanut and herbs
I have to squeeze everything on my desk this year, did ghetto setup with those 3900 lumen (each) LEDs because my window doesn't get enough light
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>>2711305
I was just checking my seedlings and a single (1) peruvian groundcherry finally germinated after 32 days, kek
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>>2710493
It's been really cold in my sun room so not much has come up, only the 'maters that I put a heating mat under and the romanesco. Brought my fruit trees inside because it got really cold the other night but I should be planting all of them+2 more tomorrow. I need a bigger table
>>
>>2711467
based. I got a packet of ornamental stick peppers at a seed swap, the packet was expired in 2004 and it just germinated after about 50 days.
>>
>>2711490
Nice trees bro.
I bought myself persimmon tree this year.
I'm beyond excited to plant this bitch.
Still need to get a new fig, some more rhubarbs and some random seeds ofc but this year is looking pretty, pretty good.
>>
Peanuts are so vigorous, it didn't even pop it's leaves out yet but the roots are already escaping from 0.5 liter container.
Not really surprising considering just how big the seed is.
>>
>>2711589
I fucking hate peanuts and the squirrels who plant them in my garden.
>>
>>2711590
It’s not the squirrels Anon, it’s me, I sneak in at night and plant peanuts to take over your garden area.
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Everyone tells me to mulch cause it's hot as balls here, but mulch REALLY ups the pest pressure on my garden. I start getting ants and beetles living in there and overtaking my plants almost every time I use wood shavings.

Is there any solution to this? Or is this a "just live with it" sort of situation...
>>
I've introduced a cutworm into the house somehow.
Woke up this morning, 7 seedlings have been decapitated.

I fucked up by using soil from outside in my seedling mix.
Fucked. Totally fucked. And I cant find the bastard now so I must quarantine each tray until it rears its ugly head.
>>
>>2711944
Can’t blame the cutworm, you were the one who used outdoor soil, did you learn your lesson?
>>
>>2711915
You can make a pretty good pest repellent from citrus peels
>>
I will come into your garden at night, I will pick the best veggies you have and I will take a bite out of them to see how good they really are and no you cannot stop me.
>>
>>2711992
I will come into your garden.
I will bite off any lower branches and leave them there.
I will chew just enough bark to kill the new trees.
I will headbutt and break anything that can't be chewed.
Nothing personal kid, that's just how I roll.
>>
>>2711999
I will call the how
I will get them to tear down your eyesore of a “garden”
I will get you fined
I will not see you destroy lawns to make a “garden”
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>>2712009
How long until food stamps and skipping breakfasts won't be enough?
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>Decide it's time to cut down old pear tree overtaken by ivy, it's quite sturdy but it'll collapse eventually surely
>There is no tree inside, only ivy
It didn't even budge until ivy was cut, it was like a strangler fig
>>
Anybody else make seed bombs and casually throw them into neighbors yards? Or just in areas you’re walking?
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>>2712046
That's cool, if you had known the tree was gone would you have just left it?
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>>2712091
Nah, while it did look really cool, I have limited space and I want edible fruits, not ivy.
I'll be planting a plum in this place next week.
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>>2712135
Looked like this inside the crown, took a lot of time to disassemble it.
>>
>>2712135
>>2712138
I would definitely have kept it myself but if you want fruiting trees it makes sense that it had to go.
Do you know what type of ivy it was, I would like to try doing that if I can.
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>>2712148
Common European/English Ivy (Hedera helix).
There are nice cultivars bred for looks and other qualities but it's not one of them, just something that commonly grows over trees in forests here, like this one near where I live, large specimen, climbed over 20 meters to reach this pine's crown.
I have more of it on my Northern fence, it's a really good pollinator attractor in mid-late Autumn, there are so many of them over it at that time you can hear them from 10 meters away.
I wouldn't recommend planting it where it's an invasive tho, it spreads really easily thanks to birds, we have to remove new sprouts under trees from bird poo every year.
>>
>>2711915
>I start getting ants and beetles living in there
good?
>>
>research pruning trees, planting trees, etc
>internet is filled with a bunch of contradictory info
how the hell am I supposed to decide with philosophy I believe?
>>
I actually went to Lowes yesterday. I’m zone 9. Appalled by last year’s prices, this year I set out to grow everything from seed, if possible, telling myself I would buy anything that didn’t germinate. I already grew a good bit from seed, but this would be an effort to grow all. I dumpster dived some shelves and attached grow lights. I scrounged some inexpensive trays. All tolled I was out about $125 including seeds and dirt. I told myself I would pay for this in savings from one year. Everything is growing except for my parsley, hence the trip to Lowes. And JEEZUZ CHRIST. If I had bought everything from Lowes as starter plants that I already had at home I would have spent over $300! Not only did I already pay for my setup but I’ve already saved about $200. They were pulling crazy shit like selling single potted bell pepper plants for $6. WHAT. THE FUCK.
>>
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>>2712350
I have a theory that garden centres deliberately stock awful soil/compost so that any attempt to grow from seed at home is thwarted, and people just resort to buying overpriced plugs.
>>
Is it worth rolling the dice with seed-grown hazelnut trees, or should I just pay 400% more for rooted suckers?
>>
>>2712350
Use can use biochar as a replacement for vermiculite or peat in seed starting mediums. It can be a lot cheaper, especially if you make it yourself or crush lump charcoal.
>>
>>2712368
I grow everything from seed and have ran farms and nurseries. I think you're right. I supplement and mix anything I get from big box stores.
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>>2712406
Why not both? The months and years I save by purchasing established trees and root stock is worth it imo. But I'm also going to start my own.
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>>2712265
Fruit trees? How big?
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>>2712446
Thanks! I’ll look into that. Right now I have a sizable stash of vermiculite, peat, and potting soil I found at a salvage center, so I really stocked up. I also found there tons of these fancy pop out seed starting trays that use little soil and take up little shelf space. I really got lucky that day. Also about that salvage center I got lucky again last weekend at that place. They had irrigation drip kits dumped onto a $3 clearance table. They’re cheap Chinese garbage but they retail for around $40 a kit. So soon I’ll get to experiment with those when everything is in the ground (I still have about a week or so here to wait.)
>>
Not having a job at the moment is a blessing, I have never gotten so much done in Spring and it's not even April yet
At this rate I'll run out of things to do by Summer
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>>2712265
Buy my pruning course and you'll get it right
Only 200$ plus tax, such a steal
>>
>>2712368
You might be onto something, I bought a seed starting mix this year and it was not only more expensive per liter but also far worse than a standard potting mix I used last year.
I wish my soil didn't have so much clay then I could just use my own soil after sterilizing it in oven.
>>
>>2712495
I know you are joking but I've seen $100 pruning courses and was like what the fuck?
Just watch 1 video and prune away.
If you fuck it up, it will grow back.
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Guys, I have a pepper seedling with three (3) cotyledons, what in the fuck
It's supposedly a "Nocturne" sweet pepper
>>
>>2712511
It's a mutant.
I had one where the two baby leaves were split in the middle and some of the adult leaves were V-shaped.
>>
>all 2 of my rhubarbs survived winter
Amazing, but now I have different problem.
What the fuck do I do with it?
Rhubarb pie sounds like something that would be better if I replaced rhubarb with any other fruit.
>>
>>2712490
Nice. I usually use 1020 trays filled with toilet paper tubes that have been cut in half and filled with a starter mix. I find it's easier to pull them apart then it is to get them out of the inserts. You should also check out mycorrhizal fungi and vermicompost. Both can help with germination.
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Rate my tomatoes
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>>2712543
Why are they red?
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>>2712505
>If you fuck it up, it will grow back.
nta, but I wholeheartedly subscribe to this mentality. Plants are forgiving like that, at least some of them are.
>>
>>2712511
>>2712513
Huh, kinda interesting. Please monitor this for curiosity sake.
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>>2712523
Pies and compote.
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>>2712265
>>research pruning trees, planting trees, etc
>>internet is filled with a bunch of contradictory info
>how the hell am I supposed to decide with philosophy I believe?
1) There is a limited number of things that you must abide. Those most important are probably already obvious to you.
2) There's no single ultimate way of handling trees. That's why you find so divergent info.
For instance, you can grow fruit trees intensively - keep them short, plant them close, fertilize intensively, replace trees after a dozen of years.
But you can grow fruit trees the old way, which is in a reasonable distance between trees, letting them grow much taller, fertilize them less, and let them fruit for half a century.
Those two ways are quite contradictory, but they lead to roughly the same yield per area. The intensive one lets you react more flexibly to changing market demands, and pays itself off quicker, hence it got so popular today.
Now, it's up to you how to grow your trees.

>>2712511
As far as I looked for an explanation once I got some apple seeds sprout three cotyledons, this just sometimes happens to any plant. For apples, all growth later on was just normal. For winter savory that did the same to me, several levels of leaves were tripled, and then suddenly boom! and all above that had normally two opposite leaves on each level.
>>
>>2712459
fruit trees, berry bushes, nut tress/bushes
>How big?
All kinds, from old and big, to old and trimed down, to newly planet, to some years old.
Lets start with a single question.
How much can you cut off a tree in one season. I see people saying 1/3 and 25% being the maximum a tree can safely handle in one season.
Is that right?

Second, people keep yapping about pruning to stimulate growth(usually in spring/fall) and pruning during the summer to retard the growth.
Is that right?

Modified central leader seems to me like a more sctructually study option.
But the open cup design seems to be better in terms of reach and keeping the tree down/small.

Take note that all the plants discussed don't have dwarf root stock.
So they will grow more tall naturally.

>>2712495
thats exactly what you get, the buy my book, go to my website, buy my course
>>2712557
It's possible to kill a tree if you do it really wrong, but the main cost you incur is time. Yeah any plant will regrow for the most part, but the question is how many years will you set yourself back.
Don't know about you, but I don't want to make mistakes that cost me years of progress, if I can help it.

>>2712625
>1) There is a limited number of things that you must abide. Those most important are probably already obvious to you.
Nonononono Don't fucking do this.
Don't say "the important thing is the obvious thing, so I wont state what the important thing is"
Never do this.
State the obvious if it's important, don't assume.

>2) There's no single ultimate way of handling trees. That's why you find so divergent info.
Of course, but it's mad how many people have different systems for this shit.
>>
>>2712499
>I wish my soil didn't have so much clay
clay is fine, just learn to handle it
> own soil after sterilizing it in oven.
You making bricks boy?
>>
>>2712645
No, I mostly do clay pots, not bricks, clay purity here is so good I don't really need to prepare it, it's not that good for plants tho.
Furthermore standard oven can only do about 250 Celsius and soil is sterilized in less than that and that's not even close of what you need for proper clay firing, even when you are aiming for low temperature water porous ceramics, that takes at very least 800 C.
>>
>>2712657
>soil is sterilized
why the fuck would you turn your soil, into dirt?
>>
>>2712661
So I don't get nasty surprises like this guy >>2711944
Using unsterilized garden soil for starting seedlings is just asking for trouble
>>
>>2712662
you do more harm than good in my opinion.
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>>2711490
OK I lied I actually planted some today, I only managed to get the Pink Lady and the Honeycrisp in the ground. Beneath the 2 inches of topsoil is entirely clay and rocks, and I spent almost an hour digging an 80lb rock out of the near hole. Hopefully I can get my peaches (Contender, Redhaven) in the ground tomorrow, and if I can remove the other two lilacs I will plant my cherries (Montmorency, Bing)
>>
>>2712657
I agree with this anon >>2712661. There are a lot of microbes that are beneficial to germination. I always spray my seed trays with a mycorrhizal inoculant after I seed them so they germinate sooner and grow bigger.

I think you should try mixing 25% compost/vermicompost, 25% biochar, and 50% soil and see how it does as a seed starting medium. If it's still too clayey then up it to 50% biochar and it should be really loamy.
>>
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>>2712667
I posted about these lilacs last thread, I had the city come out and spray the underground lines and it turns out I'm a cunt hair away from not being able to dig them out. Picture doesn't do them justice, absolute units
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>>2712668
>I think you should try mixing 25% compost/vermicompost, 25% biochar, and 50% soil and see how it does as a seed starting medium. If it's still too clayey then up it to 50% biochar and it should be really loamy.
Real men use bricks!
>>
>>2712644
>How much can you cut off a tree in one season.
>pruning
I often cut and prune as part of my job.
When its a non-fruit tree, the reason is to mainly get rid of certain limbs to introduce more sunlight, or take the top off because its just too tall.
Basically we just loop shit off, slather the cut with gardening tree paste if its not a needletree and its all fine. As long as three does not become unbalanced from missing limb.
There is some concern for tree cuts weeping during spring, but its not a very big deal. As long as you seal the cut with paste and leave some of the crown, it should be fine. Hell, some species are so lively they start shots from a stump left from a straight cut-down.

When its fruit trees its mainly getting rid of long wild shots that go straight up to the sky. Beyond that, getting rid of any dry limbs and halving any new long shots that do not go up. Sometimes thinning out the crown when its too crowded and tangled.
I think its supposedly best done before winter, but we also do this at spring, so dunno.
Summer sounds like it would be troublesome, with blooms and fruits and whatnot.

I don't know much about gardening, but as I return to the same places again and again I don't see those trees having troubles.
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>>2712685
from this
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>>2712689
to this
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>>2712673
Damn. I've never had good results with something that high in clay. Is the trick to keep the moisture at the right level?
>>
I'm in Zone 6, and I have some plants that aren't showing signs of life after winter.

How long should I wait before giving up on the following?

Crepe myrtles (allegedly the cold-hardy Natchez variety)
Golden Delicious apple tree
Flame willow saplings
Blackthorn seeds (I planted 20-odd to cold stratify)
Cold-hardy kiwis (ditto)
Cold-hardy fig trees
>>
>>2712719
I hate that. I’m zone 9 and just had to uproot and throw away a hibiscus and soon probably a myer lemon tree. We had a January deep freeze that was too much for them. I waited until well after everything else began budding and leafing while they did nothing. I checked for any color in the trunk or branches. I then bent the branches to see if they had some bend or snapped off. With the hibiscus there were no buds, no color, and the twigs snapped. So then I dug to check the roots and found they were dead. So out of the ground and into the woods it went. I’m pretty sure the lemon tree gets dug up next. We’re told by people selling things that “yeah these work well in your area/ are a cold/heat resistant variety” but what I have learned the hard way is if I see nobody else growing it, or see none growing wild or on their own in abandoned properties, don’t buy it.
>>
>>2712719
Wait until July for most things, honestly. Apple trees should be budding and should show life come April. Hardy kiwis are really slow to get going. "Hardy" fig trees die to the ground if it gets near 0 and regrow from the central root mass.
>>
>>2712734
To add, with most things you can tell if they're dead or dormant. I know you can with hardy kiwi where it's pretty easy to trace vines back to where dead wood meets living plant.
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>>2712700
>Damn. I've never had good results with something that high in clay. Is the trick to keep the moisture at the right level?
The biggest trick, is to fluff up the soil, drop it in the container in a light and airy fashion and DO NOT PAT IT DOWN!
Do not compact the soil in any manner. No pat downs, nothing. Plop the seed/plant into it with minimal force.
Afterwards water the containers from below, rather than pouring water on top.
I found this to be key for seeds or bigger plants.
Pic related. Compare it to the other pic.

So again, the key with working with clay is you do not want to compact it in any manner whatsoever. Just grab when it's fluffy, drop it into a container or even ground, and plop seeds and plants into it, with no compressing.
>>
Anyone here grow mushrooms?
Honestly it's quite tempting, especially with how small a space it takes up and the "Grow once harvest forever" people seem to advertise...

Is it actually true? Apparently after I get a set of mushrooms, I just take apart the mycelium inside, split it into new buckets with fresh substrate, and the new buckets will produce again.

If it is then it's -very- tempting. Like, I could definitely setup a humidity-controlled tent and have them producing in there...
>>
>>2712719
Wait, sometimes they take really long to wake up.
For example this year one of flowering quinces I planted last Autumn looks like it's dead while other flowering quinces are already starting to flower and have leaves growing but I looked a bit closer and it has a few still small but clearly alive buds just above the ground.
>>
>>2712719
>Blackthorn seeds
I recommend planting them in Spring (right now) instead, from fruits that still remain on other bushes after winter.
They grow way stronger than stuff that is seeded in Autumn and don't die during Winter nearly as often.
>>
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Should i transplant the extras into their own cells? I don't know why i wouldn't, seeds are expensive
>>
>>2712797
What is stopping you?
Just pluck one of them out and put into a fresh cell
>>
>>2712798
I can't think of any reasons, just double checking
>>
Sorry anons I know it's been 5 days, I forgot to monitor the thread.
>>2710928
I did prime them, figured I wasn't going to lose anything from not doing it.
>>2710946
This is great advice for next year anon, thanks. I've got to get started earlier it seems. I'll stick with my seedlings though, I started around the same time or later last year and still got 1-2 harvests from my chilis, so it'll be enough to get some fruits plus seeds for next year at least, even if I am missing out on a full harvest. I might also try overwintering some of my plants this year.
>>
>>2712758
>"Grow once harvest forever" people seem to advertise
Yeah just like I can grow any other vegetable, and replant the seeds and "harvest forever"
>>
>>2712800
>I can't think of any reasons, just double checking
Do you have enough space in the garden? I fell into that trap, splitting out every cell, and then they all grew huge and I had to scramble to find people to take them because I had no space
>>
>>2712797
Sometimes I leave multiples in the cells and make them fight to the death
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>>2712758
If by harvest forever you mean have them growing in your walls until your house collapses then you are correct
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>>2712741
I'll try that out. Thanks, man.
>>
>>2712797
I always leave them. Some plants do better when they're planted as a pair, like peppers.
>>
>>2712758
>Apparently after I get a set of mushrooms, I just take apart the mycelium inside, split it into new buckets with fresh substrate, and the new buckets will produce again.
This is true, but eventually your senescense will kill it. Some people believe you can prevent senescense by feeding your fungi a diverse range of food.
>>
>>2712818
This pic is fake I think. I scoured the web online abuot oyster mushrooms being aggressive, other pics of people having them grow and eat their house, and I can't find a thing, (Usually if someone has mushrooms in their house they're some kind of ink cap)
>>
How do I convince my pear tree to let out new shoot from roots?
I want to cut down the current main trunk because it's was badly pruned and has really bad shape.
>>
My dad owns a small business nursery. He lets me take pretty much anything I want.
I'm going to be planting some herbs, as many blueberry bushes as I can, yellow watermelons (I'm autistic about watermelons), and some peppers.
I'm also gonna expand my native plant garden. I love coreopsis so much. Still learning about beekeeping, but I'll do what I can to supply native pollinators until then. Will continue my conquest of grass. At least the grass in my lawn is native to the region, though.
>>
>>2712954
>yellow wutarmelons

i grew one and it turned out to be orange
>>
>>2712894
Pear trees are generally set on root stock, so if you cut down the tree, if you take it below the graft line, you'll end up with whatever the root stock variety is instead of whatever variety the tree above the graft line was. Just to note it.
>>
>>2712974
Unless I'm just totally wrong. I was under the assumption pear trees were grafted, but now I'm unsure. Still, best to check. Then you don't accidentally screw yourself.
>>
>>2712734

Thanks. I guess I'm going to have to give up on the fig trees, then, because we're guaranteed to get at least one 2-5 day stretch of near-zero or below-zero temps every winter.

Good news is that I only paid $5 each, $10 total.

>>2712773

I appreciate the suggestion, but, I'm in West Virginia. We don't have any of them growing wild locally, and I haven't found any local nurseries that stock them yet. I had to order this batch of seeds from Europe.
>>
Typically, how much volume is a 25kg bag of compost?
I'm trying to figure out how many bags I need to fill a new raised bed, but the shops won't tell me the volume per 25kg bag.
>>
>>2712974
It's not grafted, my grandfather rooted it from a cutting.

>>2713050
Depends a lot on moisture, dry can easily have half the weight of wet which is why it's usually sold by volume not weight.
>>
>>2713017
One trick with figs in the cold is that you can keep them in pots and the bring them in during the winter. I'm not sure how well figs work as an herbaceous perennial, though. I've never tried it or researched it.
>>
>>2713017
Olympian and Chicago are two good cold-hardy fig varieties

>WV
howdy neighbor
>>
>>2713017
>>2713062
>how well figs work as an herbaceous perennial
Decently well, that's how they are sometimes grown here in zone 6, they die down all the way to whatever insulation is used to cover them (if any) unless winter was really mild, in Spring you only have a woody stump left they regrow from, so you lose breba crop, you would want cultivars that fruit better on current year's wood and ripen fast for this kind of growing, "brown turkey" is popular here.
Sometimes people wrap insulation around them to keep above ground part alive but that's a lot of labor and still might fail if winter is really cold.
And there is the pot method but you need to keep it wet and have someplace to keep them.
I recommend this book, "Growing Figs in Cold Climates: A Complete Guide"
https://www.libgen.is/book/index.php?md5=F58EE2570AD0079BD1F214D6725F7A46
>>
>>2713050
Google says compost has a bulk density of 420 - 655 kg/m^3 so probably somewhere between 38.2 and 59.5 liters
>>
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Nice list
>>
just bought carrot seeds, never tried my hand in agriculture so i dont know what i am doing, also from mn (minnesota) and its snowing really hard right now so I can't do much now.
>>
Cheers lads
I've got a question: I've been reading up on the topic about how soils are becoming more and more depleted in terms of micronutrients to the point that despite vegetables either keeping the same size or even increasing, the micronutrient composition has actually reduced.
The thing is, I've been using some really old soil (about 30 years old) which I've ocasionally topped up with compost, and various types of manure (chicken and horse), aswell as some soil from the market.
The fact of the matter is that my soil does keep producing produce, but now I'm wondering if that produce is as micronutrient rich as it could be.
So this leads to my question: what can I do to improve the micronutrient profile of my soil, especially in the trace mineral department
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>>2713258
Unless you run a large scale industrial farm it's a non-issue.
>>
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New growfag here, can someone tell me why a couple of my marigold seedlings leaves decided to point straight up press together? Is it like too much heat? Too much/close light? My third marigold in the same environment looks normal, for what it's worth.

Google is too retarded to answer this. All I get is a bunch of useless shit about cannabis praying.
>>
>>2713258
Commercially grown vegetables are grown for their storage qualities, yield and how well they travel, they aren't grown for their nutritional value. Vegetables being less nutritious now has
nothing to do with the soil. This is literally a schizo theory everyone has decided to believe without thinking about it for two seconds.
>>
>>2713272
Don't worry about it, they'll be fine.
>>
>>2713212
You could start seedlings like tomatoes indoors in front of a bright window for later planting in ground

>>2713258
iirc it's constant tillage on industrial farms causing organic content from soil to be washed away during heavy rain also leaving it bare overwinter degrades it, that is bad but I doubt it affects mirconutrient content of veggies because modern fertilizers include even shit like molybdenum and magnesium.

>>2713272
It should be fine, you don't need to fuss over it.
>>
>>2713272
Seeds know what they're doing. This isn't like baking, you gotta be a little hands off and let nature do it's thing
>>
>>2713272
>Too much/close light
Impossible In my experience.
>>
>>2710594
What is bwh and csa?
>>
>>2713258
Compost has plenty of micronutrients in it, so your soil should be fine. If you're worried about it get a lab soil test done.
>>
>>2713258
You're really not going to do better than horse shit. The biggest vegetables ever grown were done with the aid of horse poo.
>>
>>2713285
>storage qualities, yield and how well they travel
Perfectly explains why 99% of store bought strawberries are absolute garbage
>>
>I'll fertilize and clean up my fruit plants, should take one afternoon
>Realize just how many fruit plants I have after starting
I keep forgetting just how many things I have planted over years, it'll probably take Friday and Saturday before I'm done
>>
>>2713344
Supermarket plums suffer the worst imo, they're absolutely disgusting and might as well be a different fruit altogether, cherries are bad too. In the UK strawberries and raspberries are pretty good when they're in season because there are farms everywhere and they don't have to travel far. The only out of season fruit I buy these days are grapes.
>>
>>2713385
>Supermarket plums suffer the worst imo
I don't think I've ever tasted supermarket tomatoes that would have any sort of taste.
The small cherry tomatoes are but better but still nowhere as good as from garden.
Strawberries are usually actually good.
Just buy the local ones instead of some spain import.
Plums I'm not too sure, I usually don't buy them.
>>
>>2713285
>This is literally a schizo theory
>stop noticing!
>>
>plant a bunch of flowers
>some start blooming almost immediately
Could this mean they're preparing for death? I know some plants will try to pollinate like crazy before dying, I think they might be getting too much sun but I also replaced a lot of dirt with ~20 year old compost so maybe they're just happy.
>>
>>2713423
What flowers? And what do you mean by immediately? If they're bolting they are probably underdeveloped and won't look happy which you would probably have found out yourself.
>>
>>2713272
Just stretching out bro, let it be.
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Me and those CrawDads ripping in the garden today.
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>>2713444
Wasp bro standing guard.
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>>2713407
Noticing what? I'm not disputing that commercial vegetables are less nutritious or that bad farming practices ruin soil. What I am disputing is that supposedly "depleted" soil produces less nutritious vegetables. If you grow a commercial variety in your organic garden it isn't going to be any more nutritious than when it's grown on a big farm.
>>
>>2713455
False.
>>
are soil block starters a meme?
the only thing i heard bad about them is that they arent really good for seeds that have a long germination time.
wondering in anyone here has expierence with them.
>>
>>2713467
I imagine they're great if you're doing hundreds of seedlings and don't want to manage or fuck around with trays. Wait for them to sprout, and just plunk them in the ground.
>>
>>2713467
>>2713490
You will find opinions on every side, some people love them some hate them. I hate them. Just not worth it imo and at the end of the day you still have to have a plastic tray to put the fucking things in. So just by a cell tray, better yet use Winstrip trays and have the best of both worlds.
>>
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>>2713467
I recommend these if you can find them cheap, or don’t mind spending $15. I lucked upon them at a deep discount and hope they last me many years. They’re compact, use little soil, come with a tray underneath to catch any drippings, and the seedlings pop out effortlessly. They were perfect for me to use indoors beneath grow lights to get my garden started in time for early spring. Soil blocking is a bad idea (for me) because my needs are for inside my house and I need as little mess as possible.
>>
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anybody know what kind of fruit tree this is?
I thought it was a variety of lychee at first but inside it's yellow fleshed with multiple small seeds, and it's fruiting in autumn in a colder climate than lychee would
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>>2713540
interior of the fruit
>>
>>2713457
Any reasoning of did you just hear it from some fag on youtube? Start growing yourself and you'll find how many gardening tips and how much internet wisdom on gardening is old wives tales.
>>
>>2713540
>>2713541
Kousa Dogwood, edible
>>
What to do with 10 dozen quail eggs? I'm thinking pickling. Any good recipes?
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>>2713557
Forgot picture..
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>>2713549
Thanks anon
have a frog in the strawberry patch
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I can fix her
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>>2713557
Pickle them and use them to make mini-Scotch eggs
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Fresh scan for any based Midwestern prairie people:

https://archive.org/details/prairie-propagation-handbook/
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>>2713544
Ok, sure.
>>
Kinda looks like a penis.
>>
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i've come to guess that the best way to improve my soil is to not even try and just put compost and mulch on top and grow stuff in it instead
moraine is the stuff i deal with
lots of rocks and some thick ass clay
>>
>>2713653
You need to do both to improve your soil. Grow some alfalfa and radishes inoculated with nitrogen fixing bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi to fix nitrogen and biodrill the soil, which opens up various sizes of pores. After your harvest spread compost and your alfalfa as a mulch. You can leave the radishes in the ground to rot, compost them, or bury them under the mulch. Using compost amended with biochar, or directly amending your soil with charged biochar, will improve your soil faster than compost alone. You're going to have to go through your field every year or two to move rocks out
>>
>>2713635
pollin is stored in the stamen
>>2713653
carrots, radishes, rutabagas, parsnips, turnips, beets, yams, dandelions, burdock.
things with strong taproots. to breakup the soil.
>>
>>2713653
If you have heavy soil prone to anaerobic conditions (if you dig into soil and get bad, rotting smell you know you have it) something like broadfork can work wonders
>>
>>2713661
>>2713659
have you ever dealth with moraine before?
ive spent the last three years digging out a good 80m2 area where i grow some stuff
the soil is wet until late may and then dry-ish until september and then its wet again
i mean saturated. water table is literally 5cm below the grass for 3/4th of the year
currently there is water between my furrows
ive grown potatoes, but after winter the soil is solid as a rock again
i have no idea what to do about it other than abandon the native soil and create new and raised land from compost and grass cutting
biochar is something i will try to make and add to my compost this year though
>>2713663
i dont think its particularly anaerobic, but i will gice this a try anyway, thanks
>>
>>2713666
perhaps orchardist or arborist ?
are there any native trees in the area?
native species of plants?
or are you trying to terraform the wasteland?
instead of dryland farming maybe you need to do rice patty farming, or marsh/swamp farming. or maybe you need fjord farming. tundra farming?
>>
Need advice.
Are 3inch tomato seedlings considered leggy? They have first pair of true leaves.
Im planning on transplanting them from starting tray to some pots somewhat soon for limited outside exposure, there are 3 seedlings per cell, should I thin them out or keep them in threes?
Also, if they ARE leggy, should I bury them deeper when transplanting or do tomatoes not like such things?
They are a cocktail tomato type with bushy form if that helps any, not sure what cultivar.
>>
>>2713672
native trees are pine, fir, birch, aspen, maple
moss and grass, some onion flowers and other wild flowers, dandelions in droves
i want to be able to grow wine, asparagus, potatoes, garlic, and other regular things
>>
>>2713666
>have you ever dealth with moraine before?
I've grown in similar clayey, rocky soils. It is not easy.

>i mean saturated. water table is literally 5cm below the grass for 3/4th of the year
currently there is water between my furrows
You'll probably need to install some kind of drainage or infiltration basin until you can improve the tilth of your soil. You can makes several small drain holes in your field with an auger and fill them with biochar, wood chips, or gravel. That way they can help to water your plants too.
>>
>>2713675
>Are 3inch tomato seedlings considered leggy? They have first pair of true leaves.
Sounds leggy.

>there are 3 seedlings per cell, should I thin them out
I never do, but some people swear by it.

>should I bury them deeper when transplanting
Yes.
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>>2713675
>Are 3inch tomato seedlings considered leggy?
Look at those tomatoes, can you see how they all have different size despite being kept in nearly identical conditions?
None of those are leggy, they are different because they are different cultivars, smallest are small even for dwarf cultivar, medium are semi-determinate and largest are indeterminate.
Point is, it's hard to tell without a photo if seedling is leggy.

>should I thin them out or keep them in threes?
You can but you can also wait, you could also separate them into different cells to have more seedlings.

>Also, if they ARE leggy, should I bury them deeper when transplanting or do tomatoes not like such things?
You can do that, tomatoes will grow roots from stem, in fact if you damage root system when transplanting I would recommend planting deeper.
>>
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What is this shit and how do I remove it?
>>
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>Garden Renovation! We Turned Crazy Jungle Into Beautiful Garden!!
>*removes all vegetation, buildings, and fixtures, leaving only an empty and useless green floor*
Why are they like this?
>>
>>2713682
>>2713683
Thanks for intel on thinning and burring.
They seemed kinda leggy to me, noticeably thinner and pretty much as tall as few in that pic, so I wanted to have confirmation.
They are probably a bit crowded(72 seedlings on 5inX12in) and sun situation could be better(east-ish windowsill), but after transplant both aspects should improve.
>>
>>2713693
I saw few minutes of this show(or something similar) and I just couldn't take it.
It felt like Xzibit pimp my ride parody
You like colour?
Well guess what buddy we painted all your wooden furniture bright purple!
We also added some plastic drapes with ugly flower motive since you like flowers right?
>>
>>2713680
if you want to grow wine. learn to graft.
they often take rootstock from hardy plants and graft vines onto them.
i think they use pear and apple rootstock to graft grape vines i could be wrong about that though.
asparigus i heard is finiky in general to establish and takes a while.
there should be cultivars of tubers suited to your soil.
unless you plant whats regular to the biome then youre better off container gardening .
learn to work with the land not against it. .unless youre like really into civil engineering.
>>
>>2713680
I'm going to grow potatoes in 15 gallon grow bags this year, got a 36-pack of them for like 60 bucks
>>
>>2713680
>high water table
>grapevine
>asparagus
Not gonna happen my dude, both of those don't like standing in water, they'll rot in the ground, you would probably need to build a mound for them to survive.

Disregard that other guy too, you don't need to graft grapevines unless you are some sort of commercial grower, I have no idea why people keep forcing commercial growing practices onto people who just plant a thing or two in their backyard.
>>
>>2713714
vernalization is an important skill.
>>
>>2713716
If you are a professional or passionate about growing stuff then sure but if you just want to plant some stuff around your yard and watch it grow it's not.
Average gardener will just pay a few more bucks for stuff already grafted by a nursery so he never needs to learn how to do it.
>>
>muh taproot
Is it really that bad to disturb plants that have tap roots? I thought taproots are for stability and water intake so how would transplanting cause stunted growth?
>>
>>2713753
The biggest issue is the shock - if you've got a plant with a 4+ foot deep taproot and you only get the top foot or two, the plant is immediately going into survival mode. You can cut back most of the vegitative growth to balance out the damaged root system, but you'll need to nurse the plant back to health over a few months - if you do this in the summer that might mean daily watering. In the fall or spring you can get away with it more easily, but the impact of the shock and other factors, like the age of the original plant could affect its growth in the new site
>>
>>2713068

Howdy to you too. Watcha growin'?
>>
Speaking of tap roots. Anyone have experience removing mesquite trees? Do I need to remove the entire tap root or can I just dig down a foot or two and remove the root bulb to effectively kill it?
>>
>>2713688
Pls help
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>>2713755
Gotcha but i was more talking about seedlings. Everywhere you read that sunflowers for example supposedly dont transplant well due to their precious tap root which I suspect is another gardening myth.
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>>2713839
Yeah, fake news. Seedlings usually don't give a shit, just keep them in moist dirt in a milkjug or tray and you can move, divide, transplant them with no problem for the first few weeks. It's easy to pull them straight out of soil with the entire taproot intact
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>>2713797
Could. But honestly why would you? They're nutrition, good cooking wood. And basically the only nitrogen fixing plants in the desert.
>>
Raspberryniggers, do raspberry plants grow new plants out of extending roots? I'm trying to convince my folks that the crop that's emerged right next to my kiwi gold that has the exact same type of leaves is a fledgling raspberry sucker and not some wild cultivar
>>
>>2713863
Yeah the rhizome sends up new shoots
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>>2713863
>do raspberry plants grow new plants out of extending roots
Yep. Got a patch now that started as a few plants. I tear them up regularly to keep it manageable. Usually the new shoots close by are all connected to the same exact root too, looks funky.
>>
One more week and if the two week forecast looms mild I'm going to start planting my babby plants, bros. Been a real mild winter here in 7b, but we might get down in the high 30s a night or two this week. Typical last frost forecast is early to mid April.

I started my peppers the last week of January and some of them are huge.
>>
>>2713863

Yeah, raspberries go crazy in just a few years. I forgot to mow mine to the ground last year and they're leafing out and new ones are emerging everywhere
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>>2713863
Yes, you'll eventually grow to hate them when you have to rip them out for 588th time
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I just fund a new addition to my collection while fertilizing gooseberries, I even have a good spot to plant it later on
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>>2713549
>edible
Are you sure? My dad and now I have a kousa and the fruits smell like shit.
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>>2713980
I didn't say they were tasty lol. Edible more in the sense that it won't kill you if you eat it
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Getting a new gazebo, so I'm planning to turn the old one into a greenhouse. It is 10x12 and the side members are 2 pieces, so I have the option of shrinking it in half to 5x12, or to quarter size of 5x6 (leaning toward that size). All I need to do is drill a few holes an install threaded rivnuts because the 2 piece side members taper towards the middle.

I might also add rivnuts to the side of the legs as attachment points for diy shelving. Or maybe put the extra side members at the mid point of the legs for extra rigidity and add a lifting point.

Got that gazebo cheap at an end of season clearance. After several seasons the cover is trashed and the replacement is very expensive.
>>
>>2714058
Is the floor real wood or WPC?
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>>2714163
Yeah its real wood. Composite gets ridiculously hot in the summer, and you'll kill yourself trying to walk on it after a snow.

We re-decked the surface 6 years ago, and replaced the rotted wood railing with the metal one. The wood shrunk a surprising amount after putting it down so the gaps between boards are bigger than we'd like.

I restained the deck last spring and learned that oil stain appears to be getting phased out. I used water based stain the previous two times. It worked amazingly the first time, and awful the second time. Despite extensive surface prep the residual water based stain prevented the new coat from being absorbed. Water based stain is a pain in the ass to apply. You have to do it when it is cool and no direct sun. You get one shot to hit a board. If you accidentally lightly swipe another board as soon as that thin film flashes off, it is water proof and won't accept any more stain.

The first time I applied the water based stain the deck stayed completely water proof for 2 years straight beading the water. I'd have to squeegee it after a rain.
>>
Could ordinary wire fence support the weight of one of those cold hardy small kiwi vines?
Looks like it's fairly vigorous plant.
>>
>>2713688
>>2713799
The pic quality is dicks, so don't expect many answers. Grab a real camera, not a phone, and do a good photo.
This distorted by a built-in and completely uncontrollable by the end user beautifying in intent but damaging in reality hardware-software component of current pseudo-smart phones 'photo' could picture a genocided colony of mealybugs as well as splattered bird's shit. Something tampered with denoising the data from camera sensor and turned all details into complete blur. Notice that you can't even see the scales on the bud, that should be clearly distinguishable at this magnification.
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>>2713839
I did transplant some plants that had a long main root going downwards, and my main observation is that the root generates smaller ones going sideways, and does so all along the main root as deep as I could dig.
So the real problem with transplanting something with 1m deep main root is that you're likely to cut most of the root mass, for you usually don't have an option to dig deep enough.

For instance, some rose seedlings, no older than two years, managed to go about 40 cm deep. I grafted some pears on hawthorn, dug hawthorn seedlings from a nearby meadow, and I didn't manage to dig entire root of plants that are barely thick enough for grafting. And I put those in 2l bottles with top severed, for most pots are just too shallow for the roots.
>>
>>2713688
Full blown plant AIDS. You need to kill it before it spreads
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>>2714385
Probably. It will depend on how well the fence is supported, but if it will hold your weight then you should be good. Make sure the fence is tall enough it.
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>>2714058
Took the lights off the gazebo and took it apart. Threw the roof parts in a different pile, some of them may be useful. I think going to 1/4 size would be the best option, that way I can have one side member top and bottom all the way around which will make it less wobbly and easier to add plastic. I'll need to add 12 rivet nuts for that arrangement, a local hardware store has a rivet nut kit on sale for $30.
>>
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>snowing again this week
i can't fucking take it anymore bros
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>>2714518
We got 15 cm of snow a few days ago, -19C Friday night, then it is supposed to be +20C on Wednesday.
>>
Another question about seedlings. I keep reading that if it's too warm seedlings get leggy and that even ones that need warmth to germinate prefer cooler temperatures for optimal growing. Is that true? I thougtht leggyness was caused by light deficiency.
>>
>>2714604
It usually is but if they are too hot they'll increase their surface area to get better transpiration to be able to get rid of heat better and it does look similar to light deficiency.
Check temperatures they like after germination (it's usually significantly lower) and try to not go above that
>>
>>2714518
I had a quick 1 day frost exactly the same night all my apricots flowered.
I didn't expect anything less at this point.
I don't know why plants can't wait a week, when this shit happens every year.
>>
>He didn't plant late blooming, frost resistant apricots
Skill issue
>>
I feel stupid but like what is a greenhouse actually good for? Like, would tomatoes or something be better off covered and warm?

I'm starting seeds inside the first time this year, but so far my gardening plan has been to plant seeds and watch em grow. No problems thus far
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>>2714684
https://www.shelterlogic.com/knowledge/5-major-benefits-of-a-greenhouse
>>
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Re-planted a relative's plot, put up a trellis (gonna add another field and climber later). Cheeky minature stone-garden in the corner with Saxifraga, Sedum and Tectorum in the corner
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>>2714713
Looks nice. Did you grow them yourself or buy them from a nursery?
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>>2714713
the branches of that willow will eventually reach all the way to the ground and smother out whatever's groing underneath it and take up half of that flowerbed
t. had one
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>>2714506
The gazebo resizing was surprisingly fast / easy. I totally miss counted the number of inserts I needed, 16 for the lowers and 4 for the upper. I think the easier way to attach plastic will be to attach furring strips to the frame using smaller threaded inserts and bolts, then staple directly to the wood. I should be able to make a door that way too.
>>
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Can anyone tell me what's going on with my basil? This has happened to all my sweet basil and lemon basil
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>>2714735
Just a bunch of measuring, drilling and riveting. And the occasional pause the double check I wasn't making the wrong choice between narrow and wide hole spacing.
>>
Anyone know how close you can plant spinach to bell peppers? Was reading something about them not sharing root space, since bell peppers have deep roots and spinach has shallow roots, so they don't conflict and the spinach takes up space that weeds would use.

Anyone got any experience fucking around with this?
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>>2714735
You did the calculations of the force exerted by the wind, didn't you?
One of the most unwelcome sight is that of one's flying shack/garage/greenhouse.
So, remember to anchor it right, and if the original arches are too flimsy, add some diagonal beams.
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>>2714735
>I think the easier way to attach plastic
The "easy" way are these, then there go simple drill through holes and bolts+nut, rivet nuts are much much more sophisticated.
Wooden frame/furring strips require much more maintenance, for you need to preserve the wood regularly.
Also keep in mind that you want to have an option for ventilating the greenhouse when it's too hot outdoors, and way too hot inside a greenhouse. So think of an option to open the door and some part of the roof.
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>>2714737
looks fungal, or some bug bit it and spread fungal.
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>>2714785
not the guy, but I had that happen to my greenhouse multiple times, even though it was anchored by the side walls in addition to the original anchors on the 4 corners.
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>>2710301
When I get my own property I want to have clover lawn pathways and maybe some stepping stones.
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>>2714737
black dots
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>>2714518
laughs in cold stratifying seeds outside
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What are the pros and cons of buying a fruit plant VS growing it from seed? Not really a tree but more so shrubs like blackberries and such
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My pear treelet decided to flower.
It's been grafted badly two years ago on some random hawthorn, had pear rust hinder its growth, and is no taller than my erect dick.
Do the flowers indicate imminent death, serious stress or is it just that this treelet considers itself mature?
Did anyone have some experience with juvenile trees going into bloom?
>>
>>2715025
It's not guaranteed to be like the fruit it came from. Could be really unsweet, sour, just bad flavor. You can get blackberry bare roots of a guaranteed variety for cheap online. Some also tend to have clumping habits so you aren't fighting new shoots where you don't want them, thornless, primocane fruiting etc.
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>>2715025
3-5 years and variability in the habit and fruit.
>>
>>2715078
>>2715084
The time it would take is what I really don't like. I don't mind the taste or invasiveness because I have a big patch of shit soil and having something edible there is just a plus. I've been mainly looking at sea buckthorn but it's hard to source those aside for their seeds. I think I might bite the bullet and just order a few grown plants in the mail.
>>
>>2715086
Once you have something you like you can propagate it from suckers and cuttings relatively easily

>shit soil
>edible
Autumn olive and Goumi berry are also good, especially in partial shade

>sea buckthorn
Remember you need both male and female plants to set fruit, usually ratio of 6 female to 1 male is used
Keep in mind it's thorny af once it gets older
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>>2715100
Yeah the male and female ratio of sea buckthorn is also making me not want to bother growing from seed. I'll spend half a decade waiting and end up having half of the plants be useless anyways.

Autumn olive grows like a weed here so I'm thinking of just digging up a few small ones from the woods.
>>
>>2714735
I'm thinking about roof options. Using 1/2" PVC pipe would be the least amount of work to construct the frame, but cover a dome in plastic could be tricky. My idea is one piece on each diagonal and an extra side to side for stability. A U bolt could lock the crossing point together but it would be a bit of a mess with 3 crossing pipes. There are 6 way PVC tees for making geodesic domes, maybe I should just order one of those and not have any crossing pipes.

There are already 4 corner tabs I can bolt into, and I have extra tab brackets I can add to the sides. I think rather than drilling through the plastic and risk it cracking at the bolt, I'd get some solid hardwood dowel that I could slide the tubing over.

If I were to do a peaked or lean-to roof the covering would be all flat pieces but I'd have triangular sides to deal with.
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>>2715113
>roof options

Much depends on the tools you own. Do you have a welder?
Do you consider buying structural steel, or do you have some leftovers from shrinking the gazebo?
Can you bend metal rods to insert them from the top of the vertical profiles of the greenhouse?

Flat roof is not a good option, for leaves&dirt that falls on top won't be flushed down during a rain, and it's rarely flat enough not to leave dirty puddles.

You can go with foil for the triangular sides of a pyramid-shape roof, which would be an easy solution.

You can make a gable roof or shed roof, as pic related. Fastening the top surface plastic to a frame and using a hinge will let you open the roof on heat strikes. It's easy to reuse some fasteners from some old roof window to this end. Triangular sides for these roofs can be done by cutting rectangular plastic pieces diagonally, so it's not that big issue.
>>
So I've been trying to learn about growing mushrooms in more lazy low-maintenance ways, treating the colonies like a perennial and I know that like with shiitakes you can inoculate logs with the spores to create a colony, and some other species you can grow pretty well under woodchips or in mulch, and recently I've been learning about truffles grow in the roots of certain species of trees and when you're planting trees you can inoculate them with truffle spores and hope the colony establishes.

This method of growing truffles in combination with trees has fascinated me and I've been wondering if there are other species of rare mushrooms people have tried growing in similar ways, since identifying the types of trees that are common hosts for fungi species is a pretty important part of learning to forage for mushrooms.
In particular I'm curious about trying to inoculate some pines, elms, ash, poplar or other common morel trees with spores as they grow up and see if I could get some consistent harvests from that over the years.

Honestly clueless here, it's just a wild idea I had during breakfast today, I don't need a great success rate as long as it works even a little bit, cause I'm planning to plant a lot of trees anyway and I'll enjoy just having the trees, symbiotic mushrooms or not.
I just think it would be cool as hell to intentionally colonize the woods on my property with local mushroom species the way they grow in nature.
>>
>>2715124
I tired to inoculate edible mushrooms two years ago by sprinkling mycelium around and digging small vertical holes and dropping it there but I haven't seen any (edible) mushrooms yet.
I'm starting to think trees get inoculated with whatever is already around in soil early on and trying to add it later won't really do anything.
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>>2715168
>I'm starting to think trees get inoculated with whatever is already around in soil early on and trying to add it later won't really do anything.
Yeah I'm hoping to grow a lot of trees from their younger stages and plant/transplant them into my property which mostly has a lot of open, unused land on it, so I'm thinking if I CAN get them started early right when the trees are like, getting potted in the nursery stage and going into the ground I can try to make sure they get spores around them
>>
Would anyone kindly show me how to transition from mulch bed to lawn

Last year I sort of threw together some mulch and whatever plants I found cheap. Had to get rid of 100 5 gal buckets worth of rocks around my perimeter and covered the bare area with mulch.

But now I notice some spots where the grass sits lower than the mulch bed and looks like shit. What do? How do laborers make these look nice?
>>
>>2710623
It’s still weeks away anon is just a dumbass
>>
>>2714790
I feel like you're right.
The plant is looking way worse now. It seems to happen after it rains. I may give up on growing basil outdoors for now.
>>
>>2714781
You should be able to plant them right next to each other.
>>
>>2715124
You want to look into mycorrhizal mushrooms like truffles and chanterelles.

>>2715168
>>2715228
You want to use a spore slurry. Throw your mushrooms in a 5 gallon bucket of water with a bit of salt and let it sit overnight, shaking occasionally. Pour the entire bucket over the roots of a suitable species of tree and repeat often. You should see mushrooms after 5-10 years.
>>
>>2715277
Basil needs really well draining soil. That could be the source of your issues.
>>
>>2710237
Hey anons, yesterday i cropped my mullberry tree and i have load of good quality cuttings. How do i propagate them? Put them straight to the ground, use willow water or do i have to buy a footing hormone?
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>>2715394
I used to do those fancy methods but now I just stick them into one place in my garden with good soil that stays moist, in partial shade and usually about half of them roots.
It depends a lot on cultivar with mulberries tho, some root easily while some are really hard to propagate.

>yesterday
Bad, should have put them into soil or water right away I hope you are at least storing them in dark, cool place.
>>
>>2715049
> and is no taller than my erect dick.
Kek.
Take the Bonsai-pill, anon!
(Applies to both. Your tree and your dick, I assume the latter is cut anyways)
Fuck, I really want to get my new garden going, but a) it’s still too early to put stuff outside where I’m at, late frosts are just waiting for me and b) I really need to get the house into livable condition first. Oh well. My seedling shall stay on my rentoid windowsill a bit longer.
>>
So I transplanted a little watermelon plant from a plastic cup to the ground. While it was in the cup, it developed several roots that went straight vertical. I think that's neat, should help it dig down further for nutrients when in the ground, right? As opposed to roots that are shallow and near the surface.
>>
Has anyone used a #10 can sealer?
The machine is expensive - as are the cans (~$3 each), but the savings of ordering and sealing bulk supplies over the commercial equivalent is remarkable.
>>
>>2715472
Why not use mason jars? They're reusable and will probably be cheaper for you
>>
>>2715462
Yep. Deep rooted plants can also bring up nutrients from deeper in the soil profile and make them accessible to plants with shallower roots.
>>
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Shit... gonna be a lot of up potting
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>>2715086
Aronia berry grows pretty well on poor soils in my experience.
It also doesn't grow very tall and doesn't expand much.
It has strong, distinct taste, can't really compare it to anything, most people don't eat it raw but I enjoy it a lot.
It's somewhat popular here in central Europe but I never heard of anyone growing it in US so it might be hard to get there.
If you live somewhere with stronger sun and higher temperatures it might not do so well, I'm in zone 6 but it's really frost resistant, down to zone 3 according to google.
It's about to start flowering here, pic related.
>>
>>2715501
Some people make hedges out of these
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>>2715501
Aronia/chokeberry is actually an eastern North American native species, it's just not terribly popular over here in the US. No idea about availability of seeds/sapling.
>>
>>2715502
Good choice, It has pretty attractive foliage and is easy to maintain plus almost no pests

>>2715510
I know.
Here it's sold in almost every nursery with good choice of cultivars and every other garden with edible stuff has one or more.
Majority of people here know how it tastes too, you'll find a ton of cooking recipes for juice, jam, alcohol, cake and so on with aronia berries if you look in the local internet.
Meanwhile Americans don't know what it is and even if they do, they most likely have never tasted or grown it.

It's bizarre.
Like, imagine if paw paw trees and fruits were really popular in Europe while barely anyone heard about them in US, it's pretty much like this with aronia.
>>
Last year I made a poly tunnel to keep my peppers warm early in the season. I'm going to try using it this spring to warm the soil and get an earlier start on a few things. As soon as the ground dries a bit I'll plant my carrots 2-3 weeks earlier than usual. Early May I'll plant some beans and put the cover over them.
>>
>>2715497
How do you make your soil blocks? Are you just shaping and separating them with those tags?
>>
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>>2715529
The mini blocks are 4 scoops sifted peat, 4 scoops sifted black kow and 1/2 scoop of vermiculite.
The big blocks are are the same just upscaled. In the beginning we just the tags like this (photo) in old styrofoam trays until we build out then slip them between the blocks. Shortly we will move to plant tags
>>
>>2715531
You should try using coconut coir instead of peat and biochar instead of vermiculite. How are you forming the blocks? Do you use a soil blocker or do you have some technique that you use?
>>
>>2715529
>>2715531
edit: black kow is just bagged cow manure compost
>>
>>2715258
I cut a small v-shaped trench between the grass and mulch, like 4 inches wide and deep. If the grass is lower then the mulch though that might be odd, maybe try a rock border
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>>2715533
we have tried coconut coir but it doesn't hold together as well. As for biochar, we could probably make that here but easier to get 4 cu feet of vermiculite and have it last a few years
>>
>>2715533
at some point we're going to oder a bag of Vermont Compost Fort Vee and see how that works earlier in the season when I don't feel like sifting in the garage.
>>
>>2715474
I'm thinking it could pay off long term as well as be a fun toy. I have a family of 6 and just now priced a 'survival can' of powdered eggs at $100, but you can buy powdered eggs in bulk for $10/lb (the can had 2lbs)
I figure I could also lend it out and use it for non food items like ammo.
>>
>>2715542
Sure, but for $1,500 you could get like 100 packs of mason jars each with 8-12 jars depending on what sizes you choose and the mason jars are easier to seal and unseal. You can put ammo in them too, but an ammo box would probably be better
>>
>>2715537
>As for biochar, we could probably make that here but easier to get 4 cu feet of vermiculite and have it last a few years
You could get a bag of lump charcoal and crush it to the proper grade.

How are you forming the blocks? Do you use a soil blocker or do you have some technique that you use?
>>
>>2715546
>1,200 mason jars
>or a new toy
It's a solid view. I have about 5 packs of vacuum sealed mason jars filled with rice and beans and lentils. That's been nice to have, but
I wouldn't mind having a year or two of decent frozen food in the basement 'just in case' for the next 20-30 years.
Equally I wouldn't mind gifting that same ration to my in-laws or kids when they move out of the house.
Light can get to the mason jars, otherwise I expect they'll be good for a decade to come.
I look at them and realize sealed cans would be a nice upgrade and I could expand what I store, how long I can store it, how I treat them, and the packaging would be more condensed.
It would certainly be a luxury, not a necessity.
I guess I'm trying to justify the cost. Going back to my prior post about the powdered eggs
>$100 #10 can with an 'emergency ration' sticker
>I could make them for $23
At 20 cans I break even doing it myself.
There's a $800 version that does #2 and #3 cans that'd be more rational in serving size, but I obviously like to over do things.
I had an urge a few years ago but talked myself out of it. I still look at them and think
>man, that'd be cool to have
>>
>>2715547
oh sorry, yea we use ladbrook soil blockers
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>>2715557
Nice. I was hoping you had some trick for making neat blocks without a blocker. I might have to think about getting one.
>>
>>2715552
Light shouldn't be too much of a problem if they're stored properly. If you just want the canner then go for it, but I'd go with the most economical option in that case and get the #2 #3 canner.
>>
>>2715603
I pulled the trigger on a #2.5 can sealer for $100 on ebay.
We'll see how it goes. If that goes well I'll keep an eye out for a #10 canner.
Mason jars are $1.30 and #2.5 cans I see around $1.70
1 time use, but they can be abused
>>
>>2715617
Sounds worth the trade off. Especially when you consider that the mason jar lids have to be replaced every so often.
>>
>>2715629
Yea, mason jars are sold separately.
At least cans offer some flexibility if you toss them in a car or bump them in storage.
I process a little garden surplus each year, so I can also play around with the difference with cans vs jars.
I'll do my best to report back in a few weeks if I can get the sealer up and running and do some tests.
>>
>>2715637
>mason jars are sold separately
*lids sold separately
A $100 barrier to entry isn't too radical if mason jars and cans are priced accordingly (although I'm sure there's a huge markup on both products)
The durability and disposability of cans is alluring. I think that was my underlying point while trying to navigate the $1,XXX barrier. If it works out and I can scale up, all the better.
If not, back to mason jars.
>>
>>2715637
>>2715638
Yeah, I think you made the right call with the cheaper one. Maybe try to find a sale or secondhand listing for a bigger one if you decide it's worth it.
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>>2715601
They last forever, I think we got our first blocker in 2015, just clean it and dry it off after use.
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>>2715601
I built two soil blockers with wood to test it this year. One produces blocks around 2in long, almost 1in squared area on top, the other 2.5 in square area with a hole the size of the first block, 4-5 in deep.
My plants seem happy for now, I just moved some peppers to the big blocks.
>>
>>2716027
> I built two soil blockers with wood to test it this year.
Neat. Did you follow any guide or something or did you just eyeball it?
>>
I'm growing in SIPs filled at the bottom with perlite and then with fresh cheap gardening/potting soil in them and a bit of compost.
Before transplanting my plants this year, I planned on mixing the soil around a bit, adding in a bit of slow release fertilizer and topping them off with vermicompost/worm castings (of which I have like 30 liters or so).
Does that sound reasonable? Am I missing something obvious?
>>
>>2716250
It sounds good to me. The worm castings are an especially good add. Did you use any in your seeding mix? It can help quite a bit with germination. You might have over fertilized, but you'll find out. If you did and your plants do poorly mix in uncharged biochar or wood chips to try to soak up the excess nutrients. Maybe inoculate it with mycorrhizal fungi too. The next time you make a bed like that consider using biochar or lump charcoal crushed to the appropriate grade for your drainage at the bottom.
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>>2716286
>It sounds good to me. The worm castings are an especially good add.
Yeah I got into vermiculture about a year ago because I was tired of buying fishing bait and the store running out all the time, and as a nice side effect I now have 1 year worth of vermicompost&castings.
>Did you use any in your seeding mix? It can help quite a bit with germination.
I did, about 2/3rds of container soil and 1/3rd vermicompost. Seemed to have worked really well.
>You might have over fertilized, but you'll find out. If you did and your plants do poorly mix in uncharged biochar or wood chips to try to soak up the excess nutrients. Maybe inoculate it with mycorrhizal fungi too.
Is uncharged bio har just charcoal? I was under the impression that bio har was just charcoal that got charged by adding plant matter, water and amendments to get the microbial life going.
>The next time you make a bed like that consider using biochar or lump charcoal crushed to the appropriate grade for your drainage at the bottom.
In retrospect, that's what I should have done - would have been cheaper and easier to get than perlite too. But the SIPs are still performing amazingly well so far, so no need to redo them all over again it seems.

I didn't actually do the soil amendment so far, would you say it's better to leave the fertilizer out as the vermicompost probably has plenty of nutrients and then add it later as the plants grow?
Thanks for the help already.
>>
Are currants worth it? What's the flavor profile like between varieties?
>>
>>2716338
Black are more sweet, red are sour, white are fairly neutral tasting
>>
>>2716317
>Yeah I got into vermiculture about a year ago because I was tired of buying fishing bait and the store running out all the time, and as a nice side effect I now have 1 year worth of vermicompost&castings.
Nice. I love vermicomposting and so do my chickens.

>Seemed to have worked really well.
Glad to hear it.

>Is uncharged bio har just charcoal? I was under the impression that bio har was just charcoal that got charged by adding plant matter, water and amendments to get the microbial life going.
Pretty much. The terminology is pretty flexible. I specify biochar so that you're not thinking charcoal briquettes which won't work. You want to buy lump charcoal if you can't make it or can't find uncharged biochar.

>In retrospect, that's what I should have done
Hindsight is 20/20. I don't worry about charging the charcoal if I'm just using it for drainage. The nutrients that leech out charge it over time and I end up losing less of them.

>I didn't actually do the soil amendment so far, would you say it's better to leave the fertilizer out as the vermicompost probably has plenty of nutrients and then add it later as the plants grow?
It depends on the soil mix you got. It should have everything you need already and the vermicompost should help. Only around 10% of the nutrients from the vermicompost will be available in the first year, so you don't need to worry about that part. You can always side dress your crops with more fertilizer later if you don't think they're doing well enough, but unless you're planting some heavy feeders like corn or kale then you should be good to go.

>Thanks for the help already.
No problem. I like being able to share advice and learning how other people work their garden.
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>>2716338
Yeah, worth it imo, really nice taste.
Red is more tart, black is kind of hard to describe, I guess kind of grapy I guess, never tried white.
Black also has thicker skin and larger berries in general.

Personally I would plant haskap instead, even better taste imo and very early fruit but needs cold climate, you need to live in zone 7 or below, even zone 7 might be pushing it.
>>
I think I have a mild allergy to tomato leaves.
I've been blowing my nose ever since they started growing and it goes away if I spend time outside my room but gets worse if I water them or touch them for whatever reason.
I never noticed this when I was working with them in previous years, only this year when I had to start my plants in my room because of lack of space in my usual place, must not have had enough exposure to them back then.
I' don't know if I can bear this for another month, I might just risk it and plant them before last frost date.
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>>2716428
I've never heard of that before but apparently it's a thing. Fascinating. If you normally have allergies and thus have allergy pills at home (like ceterizine), consider popping one to see if the symptoms go away, that should give you clear confirmation it's an allergic reaction.
If you do decide to plant them outside, consider building them a mini greenhouse from some sticks and some translucent foil, that may even make enough of a heat difference that you could survive frost if it's not for too long.
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>>2716428
>>2716527
Water cloches
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>>2716370
I have 2 haskaps currently fruiting. The issue with getting more is that they're sort of in the "very expensive" phase of a novel fruit's adoption.



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