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File: screw.png (3.55 MB, 2005x1128)
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>a
>fucking
>screw
Eurosistas, they'll make fun of us...
>>
What could have been...
>>
File: 0107692533.jpg (114 KB, 971x654)
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>>1990902
Instead we're now getting the Scharfenberg-based thing that is incompatible and will make conversion an absolute mess.
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>>1990899
>to proud to use the superior Janney coupler
You get what you deserve.
>>
>>1990899
How much trailing tonnage can one of those really handle?
>>
>>1990903
why isn't the air hose in the middle?
do they never have to wye their cars?
>>
>>1990987
I live in the EU. I`ve seen regular industrial trains sporting that and like 40 loaded wagons put together. So I`d say it is really solid.
>>
>>1990899
Manual coupling aside, I imagine that the buffers create a more solid and controllable train though, yeah? Do European trains not have to worry as much about slack/compression due to them, or is it basically like having two draft gear knuckle couplers?
>>
That's nothing compared to the GOAT knuckle. Try using that weak shit on 85+ cars up a 4% grade.
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>>1991871
And her sister helping on the rear. Look how hard that beast is working.
>>
>>1991031
That dangling air hose will be mounted in the bottom hole on the coupler. That photo is a conversion installation (note the wear marks where the buffers used to be).
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>>1991831
>I live in the EU. I`ve seen regular industrial trains sporting that and like 40 loaded wagons put together. So I`d say it is really solid.
it's actually stronger then the old screw coupler
>>
Why are there so many posts from seething Americans lately?
>>1990902
>>1990903
latter is superior though because it automates brake pipe connection
>>
>>1991920
Which Americans are seething? Are these Americans in the room with you right now???
>>
>>1991926
>he thinks OP wasn't posted by an american
>>
>>1990903
I wasn't able to find anything definitive. But it is unlikely that train lengths in the EU are going to go above 750m ( about half a mile ). At the same time there is an effort to raise the permissible axle load system-wide to 25t. This puts the upper limit of train weight at about 5000t. Thus with a safety factor of, say, three you have an upper limit of 15000t.

>>1990983
Janney is not 'superior'. It is merely semi-automatic. The new euro coupler will automatically couple digital signals for electric brakes and, I think, also air lines. It makes it superior to both Janney and SA3.

Granted - it is at least 50 years too late.
>>
>>1991933
I'm not a burger thoughbaitever
>>
File: all aboard.gif (1.86 MB, 540x281)
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not a train autist so i don't really know anything about this stuff, but i am kind of shocked that this isn't a solved technology by now. theories/histories/rants/unhinged conspiracy theories on why that is?
>>
>>1993423
It's pretty much solved, Europe just hung on to the old way a bit too long
>>
>>1993423
Reason we're still using screw couplers in Europe is because Europe is very fragmented between dozens of different freight companies and state-owned railway networks. In order for the European railway network to function, though, every country needs to get aboard the automatic coupler train at the same time, and the conversion needs to be carried out in a short span of time. It's a very complex puzzle that needs to be laid, and the last time an attempt to convert was made, it didn't happen in the end.
Besides that, screw couplers can handle at least 4000 tons on the largely flat central European network, so for most european trains they've been sufficient - the reason the change might actually be happening this time is all the benefits and savings from a system where mechanics, pneumatics, electrics and electronics are all coupled together automatically. If it actually happens this time, Europe will jump from being 100 years behind the rest of the world, to being 100 years ahead of the rest of the world.

also knuckle couplers doesnt change that amerifags cant run railways for shit, "precision railroading" is just running trains on a timetable and you couldnt even do that right fkin omg
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File: standards.png (24 KB, 500x283)
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>>1993423
it's literally just pic related
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>>1993528
>Europe will jump from being 100 years behind the rest of the world, to being 100 years ahead of the rest of the world
It will catch up to the rest of the world you mean
>>
>>1993541
the rest of the world doesn't have automatic brake and electrical coupling
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>>1993555
Are you sure?
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>>1993557
not outside of multiple units, no
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>>1993562
>Goalpost status:
>Moved
>>
>>1993563
goalpost status: not moved, as europe is planning to have automatic brake and electrical coupling on all rolling stock
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>>1993565
That's not ahead of the rest of the world, as that technology is already in use in various countries outside of Europe

I welcome you guys to the 20th century however
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>>1993567
>as that technology is already in use in various countries outside of Europe
On freight? Where?
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>>1993580
Just stop moving the goalposts
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>>1993582
see >>1993562 and >>1993565
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>>1993585
Again, welcome to the 20th century
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>>1991867
Buffers and screw coupling work well only if you couple the train correctly: when coupling, the buffers should touch and the screw coupling should be tightened. By this you ensure - as you correctly state - that slack and compression are mitigated. Now guess who does it by the book today. I'll help you there: nobody. Even in OPs pic the screw coupling is hanging a bit and the buffers aren't compressed meaning that as soon as this train starts to move, the buffers get a slight gap between them.

The new DAC should mitigate this problem as the Schaffensberg type heads connect without gaps thus no slack between cars will occur.
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>>1990903
gee whiz i love another boondoggle from "totally-not-a-monopoly" voith
and current (lv.4 or some shit) doesn't support data transfer (which is on lv.5 of spec, and is still as elusive as ETCS lv. 3)
FFS euroniggers can screw literally fucking everything
>>
>>1993590
What countries have automatic brake and electrical coupling on all rolling stock?
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>>1993684
I thought Yuros were lazy but you have moved the goalposts so many times I've changed my mind
>>
>>1993687
>amerifag enters thread about freight train couplers
>uppity euronigger suggests amerifag couplers won't be superior in the future
>to maintain the facade of amerifag supremacy, amerifag immediately moves goalposts to include passenger trains, accuses euronigger of moving goalposts
>gets called out
to be continued

>>1993633
DAC level 4 supports data transfer, DAC level 5 includes remote uncoupling. Level 4 also includes train integrity checks, so it'll allow ETCS level 3. You're right that ETCS level 3 is very far off though.
>>
>>1993824
>histrionic response
I never mentioned North American couplers at all.
>>
>>1993687
see >>1993565
>>
>>1993837
Yes you keep moving the goalposts, was there anything else
>>
>>1993838
that's evidence that even if i moved the goalposts once - which i didn't - i didn't move them again
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>>1993846
Incorrect. Congrats on upgrading to 20th century tech btw.
>>
>>1993831
Ah, whatever, you're no fun.
>>
>>1993528
>"precision railroading"
No, that's just a term for corporate greed. Prior to the late 1990s, railroads were run properly in this country and you could still have your small business shipped to by rail.
>>
>>1993848
>Incorrect.
[citation needed]
>Congrats on upgrading to 20th century tech btw.
Again, what country had automatic brake and electrical connections outside multiple units in the 20th century?
>>1993875
and in the 1990s people were saying how railroads used to be properly run back in the 1970s
the truth is american railroads were never run well
>>
>>1993945
>Again, what country had automatic brake and electrical connections outside multiple units in the 20th century?
You're arguing in bad faith. Refer to >>1993528:
>all the benefits and savings from a system where mechanics, pneumatics, electrics and electronics are all coupled together automatically
>Europe will jump from being 100 years behind the rest of the world, to being 100 years ahead of the rest of the world.
You're catching up to everyone else by abandoning the hook and chain and using a coupler system developed in the 20th century. Welcome. Perhaps it will even help abate your inferiority complex towards the US, but I wouldn't bet on it.
>>
>>1993970
If the coupler system is already developed, why hasn't any country rolled it out to their entire fleet?
>>
>>1994163

>>1993528
>because Europe is very fragmented between dozens of different freight companies and state-owned railway networks
>>
>>1994188
...and why have no non-european countries done it?
>>
>>1995052
I accept your concession.
>>
>>1995128
How is that a concession you braindead mongoloid?
>>
>>1990899
How do the threads on that small screw hold the weight of the entire train?
>>
>>1994163
>why hasn't any country rolled it out to their entire fleet?
First of all, there's more than one (way more than one) railway companies operating in each of those countries, especially in freight. Secondly, trains regularly cross boarders too. New systems are hard to get out there because the moment that car is incompatibel with the rest of vehicles out there it can no longer be used for most of its purposes. There's repeatedly been attempts and low-volume implementation, eg. on iron-ore trains in germany that would've been too heavy for buffer-&-chain but ultimately for most applications the advantages are not worth widespread incompatibility as of now.
>>
>>1993628
Ah, cool. Thanks for the explanation. We don't have that type of coupler here, and I was curious about the differences. A shame no one does it correctly, presumably because a guy would have to be between two wagons compressing, which is dangerous? Hopefully these new ones work out better for everyone involved.
>>
>>1993945
>and in the 1990s people were saying how railroads used to be properly run back in the 1970s
Literally no one in the 90's wanted the good old days of bankruptcy back you fucking retard
>>
>>1997661
I doubt very much that there was no one at the coalface in the 1990s who thought things were better twenty years ago!



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