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File: Mandelbrot.jpg (67 KB, 480x360)
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Anyone else enjoy zooming in on the Mandelbrot set and other fractals to see what patterns you can find? I still can't wrap my head around how a pattern with infinite complexity forms from such a simple equation
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I really love the mandelbrot function. It's quite easy to code, and have it zoom in. I find it really comfy and frightening at the same time. Comfy because it's an object I've been around for a long time, and frightening because of its endless complexity and those edges,

Check out some other iterated function, you dont have to limit yourself to z_n+1 = z_n^2 + c
>>
linux mint has Xaos as a package
installs easy with the Synaptic package manager
>>
Fractals are cool
>>
File: bob.png (17 KB, 912x615)
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>>9697392
>>
>>9697392
Do these zoom in actually use verification methods?
Or are they just blindly guessing, I know that for eg. the Julia set, there exists a method to guarantee that certain elements are really inside, or outside.

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Let me check with the smart people on 4chan sci they're intelligent people
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>>9697749
Fucks your question then?
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>>9697765
>he's not even smart enough to get OP's question

How embarrassing.
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>>9697749
*there
>>
>>9697749
baset

Why can't we find a graviton?
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>>9697711
Gravity is fact, sorry. You can prove it by dropping a pencil.
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>>9697715
No sir, that proves density and buoyancy. The pencil is denser than the air around it so it goes down.
>>
>>9697723
Disproven lies. Objects still drop in vacuum chambers and at the same speed as eachother.
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>>9697726
Yeah, because the objects are both nearly equally denser than the vacuum.
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>>9697731
Wrong again, troll. Objects fall at the same speed in a vacuum regardless of their mass or density.

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hello anons, can you guys help me with solving V1
also
>R3 = 3 x R4
>VAB = VA-VB= 40 V
>>
40 = I(500 + 3R4)
5 = I * R4
Solve that system of equations and you now have the current and resistances. Then just get V1
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>>9696517
Woops, it's 40 = I(500 - 3R4)
>>
>>9696517
VB = +5V since VB-V4 = 0

That puts VA at 45V since VAB = VA-VB therefore VA = VAB+VB which is VA = 40V + 5V

Now basic voltage divider VB = VA(R3/(R2+R3))
(VB/VA) = R3/(R2+R3)
5/45 = R3/500+R3
(5/45)(500+R3) = R3
55.55+0.111*R3 = R3
55.55 = R3 - 0.111R3
55.55 = 0.889R3
R3 = 62.5 ohm

Now find equivalent resistance between VA and VB so 500+62.5 = 562.5 easy given that we can get the current by I = (VAB/562.5) = (40/562.5) = 71.1mA

Now it's ez-pz V1 - V4 = I*(R1+R2+R3) solving for V1 you get V1 = I*(R1+R2+R3) + V4 which is V1 = (0.0711A)(100+500+62.5) + 5V

V1 = 52.1V give or take a few mV due to rounding.
V1 = 42.1
>>
>>9697772
Ignore that last line there V1 = 42.1. I made a mistake with the sign of with V4 in the last equation. That answer is wrong and I meant to delete it but I guess I forgot. The 52.1V above is the correct answer.
>>
File: verified.png (11 KB, 415x317)
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>>9697772
>>9697778
Here's the answer verified with simulation. Replaced R4 with a constant 5V voltage source because that's basically what it's acting like. Could also replace it with a 71.1mA constant current source, same shit. Or you could just stick a 70.4 ohm resistor in there which would be the actual resistor value of R4. You'll develop the same VAB voltage regardless of how you represent it.

>he cares about the social impact of his findings rather than just finding out what’s true
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>>9697569
>He doesn't want to get a PhD by becoming the world's leading expert in Belgian belt buckles from 1648-1717
>>
Science is performed using the public's money. If you want to do research without worrying about the effects, pony up the money yourself.
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>>9697664
If you’re avoiding specific findings you’re not doing science
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>>9697710
If you're employing the scientific method to obtain empirical evidence you are doing science. Anything else you're saying is some retarded gatekeeping bullshit.
>>
>>9697714
Yeah and if you’re avoiding gathering certain evidence then reasoning from there to avoid certain conclusions you may as well give up

File: nanoparticles.jpg (44 KB, 400x300)
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There seems to be a disproportionate amount of math and physics fags on this board.

I have a PhD in chemistry, ask me anything about materials science

but not organic chemistry cause i'm not a faggot
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Do you know someone who went to a high-tier uni for a year as an exchange student and if so, how did they do it?

My BSc in chemistry was average at best, but my thesis was the best of the year and I'm currently involved in a project which is a joint-venture with a prestigious prof. I'm hoping that I'll somehow get in contact with him so that he can send me to Harvard for a year (he did his post-doc there) during my MSc. Is my plan realistic?
>>
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>>9697320
I don't know my IQ, but I've done very well in academia, particularly in mathematics, often with little effort. So I'm above average I suppose. I don't care if others will look at me like an idiot (they won't) because I'm not spooked
>mfw people actually care about validation and fulfillment
>>
>>9697352
I haven't done anything with my life and won't be able to do much since the only part of my IQ score that was good was my verbal intelligence
>>
>>9697383
That's probably the one that is least able to be trained, so just pick up a math book and go to a community college or something. I and most of my colleagues started at community college, I've found the education is better there because the teachers aren't indians who hate their jobs. Take advice from someone allegedly smarter than you and stop being a brooding angsty faggot
>>
>>9697383
Verbal intelligence is necessary for higher math. Actually it's more important than spatial reasoning.

Biomedical gerontologist Aubrey de Grey (PhD, University of Cambridge) believes that we have at least a 50% chance of achieving 'longevity escape velocity' (adding more than 1 year to our remaining lifespan each year) within the next 20 years. He has invested almost his entire net worth (less the value of his personal effects and primary residence) into a foundation working towards this goal, the SENS Research Foundation, based in Mountain View, California. (www.sens.org).

De Grey estimates that the SENS Research Foundation requires approximately $40m in annual funding to maximise the pace of the research - the limiting factor at that point being the inherent difficulty of the science.

The Foundation currently has approximately $5m in annual funding, and De Grey estimates that the speed of progress is currently only about a third of what it would be at $40m/year.

Do you believe in this project? Can it be achieved at all, on any timescale? And is it likely, in your view, that we will reach 'longevity escape velocity' in a ~20 year timeframe?

A brief introduction to his ideas and work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2o8LKdFtmY

Read his PhD manuscript here: http://www.sens.org/files/pdf/MiFRA-06.pdf

See here for his academic credentials: http://www.sens.org/sites/srf.org/files/AdG-CV.doc

And see here for details of the members of the Scientific Advisory Board of the SENS Research Foundation: http://www.sens.org/about/leadership/research-advisory-board

Here’s a recent video with BBC News: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/technology-43402894/aubrey-de-grey-treating-ageing-as-a-curable-disease

Aubrey solves decades-old math problems for fun in his spare time: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/04/amateur-mathematician-cracks-decades-old-math-problem, https://www.quantamagazine.org/decades-old-graph-problem-yields-to-amateur-mathematician-20180417/
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>>9695690
oh, k
>>
>>9687218
>What is Peter Thiel
>>
>>9696406

ok
>>
Why hasn't Aubrey funded a Super Bowl ad? his would be the biggest medical breakthrough of all time, and if he publicised it like that, surely he'd have plenty of money almost instantly
>>
>>9697735
SENS does not search for "a breakthrough", it researches a large variety of medical treatments and info that happen to be tangentially related. There's no immortality potion, just like there's no generic cure for "injury" or "infectious disease".

File: bacteriophage1.jpg (187 KB, 1241x1062)
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Why do viruses look like nano-tech machines?
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>>
Virsuses are nonliving. They become living once they enter a host.
>>
How does it inject the genetic material?
>>
>>9697474
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFXuxGuT7H8
>>
>>9697474
by binding to receptors
>>
>>9697306

nothing has a purpose, pretty easy. and structures aren't hard either

File: 1498941632098.jpg (60 KB, 807x646)
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You should be able to solve this, /sci/.
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>>9696945
except that your assumption x+20=16+32 is wrong

I think its time for you to give up science if you are this much of a brainlet
>>
>>9696945
But clearly the areas were changed as to shift the point in one direction it will change one pair of areas which was done twice.
>>
>>9697641
A+C and B+D remains unchanged, though
>>
File: is this art.png (469 KB, 807x646)
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>>9697620
Hegelian Physiognomics

File: download_20180420_141631.jpg (163 KB, 2048x1536)
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A or B /sci/ and why?
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>>9697191
This isn't even actually explaining anything. "It's A because I imagine it to be A, it's not even that hard if you visualize it"
>>
>>9697341
t. virgin
>>
>>9697341
It's not a fucking hoop becae the otange pprtal moves in relationship to tge blue one.
>>
>>9685848
so the people who answer B
are they treating the area on either side of the portal as more than just two rooms stitched together by a door frame?

since portals do not seem to be a real construct I guess whether you think A or B depends on whether you see portals as a window frame/door frame or whether you see them as <something else>
>>
>>9697741
B here. They are window frames, just window frames where both sides can move in relation to each other. Essentially, it's a different window depending on which side you're on.

Anybody here heard of telomerase ? Why isn't everybody talking about it?
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>>9690021
immortal life is more precious so many people will bunker up and live in basements using pcs to work and spend free time or something
>>
>>9695788
she also got myostatin inhibition going on so shell turn into hulk anytime soon
>>
>>9688703
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0053760
conflicting evidence on this but calorie restriction + tolemerase lengthening would avoid the extra cancer risk
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZYNADOHhVY

''
>>
>>9689058
dom neg mutations in p53 may cause cancer too nibba, maybe you don't want 7 copies

Hey does anyone have any tricks for converting a ratio into percentages, I have a test coming up and im absolutely shit at doing it.
3 replies omitted. Click here to view.
>>
>>9697645
1:2
1/(1+2) = 1/3
(1/3)*100% = 33%
>>
>>9697671
Nigga what
>>
>>9697683
What ratio do you want to convert to a percent?
>>
>>9697686
Not OP, but let's sayyyy, I dunno, 1 out of 6? To keep things more or less simple
>>
>>9697689
1/6 and then x 100 so 1/6=0.1666... x 100 = 16.66% or 17% whatever you want with rounding.

File: quantum_photonics.jpg (88 KB, 670x243)
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A Ph.D. in experimental/applied physics is more impressive, more employable, and more useful to society than a Ph.D. in electrical engineering by a longshot. Prove me wrong.

>Protip: you can't.
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>>9697398
Except English is probably his second language you dipshit.
>>
>>9696557
experimental physics is where brainlets who failed end up usually
>>
>>9697546
*accept
>>
Physics is for the brainlets who couldn't get accepted into an Engineering program during high school.
>>9697461
they aren't though, they want to do on the inside. It's because they realize they made a massive mistake and are too deep into their programs to drop out.
>>
>>9697657
What if I'm interested in the theoretical side of things, where an education in theoretical physics makes more sense that an education in engineering?

Do any of you guys use AI/machine learning for research? How does it work for you?
>>
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>>9697430
>machine learning
>science
pick one

File: math.jpg (52 KB, 1024x512)
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Should people who get less than a 90% in Linear Algebra be banned from getting a STEM degree?
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>>9697003
What clown college do you go to?
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>>9696882
What kind of calc 3 class doesn't require LA as a prerequisite?
>>
>>9697040
Perhaps you're thinking of real analysis? Calc 3 was before linear algebra for me, we relearned the vector bullshit and 3 dimensional geometry from a linear algebra perspective and then learned all the other stuff. Calc 3 was just basic vector algebra, double and triple integrals in [math]\mathbb{R}^3 [/math], stoke's theorem, partial derivatives and optimization, etc
>>
>>9697040
Not every fucking place has the same structre and or curriculum. LA is troublesome, as a lot of mutts take basically how to operate matrices and stupid shit like that is seen either in high school or some advanced algebra course (what college algebra was before). I took linear algebra in tandem with calc 3, and I used it for very few things, and the course was self contained. More abstract theory came in the proof of lagrange multipliers, and with the second derivative test for scalar functions using the spectral theorem, but it was really just using the results, solving the problems weren't really related to linear algebra.
>>
>>9696704
No? I got a B- because I was a dumb freshman who didn't care. After sophomore year, I got straight A's and was consistently top of my class before graduating with a 3.84.



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