[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vr / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Search] [Home]
Board
Settings Home
/toy/ - Toys


Name
Options
Comment
Verification
4chan Pass users can bypass this verification. [Learn More] [Login]
File
  • Please read the Rules and FAQ before posting.
  • There are 15 posters in this thread.

05/04/17New trial board added: /bant/ - International/Random
10/04/16New board for 4chan Pass users: /vip/ - Very Important Posts
06/20/16New 4chan Banner Contest with a chance to win a 4chan Pass! See the contest page for details.
[Hide] [Show All]



Does anyone remember the all metal figure that was super expensive (like maybe in the thousands) but had I believe the most points of articulation?
>>
File: c321fb.jpg (210 KB, 600x832)
210 KB
210 KB JPG
Zoho Artform?
>>
>>7044074
Real Doll?
>>
File: zoho artform dr.jpg (230 KB, 960x1279)
230 KB
230 KB JPG
It's ZoHo Artform.
costs about $10,000 to get the cheapest all aluminum one.
>>
>>7044685
>>7045076
Thanks, guys. That's insane... More expensive than I even recalled...
>>
>>7045076
Holy fuck that posing though, that looks like a 3D render, not a picture of a “toy.” Artform indeed.
>>
>>7045076
>>7044685
>all metal
>ball joints
>friction joints
>no ratchet joints
ENJOY YOUR $10,000 FLOPPY MESS!!
>>
File: zoho artform.jpg (44 KB, 700x473)
44 KB
44 KB JPG
>>7048394
>implying the Zoho is engineered as shittily as zincshit toys
You probably think that your diecast is actually expensive to make and isn't a budget metal that's cheaper to mold than plastic, sold to morons who think weight = expensive
>>
>>7048425
Not him, but what exactly is keeping this thing's joints from just deteriorating and going limp in the span of 1 month?
>>
>>7048433
The fact it's an art piece and not something you would play with like your animu girls.
>>
File: ZoHoArt2.jpg (350 KB, 631x875)
350 KB
350 KB JPG
>>7048433
better metals and the fact that there's a ton of obviously little screw holes to tighten shit.

There's likely cups inside there too, considering each hand is made up of 100 pieces.
>>
>>7048453
That looks amazing.
>>
>>7048425
That's not how metals work. No metal is as flexible as plastic to mitigate the microscopic abrasions of direct contact friction joints.
>>7048453
The screws are there to make the figure loose so you can move it without damaging the metals.
>>
>>7044074
are there any figures out there that aim to realistically emulate the range of movement a normal human has? it would have to have no swivel or ball joints that could rotate 360 degrees since humans cant do that.
>>
>>7048450
>Intentionally making a highly posable figure out of a material that can't handle much stress and will go floppy after a few poses
>That is okay because it is art
>>
>>7048565
A lot of hard plastics are like inferior aluminum alloys in characteristics, down the mediocre elongation characteristics. The advantage of hard plastics is they're cheap to make at precise dimensions where metal casting needs extra finish for the same kind of fit and finish. Also the most common rigid plastics are all "crystalline plastics" or some such which have a defining characteristic of being highly reactive to solvents which in some product manufacturing applications is a plus

Metal on metal industrial locomotion lasts about as well as non lubricant impregnated plastics, even tougher ones like nylon much less ABS. I'd wager chromed, hardend steel even without lube would outlast plastic on plastic by far. There are also plenty of high viscosity greases that keep things relatively tight while preserving the surface
>>
>>7048579
>He doesnt understand art
>>
Also, the zinc and tin shit that's used for diecast cant be compared to something like hardened steel. I'm will to bet even plain stock steel or aluminum that's been polished would hold up longer than plastic on plastic. I wouldn't try it but a non lubed hobby motion system made from aluminum rails and steel ball based bearings would probably last hundreds of miles of motion even with a high preload.
>>
>>7049297
>I'd wager chromed, hardend steel even without lube would outlast plastic on plastic by far
Depends on the kind of joints and hardness/flexibility of the steel, but overall plastic joints will probably serve you better 9/10 times if you're talking about things at the scale of toys. In industrial equipment or large scale machines, "joints" don't use simple two piece friction for resistance any way. Everything is ratchets and hydraulics for the most part, which metals are better suited for. More often than not, moving pieces in those kinds of equipment try to reduce friction because of wear.
>>
>>7049394
>Everything is ratchets and hydraulics for the most part
Lol what

What am I even reading here? Most precision motion uses servos driven by electromagnetically powered motors. Hydraulics and ratchets are for like heavy equipment where you need tens of tons of pressure
>>
>>7049874
>>7049394
>In industrial equipment or large scale machines
Can you even read. I was trying to justify your arguments for you by giving examples of when metals are favorable. Servos also don't use two piece contact friction for resistance. They use gears and are predominantly made out of plastics especially with smaller machines. Unless you can convince me that metals could be used to make better simple frictions joints with actual examples like you've stated multiple times now, just stop trying.
>>
File: GSL12.jpg (136 KB, 800x592)
136 KB
136 KB JPG
>>7048579
>>7048565
You're stupid for assuming everything is as cheaply made as the toys you own.

Again, they use 100 pieces for the hands alone. If you look at hands and try to count all the pieces that you see on the surface, there's maybe 50-60 pieces there.
So there's obviously internal pieces, because it's engineered like other mechanical metal equipment that has moving joints.
Shit that is meant to last for years and decades, even lifetimes because most people leave that shit and don't care that the performance (read: stiffer) has gotten worse.

There's a reason the Zoho Artform costs over $10,000 and your poorfag toys are $30, unless they're overpriced import shit where that extra cost is because tiny market.
>>
File: sku_149799_1.jpg (37 KB, 600x600)
37 KB
37 KB JPG
>>7044074
Creative iron wire robot. Made of wire so infinite articulation. Very nice.
>>
>>7050256
>metal equipment that has moving joints
>last for years and decades
Even the most rigorously lubricated parts of complex machinery are in a constant state of maintenance or being replaced. Many different metals are useful for many different purposes, per volume plastics could not handle the level of torque or pressure metals could endure, but that doesn't make it a miracle material that's superior in all applications.
I'm not saying that the Zoho figure is a badly made art piece. It probably just isn't a good toy. For a collector who has the patience to loosen every joint before moving it, and will only pose it a few times that's fine. It's not meant to be played with like the average toy, it's meant to be a poseable sculpture.
Also, the engineering under the Zoho figures are either fairly simple or if they aren't could be reproduced in a simple way (at least they could be today I'm not sure when these came out). The art of Zoho isn't in its engineering complexity but in its precision manufacturing (the machining of the inside of the ass-cheeks in particular are impressive) and aesthetic presentation.
>>
File: metalfatigue.jpg (108 KB, 960x960)
108 KB
108 KB JPG
>>7050386
Infinite until it succumbs to...




Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.