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I'm looking to buy something on a budget to haul 15kg but the specs say maximum 10kg (5kg each) Are all budget panniers this garbage if you choose not to pay 200+ euros?
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are you allergic to looking through the catalog, faggot?
>>1974892
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>>1978473
that thread is garbage faggot
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>>1978474
you are garbage, faggot
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you can get a good set for less than 20 eurodollars, pretty sure my front rollers were like $150 for both
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Crosso Dry are relatively cheap and the stated limit is 17,5 kg per pannier. I don't know about their availability outside of Poland but they do have an international website.
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>>1978539
looks good but not available here
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The bag isn't where the weight limit comes from, it's the rack.
I know some countries have very specific safety standards (thinking of Germany), where they probably specify some limit per bag. But you can ignore it.

Pic is from a decade ago. Just out of college, living in an apartment without w/d hookups, I would haul my laundry a couple miles to the closest non-ghetto laundromat.
A pair of Ortlieb Classics, and a SealLine 80L kayaking bag on a $30 Planet Bike rack. Not ideal, but it's what I had.

When fully loaded I would get that "tail wagging the dog" effect--feels bad man.
As soon as I found a front rack at the coop, I switched to a four pannier setup. Did my laundry like that for about two years.

>>1978543
>asks for suggestions
>doesn't post his location/country
>complains "not available here"
Come on.
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if you want to be cheap do this
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>>1978462
those in your pic are in normal polyester with thin plastic inserts at the bottom and sides to give rigidity. they also attach to the rack with simple straps, really not ideal.
if you have heavy duty in mind you need more sturdy bags. touring bags are usually vinyl or strong fabric (choose based on your water resisiting needs) with a thick plastic insert at the back for rigiduty. they also have more stable and easy to use clips and levers to attach on the rack. i like vaude. many like ortliebs.
i see you are in europe, just go with decathlon choice is wide, and they aregood. if you get a nice sale you shouldn't pay more than 80-100euros for a pair of vaude ortlieb, with decathlon maybe 50-80
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>>1979171
>normal polyester
>touring bags are usually vinyl or strong fabric
I haven't looked up OPs bags, but the shiny panels could easily be vinyl or PU coated fabric.
And with vinyls, it's quite common for the backing layer to be woven polyester. That's what you'll find with outdoor/marine vinyls (the "tough stuff").
I made a friend's panniers from Cordura HP (the 'P' stands for...), and of course they were plenty strong enough.

>thin plastic inserts ... thick plastic insert
It's not the thickness that matters, but the stiffness.
For example, the backers in my olde Ortlieb bags were not sufficient, and the lower 'corners' would bend in when loaded.

I replaced the original inserts with coroplast sheets (stuff used in US Mail totes, election signs, produce boxes etc). That ended up being: stiffer, lighter, cheaper ($0). That it was more thick was a downside.

>attach to the rack with simple straps
Straps are fine, as long as you can tension them. Haven't seen the back of OPs pic, but also I've rarely seen store bought bags w/ a long enough tail to really crank down on them.
Years ago a friend of a friend on a Big Dummy had a bag that came like that (straps long enough). I'm pretty sure, didn't examine it closely.

>they also have more stable and easy to use clips and levers
There's always play with the tab & hook system that Ortlieb and Vaude use. Otherwise you wouldn't be able to get the bags on/off. That slop is part of the reason I sold mine.
It's hard to beat the old school system: gutter hooks up top, with a bungee & long hook on the bottom. Simple, easy to work on/replace bits of it, fits more closely to the rack, especially off road.
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>>1978462
i use these spring loaded folding racks, can hold a lot of weight and you can you can fold them in when you don't need them.
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>>1978539
Based Mezcal enjoyer
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>>1978466
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I'm quite pleased and thus surprised even with how my current setup came out.
After alot of trying different things I arrived at using two cheap chinese panniers, with attached QR buckles that originally served to hold the top bag that came with the lot.
As the top bag sucked and soon broke I chose to sew webbing for it. Now I can strap down any bag or item on top.
Weight limits are derived from experimentation in the development proccess, there is no standard or mandatory proceedure and manufacturers probably cover their ass by stating laughable maximum loads. Then again I had many big name panniers pop rivets and the likes.
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>>1978462
I'm gonna be sewing my own bags out of heavy duty nylon so be on the look out
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>>1980720
Rigging up old inner tubes to hang them is also kinda neat
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>>1978473
>>1978475
kys
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>>1980721
Not OP but this is precisely what I needed. Now I just need to find buckles that are adjustable on both sides, which is harder than you'd expect.
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Why do they never get stolen?
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>>1982652
I've never had someone steal a pannier or handlebar bag, but twice I've had someone take a framebag. It's so dumb, because I make one for each of my bikes, so it's custom-fit to that frame.
There wasn't anything truly valuable in either... Topeak pump, multitool, etc. The most annoying thing was losing my favorite pocket knife.

What I started doing after #2 was using an two bits of old brake cable to secure the bag at two points. One around the seat tube, one around the head tube, each loop as small as possible. Two because it's much harder to "build up speed" when trying to pull on the bag, can't really get a strong jerk motion.

For each loop, I'll put a pair of grommets in the bag, run the cable around the tube, through the grommets, and secure the ends using two of these little aluminum things. The smallest ones from Home Depot work well with brake cable. I pinch the shit out of the fittings with a big Knipex pliers wrench.
All of that is under a velcro strap, so it's not normally visible, and water doesn't get in the grommet holes. It's the best I could come up with for a retrofit solution.

But it's not truly secure--anyone with a pair of pliers could probably dismantle this. It only prevents opportunity theft. But at the same time, I haven't had a bag stolen since 2017.

I very rarely take the bags off once I make them (once every two or three years?), but it's simple enough to snip the things off and install new loops.
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>>1982788
>t's so dumb, because I make one for each of my bikes, so it's custom-fit to that frame.
pics? I wanna make some
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>>1979163
My rack is rated for 25kg and it's mounted on a steel road bike. I already hauled 20kg using a strapped duffle bag but the handling is atrocious obviously.
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>>1983973
Pulled this one out of the closet, the oldest self-made framebag I still have around. Kind of strange to look at, because this was many "lasts" for me. After this I got an industrial sewing machine, and changed several design cues.

Pic 1 for scale. This was for a 62cm frame, with room for two water bottles. Fabric is some kind of midweight X-pac.

Pic 2, #10 zip, 2" hook & loop. First few bags had uretek zippers, but the coating flakes off eventually, a 'rain flap' lasts longer.
Between the two loops is a overlap/vent on the edge panel. You can pass cables/tubing from the inside to the outside... never used it much. But it means you don't have to get the length of the edge fabric exact, which is very convenient during construction.
Now I use #8 zips and 1" Velcro "Qwik Tie" (low profile, used for computer cable wraps, etc). Still strong enough, and I only have to keep one roll of material.
Also for the top I use a full-length panel of fabric now. Doesn't catch your leg if you rub against it.

Pic 3 is the eyelet setup. The tools are in the background, from CS Osborne K231-0, forgot to take a separate pic. This edge panel is 2ΒΌ" wide finished, which is about right for a bike with 1" tubing. I've seen other people make their bags way too narrow.

Pic 4 is the 'thick'/DS side of the bag. No interior features, pockets, etc. See where the edge binding doesn't cover the first stitching? Doesn't affect the strength/function, but this disappeared as I got better at sewing bags. Better at sewing straight, and trimming on the waste side after laying the construction stitches.

Pic 5 is the 'thin'/NDS side. Has several pockets on the divider panel for phone, etc. I cut the rain flap the wrong orientation on this side (compare how the Xs line up in the 1st pic).
Now I tend to make bags that open only from the nds side, and these pockets are just under the zipper (like where the $20 is). Same capacity, only have to buy/sew one zipper, flap, etc.
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>>1984240
are you taking orders? I'd pay like 60-100 for one of these. i ordered one a while ago from a guy named cleveland mountaineering. its still going stong but i got a new boike.
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Its unbelievable there isn't a locking, motorcycle style saddle bags commonly available for a reasonable price.
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>>1985440
>motorcycle style
commonly they're like 10 kg
isn't that the main difference, that they're overbuilt and heavier and therefor totally inappropriate for a bicycle?

https://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/hardshell-locking-pannier
https://velobin.com/product/velobin/

oh look AND they exist

getting sick of autists complaining their niche nonsense doesn't exist when it does infact exist
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>>1985444
It's not the fucking BBS days, grandpa. All search is broken. Fuck do you think this bored is? Are you an exile from /tech with that attitude?
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>>1985444
>getting sick of autists complaining their niche nonsense doesn't exist when it does infact exist

And then they refuse to buy them because they aren't 10 bucks on aliexpress. Many such cases
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>>1985447
Non suckers are a real problem, comrade...should be standard and everywhere, and reasonable priced given number of bikes in the world, and it being the most common problem.

Better off cable locking a grizzly proof cooler to a bike at this point.
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>>1980721
nice! never seen anything but webbing used for those strap release buckles. although a square knot would probably accomplish the same thing.
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>>1984240
do you sell them?
id love to have some custom bags made to autistic perfection
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>>1978473
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how are these? i always see them on old $25 craigslist bikes and have been tempted to grab one and take it off.
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>>1979234
i have one
its based in theory but in practice it sucks
no good way to mount it to the bike and dangling from the handlebars sucks it fucked up my bars and front brake
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>>1982650
you can probably bulk buy a load on aliexpress
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>>1982652
not worth stealing
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>>1990382
why tf would you just dangle it, i attached mine to the side of the rear carrier and zip tied it to the frame, rock solid.
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>>1990586
how would you mount it to the front of a bike with a vbrake tho?
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>>1990838
honestly don't mount it to the front of the bike to begin with. it's much more convenient on the side of rear carriers. if you must have a front basket get something specifically designed for it with enough clearance for the brakes and solid mounting.
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Just like most bike parts, look on eBay for some old used ones.
You won't get waterproof options at a fair price but you can just line the inside of you bag with a black trash bag. Honestly it's a better solution than waterproof bags in any case if you ask me.

Waterproof bags suck as bags compared to regular bags
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>>1978462
i tried these wire ones. pros: they fold away. cons: too slim to fit bulkier stuff like back packs. Even though their combined volume is equal to a milk crate, i can stuff more into a single compartment milk crate rather than 2 half sized compartments. also the height and location of the milk crate is more accessible in terms of retrieving stuff, and working on the bike, cleaning. lopsidedness of having just one side open as often i just need one side open for a few items. whereas the milk crate is never lopsided and don't have to balance the weight of items over two panniers.
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>>1991213
The problem with a milk crate is just having the weight so high makes the bike handle a bit weirdly over down low. Though I think this can be mitigated a bit if you load the weight on the front, I also don't really notice too much only having say one pannier on the front either.



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