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If you want help picking out a bike, post your height, what you will use the bike for, and a link to your local craigslist.

>I want to buy a new bike. What should I watch out for?
Don't buy Wal-Mart garbage.
Don't buy department store garbage.
Beware of amazon and alibaba garbage.

>Should I buy from Bikes Direct?
If you are clueless enough that you need to ask, no. If you have no mechanical ability, no. If the alternative is walmart, maybe. Ask first.

>I want to buy a used bike. What should I watch out for and where should I buy?

Craigslist is good for old bikes. Pinkbike.com/buysell is good for used modern mid- to high- end mountain bikes.
Ask in /bbg/ if uncertain.

Be aware that a used bike will need some repairs and adjustments. The most likely parts to need replacement are tubes, tires, brake pads, and chain. Chains are a wear item. Inspect all of these things as well as sprocket teeth, brake performance, shifting performance, and check bearings (bottom bracket, headset, and wheel hubs) for play, and check wheels for wobble. If there is a lot wrong with the bike, you may have to put a lot of money into it for parts, and money or time for repairs.

>What size bike should I buy?
The right size.
https://goodcalculators.com/bike-size-calculator/
>>
https://lynchburg.craigslist.org
https://richmond.craigslist.org
I'm familiar with both these cities but I would have to travel to both of them
>>1993008
I'm looking for an older road bike, ideally something that I could put a rack on. I'm not well versed in bicycles, I've only rode cheap mountain bikes from when I was younger. I would be using it mostly on paved roads, bikepacking being the end goal. I'm 6 foot.
>>
>>1993010
if you're inexperienced, looking for vintage and don't want to spend an arm and a leg, i suggest buying a $20-$50 pos, and spending the rest of your budget on basic tools and new tires. this way you can learn what you like and don't like without spending a lot of money. you'll also learn basic maintenance which will be beneficial in the future. if you hate the bike, you just put the old tires back on and re-list it for the same price you paid and try something else. 80s jap bikes are a great value. Miyata, Nishiki, Centurion, Panasonic, Shogun, etc.
>>
>>1993003
Putting bikes direct and amazon/walmart bikes in the same category shows you have no idea what you're talking about. Just because there is a cultural taboo against swapping the 105 crankset and putting in fsa and still calling it a "105 build" doesn't mean it's in the same league as grip shifting monstrosities. I agree the marketing is skeezy and the bikes have negative prestige and many of the customers are probably pretty clueless but it's still better than a random craiglist dumpster dive, and btw you'll need mechanical ability on a mail order bike, unless maybe it's a canyon or something where it's meticulously done except for clamping the bars and sticking the front wheel in the dropouts
>>
How much do fork materials _really_ matter on a bike? I'm looking at Cannondale vs Trek for a hybrid and there's a $400 difference between otherwise similar bikes with Steel/Alloy/Carbon forks.
>>
>>1993021
also you should mention how awful b*cycle bl** b**k is and how it should be ignored. much more relevant than bikes direct which is only mildly distasteful
>>
>>1994782
If it takes wide tires and you pump them up to the right pressure for system weight + conditions the difference will only be in weight.
>>
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>>1993011
This is what I did. The bike itself was rubbish though and I ended up having to spend a lot of money replacing the steel rims, then brakes, then better levers to match those brakes, then new handlebars cause the diameter was too small for modern parts.
I can’t put a price on experience though.
>>
I know you're supposed to buy a quality used one if you're on a budget, but what's the best new bike I can get for under $300? Mainly going to be used on roads and dirt roads with maybe a little bit of trail use. I prefer thumb shifters over twist shifters. I can't buy used because I need a receipt. Insurance company is replacing one that was stolen.
>>
>>1994835
Can't you just use venmo to buy used and there's your receipt?
>>
>>1994837
I don't think they'll accept something that isn't from a major store. I was thinking of ordering one online from Academy Sports or Walmart and picking it up. I looked at the bikes they had on display in those stores; I didn't like any of them.
>>
>>1994835
something from decathlon
>>
>full carbon gravel bike frame for $500 from chinks
>Barely any reviews
Am I investing for a huge hospital bill or are they decent enough to get?
>>
>>1994865
I’ve heard that the low grade stuff has very poor quality workmanship. It’s carbon, don’t risk your death.
>>
>>1994867
You're right. Found some guy on leddit and it cracked open like glass.
>>
I've been looking for a perfect all-year multipurpose dropbar bike that fits for a long time and my local shop has this superior x-road elite gr.

https://superiorbikes.com/en-en/bikes/product/x-road-elite-gr/794

The geometry is super comfortable, but it doesn't seem like a do-it-all bike. Max tire width is 40mm and no full fender or rack. mounts

Any thoughts? should I keep looking?
>>
>>1994835
Literally not worth your money at $300

Posiden was selling redwoods for $500 new, bout the bottom line for me
>>
>>1993003
Hello people.
I start college next year and want a bike to commute. Do you recommend any particular city (hybrid?) bike around 500 euros? I have used bikes all my life and know basic maintenance/ got tools. However i have no idea about the market.
Thanks in advance.
>>
>>1995369
I can only speak from my personal experience. I own only 1 city bike and its the only city bike I've ever owned. I have owned countless of road, tri- TT- bikes and such.
Mine is a granville toronto 7 speed. It soon became my daily and I have abused the everliving hell out of it for 5 years or more. In a usual year I ride somewhere between 40k and 50k km, the majority of which was on this bike.
Actual issues so far: The factory kickstand is rubbish but I dont use kickstands.
It came with a suspension fork which is gay stupid and useless bloat on a bike of this type and would not be suitable for an actual offroad bike.
Everything else seems bullet proof.
Things that needed doing so far:
The usual maintenance:
Replacing brake pads, refilling and bleeding gay hydraulic brakes, replqcing broken spokes, oil service of the IGH, replacing worn through rims everytimes the wear indicator disappears, replacing the lights once after diodes blew, replacing shifter outer and cable, replacing front hydraulic line, service shocks (literally just friction dampened spring) replace BBs, replace pedals, cranks, replace chainring and cog, replace ergo grips. Of course replacing inner tubes and tires (shes currently on air + inners and marathon tires).
She is reasonably fast. A real beast of burden, with some ingenuity she will carry almost anything. She is bullet proof and, what made her become and remain my daily fast: There is hardly ever a problem that you can't delay sorting or anticipate. If you for example break a spoke you don't have to do that before tomorrow morning, you can ride like that.
The only thing i still feel weird about even ro this day is positioning on the bike, then again if after a crash I'm auffering from bad wrists I wouldnt want to ride low profile really.
So yeah. She's perfect. Do with that whatever you want.
>>
>>1995369
forget It, 500 euro is now a weird price point for new. You can't get anything from nice brands, and it's too much for unknown brands mistery meat.
So unfortunately I can't directly suggest you anything, mainly because I have some pretty strong opinions on what a commuter bike should look like but I don't want to groom you.
In university cities used market could be good, just don't buy stolen, you could still get some nice catch. For something new and reliable you can just buy a decent Decathlon bike or maybe a hardtail, but I hate the idea of commuting with suspensions.
Anyway, in university cities bike theft is common, you can't go around with something flashy and leave it for hours outside your library or dorm. You should get something either beat up and rusty or that looks beat up, get creative. Don't invest in nice saddles and invest in a nice lock.
If I had to suggest anything... It would be take a riverside 120 for 280 euro or less on sale, rough it up and get a nice abus or kryptonite lock, and plus point you can mount some nice fat 2+ tires on that b, which are something that I look for on a commuting bike (here I said It sorry for the grooming).
Either this or up your budget, but I don't know any serious university in the euro area where you could get away with a flashy bike, or go with a cheap used 3 speed If you live in a flat and "thefty" area.
>>
>>1995369
>>1995386
Or you could take a page out of the book of the nerds around here, and get a hipster cheap used road bike or fixie, your knees and ass will hurt but you'll look good with girls innit?
>>
>>1995386
hes a huge faggot anyways and deserves the cage
>>
what's the QRD on decathalon? planning to pick up a basic road bike for exercise and bikepacking, maybe some commuting.
>>
Sup /bbg/, my state is launching an ebike rebate incentive - $1500 or up to a percentage of the value of the bike based on your 2023 taxes (in my case it looks to be around 60% max). I'm interested in upgrading from my current MTB to an eMTB, ideally around the $2500-3000 range. Please note that this incentive is only for new builds, as far as I am aware.
I would like something that will be usable on a 15 mile commute each way (if I so desire) and good for trail riding. I'm 5'10" (~178cm if you hate freedom units), and 210lbs (95kg). Area around me is somewhat hilly so I'd like something with a bit of torque. So far trying to do my own research has me a bit overwhelmed since I get drowned out in loosely-veiled ads, and products that miss my market when trying to look up good ebikes at my price point. What are some bikes that would fill this description? From what I've seen anything quality starts hitting the 5-6k mark pretty quick, but I've seen some products that hang around my price point; I just don't want to drop over a grand on an "upgrade" that's total shit.
>>
>>1995371
>>1995386
>>1995388
Thanks for the input mates.
>>
>>1995391
Their dirt cheap bikes are great value, their entry level gravel bike Triban RC100 is like 300EUR and very ridable. Clothes are also pretty good. When it comes to their more expensive stuff, you're often better off with other brands, and don't buy non-decathlon brand stuff in their stores because it's usually more expensive.
>>
>>1995392
To my mind trail riding and commuting are completely different use cases, but setting that aside... Don't overthink things - walk into whatever local bike shop is closest to you and buy an e-MTB that's full suspension and has thru-axles front and rear. All the big brands have these in the 3-4k range and if you're not educated enough to geek out on the differences don't sweat it, you'll enjoy any riding any of these:
https://www.cannondale.com/en-us/bikes/electric/e-mountain/moterra-neo/moterra-neo-s3
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/stance-eplus-2-20mph
https://www.specialized.com/us/en/turbo-levo-sl-comp/p/154888?color=263664-154888
https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/mountain-bikes/electric-mountain-bikes/rail/rail-5-gen-2/p/35032/?colorCode=black_teal
>>
>>1994860
>Academy Sports.
No.
>Walmart.
Just fucking no.

Bikesdirect.

>>1994865
Do you know how to test carbon?
>>
Looking to restore my friend's bike. I got an old Sora STI 2x9 lying around. Now I just need chainring+crank and a rear derailleur. I have no idea about compatibility. Any suggestions which ones to buy? Can the chinks be trusted?
>>
>>1995523
>chainring+crank
Whatever you want that the FD can handle. Your sora shifters are probably optimized for the standard 39/53 so that would work, or a compact 30/46, or a mtb setup could work with some messing around.
>rd
whatever can cope with your 9s cassette.
>>
should I get a Domane AL5 Gen 4? 2k USD
>>
>>1995391
Good for entry level shit - but their touring range makes me lol.

Otherwise buying decent used.
>>
>buy $1400 bike
>still mostly ride the $20 beach cruiser that lives in the bushes in your backyard

I should've just bought drugs
>>
>>1995523
You have to do your own research with the chinks, check trace velo for reviews and shit

For your crank, I recommend you buy a used squAre taper Shimano set

For your derailleur, I recommend a new Acera.
>>
>>1995550
You went too far. $500 gets you a soulful old bike you'll love but won't miss, buying used.
>>
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What's a good allroad/gravel bike frameset for running 650x47b for under $1000? The lower price the better, means I can get a better groupset. I was looking at the Surly Midnight special but it seems pretty expensive for a steelie. Probably going to run 1x11. The Kona Rove LTD seems good too, I'm just wondering if anyone has good experiences with these or any other options
>>
>>1995538
just pointing out that this post is total bullshit. but I don't want to shill for decathlon so those who have a little bit of sense can judge for themselves
>>
>>1995523
>Can the chinks be trusted?
Chink here. Trust us as much as you can test us, or have others test for you. But there's more than enough shit that should work.

>>1995563
This is a good plan. But there's also enough new shimano and compatible stuff so don't neglect that.
>>
>>1995572
Sorry can't say, more of a 26in mtb guy.
>>
>>1995572
Posiden redwood is easily your best shot rn, there's a sale going on and you can get a new bike shipped for $500. All you really need to buy after that is a better saddle and tires.
>>
>>1994782
Less than geometry, but it's a strong indicator of quality and design philosophy. And most people can't read bike geometry.

>>1995050
At that price I see no reason to comrpomise.

>>1995369
Go higher in budget or go used.

>>1995391
They have some of the cheapest actual bikes around. They also have some complete fucking garbage so double check. Expect cut corners and weird specs. Like bikes direct but with less of a sense of humor.

>>1995572
Both those are maxway with premium paintjobs.
>>
>>1995604
if they're just generic frames and forks with nice paintjob, do you have any idea where I could get similar/same frames without the brand name? Shopping from SEA btw.
>>1995603
seems decent but not available where I'm at, and also want a few specific components so I was really looking for a frameset and not a complete bike
>>
>>1995617
Ye my bad mis read, a nice frame but fuck heavy
>>
>>1995535
bump :3
>>
>>1995604
>Less than geometry
this
>most people can't read bike geometry
geometry can be incredibly complex, being able to read a bike's geometric design is just the start, understanding the effects of changing those numbers is where it's complex but ultimately dictates the character of a bike more than the material it's built from
>>
Have used an FX2 Disc for a few years now and want something better with drop bars. 2k budget, wat do? Domanes seem nice
>>
>>1995391
Expect to switch the wheels on most of their bikes, but otherwise they're quite good for the price.
>>
>>1995761
Domane is a good choice. Hopefully you know this but do NOT get the ones with mech dicks
>>
>>1995445
Thanks anon. Yeah, commuter is generally different than MTB, so I'm more looking for a nice trail bike, just want something that I could use for a commute (mainly to help justify the upgrade), though I don't generally make a habit of it. I'll definitely check out my LBS for getting sized up, that's a good suggestion.
>>
I need thi sbike
>>
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>>1995853
>break me cage
>cable dicks
>>
I just want a typical aluminum 2x GRX gravel bike, budget is around 2000-2400€.
>mounts, racks, fenders
>tubeless ready/compatible wheels and tires
>clearance up to 42-45mm for studded winter tires with fenders
no weird shit like integrated cockpits or proprietary parts. I want to be able to tinker with the bike myself.

so far I've found these:
>Cannondale Topstone 2 2024
seems fine, but they have FSA cranks instead of GRX and things like that are putting me off.

>used trek checkpoint ALR5 2022 for 1900€
second owners get 3 year warranty insted of lifetime, praxis alba cranks.
>>
>>1995853
Cable dick on a bike that nice is SUS but people overstate their shortcomings IMO.
>>
>>1995867
I have 2 or 3 pairs of fsa cranks and I like them.
>>
>>1995535
>>1995761
Domane is an endurance road bike. So, faster and lighter and closer to a proper road bike than any commuter or cyclocross bike you guys are probably used to, but still not quite as fast/racey as a proper road bike (i.e. Madone, Emonda, Venge, Tarmac, etc). So if you want something that treads the line of being a fast light road bike but also with some emphasis on comfort for longer rides, Domane is a good option.
If you don't care about being fast/light but just want a road-style drop bar bike for city riding, adventures, commuting, etc then you'd be better off with a cyclocross-style bike.
And if you want a bike focused only on going fast, then either an aero road bike (i.e. Madone, Venge) if you live in a flat area or a lightweight road bike (i.e. Emonda, Tarmac) if you live in a hilly/mountainous area.
In my personal opinion I wouldn't want a Domane for myself because it feels pretty slow compared to a more proper road bike like a Madone, and if I want that slower comfy ride quality I'd go with something closer to a cyclocross bike, but that is entirely my personal preference, the Domane is a good bike for people who want that kind of bike. test ride before buying.
>>
>>1995770
Nothing wrong with mechanical discs. Less hassle to maintain than hydraulics. Hydraulics are only worth having on mountain bikes and/or bikes used for racing, in my opinion. They do perform better but just not necessary or worth the hassle for a road bike that won't be raced.
>>1995523
Better to ask in /bqg/. Sheldon Brown and Park Tool and topnigger.ueuo.com all have some info on chainring/crank/derailleur compatibility.
>>
>>1996247
t. retard
>>
>>1996250
>no argument
>>
>>1996247
I love mechanical discs. A budget mechanical will perform 100 times better than an hydraulic one, and for commuting and leisure they're always more reliable. I also find for road and gravel use you have more control on braking power. That's my opinion. I would go with hydraulic only for downhill.
>>
>>1996305
>Budget mechanical will perform better than hydraulic

Breh come on, this is completely false. The cheapest hydraulic is a fill step up from the best mechanical.

I will say, that set up properly a good mechanical is fine. But it's a lot of faff to get there only for it to still be worse than hydraulic, hence why everyone says to just get hydraulic it you're shopping around.
>>
>>1996305
I don't even know how this could be intended as a troll post, it's several layers of wrong beyond "not even wrong", what is the meaning of this?
>>
>>1996247
this board has really gone to shit
>>
>>1996305
>would you really just go on the internet and post lies?
seems so.
t. shimano mt200 ENJOYER
I am the opposite. I would go with cheap hydros over every cable disk setup. If you want less power/more modulation just go with smaller rotors or not 4pots.
>>
>5'8.5", 32" inseam for jeans
>new house
>bicycle path that goes directly to my office
>just want a nice simple commuter to get some exercise on
>snows a lot here so being able to go though snow on nicer days would be a plus
>under ~$500 used

I just wanna know what to look out for on FB marketplace to identify a quality bike, brands, features etc.
>>
>>1996754
Also I don't want a fixie, but also 18 or 21 speeds is excessive. Are 3 or 4 speeds a thing?
>>
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>>1996755
You’re getting into hub gears at that point, which can be obscure and expensive outside of Europe and Asia. You may find one, but probably not.
Try to track down a flat bar hybrid, it’ll be what you want. You’ll want to do some research into good brands, but general rule is, if a dedicated bike shop stocks the brand, it’s probably decent quality.
Make sure you read up on how to check a second hand bike before you do your first inspection. And make sure it fits you. Most manufacturers sites will give you an idea on your height vs the bike size. Never compose on fit, even if it’s a good deal.
>>
>>1996756
Can you just not have a 4 ring rear cassette and no front one?
Is it because the spread between each gear would be too large?
>>
>>1996767
Most hubs are modern, and that means cassettes.
An older cassette hub can take 8 speeds to 10 or 11. Newer ones take 11-13 or more in the future.
Old bikes run freewheels and you can get 5 speed or even 3 speed freewheels.

All you do is reduce the range the rear derailleur goes, so one of my bikes is a "10 speed" just because I am running a 5 speed freewheel instead of the factory 7 speed or 6.

You can also buy cassette spacers, then find a cassette that has loose cogs. Then install the spacers+loose cogs and run a custom 2,3,4 or whatever speed cassette.
>>
What are some bikes that might interest someone daily driving the hell out of a Size L B'Twin Riverside 120 since 2017/2018 around a typical Eastern European agglomeration? I'm approaching the point of frequent tube replacements due to punctures, and the need to potentially buy two new tyres with a harder compound to protect against punctures (given how thin the stock tyres are by now) on top of a new cassette/chain I'm starting to wonder if I should perhaps consider upgrading to something which can take more punishment in all-season all-terrain environments as opposed to just gravel/street environments (even if they got potholes and curbs plenty).

I've been more than satisfied with its comfort and utility for the price I got it from Decathlon (since long haul and calorie efficiency is my main concern) but I'm perhaps wondering if there's something more durable I could upgrade to. My biggest criticism of the bike would probably be the steering wheel becoming misaligned with the front wheel when going up steep surfaces or under heavy lateral loads, neither am I fan of the way it is attached given it is primarily fashioned out of PVC. So far my acquisitions for the bike over the years have been;

>new brake pads (x2)
>parking leg
>new shifter cable to replace a damaged one (might be damaged somewhere around 1st gear again after a recent crash for all I know)
>bottle holder
>35-45 700mm schrader valve tube (x5)
>some shitty wheel arches which are too flimsy or constantly scrape the real wheel (need to tie them down with zip ties)
>gel seat (this one is very comfy)

Kind of skeptical about putting in another $80-$120 on a sub-$320 bike for new tyres (which may wear out even faster or be cumbersome compared to the stock tyres for all I know) even if the new chain/cassette would at the very least would be worth considering after this long. More than once I've had the boys at my local Decathlon suggest I look into Mountain Bikes or Carbon fiber chassis/parts.
>>
>>1996841
>My biggest criticism of the bike would probably be the steering wheel becoming misaligned with the front wheel when going up steep surfaces or under heavy lateral loads, neither am I fan of the way it is attached given it is primarily fashioned out of PVC

The plastic piece is just a dust cap. There's nothing plastic about your steering.
You can fix that just by removing your stem, cleaning everything, and greasing on reassembly. It's not an inherent problem it's just due to poor assembly.

Actually you're not describing anything beyond basic maintenance. Replacing a bike because it needs new tires is insane.

You also seem to be describing that you like an efficient bike but you want something tougher (in what way even?). Those are diametrically opposite values. Which one do you want? A mountain bike certainly won't be more 'calorie efficient'. Carbon fibre parts won't do fucking anything aside from make your bike more -fragile- and marginally lighter at great cost.

Obviously you can get something that is faster and stronger simply by spending considerably more money and it will just be all round nicer but as for going for something categorically different I don't understand what you're even saying that you want and you haven't identified ANY real problems with your bike despite rambling almost as much as I am.

I suggest you service your headset and hubs (yourself) and buy new tires.
>>
should I get a checkpoint ALR5?
>>
>>1996955
if you specifically plan to ride gravel routes or tour on it, yes

otherwise just buy a Domane, or other disc road bike, which nowadays have wide gearing and fit wide tires.

Gravel bikes are redundant as allrounders.
>>
>>1996754
You got some long fucking legs dawg
>>
>>1996841
>>1996779
>You can also buy cassette spacers, then find a cassette that has loose cogs. Then install the spacers+loose cogs and run a custom 2,3,4 or whatever speed cassette.
Hack: use a punch to tap the rivets out of old cassettes and recover the cassette spacers, you'll never have to buy one again.

>>1996841
The costs to maintain it are high compared to the purchase price, but maintenance costs will be higher on a more expensive bike. I'm a wrench monkey at Decathlon, and that's why most people are put off by maintaining this bike: the low initial purchase vs the (entirely regular) maintenance cost, which leads to many people discarding the bike. The only possible difference would be not having to replace your rims eventually if you were to opt for a disc brake bike. That said, if you only wear through two pairs of brake pads and one pair of tires in three years, you're quite a way off from having to replace your rims. Use and maintain until your rims wear out I'd say.
>>
>>1996988
>Hack: use a punch to tap the rivets out of old cassettes and recover the cassette spacers, you'll never have to buy one again.
Good point
some even used to use 3 bolts to hold them together, next cassette I burn through I will save the spacers.
>>
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what can I change my 2x slx crankset for? I'm tired of this bullshit
>>
I am thinking about buying an e-bike because I fail to ride a regular bike as a fatty and it is demoralising to fail getting speed at flat surface and fail to climb minor hills plus my legs and thighs feel numb and tingling each time I ride

Any tips on a good e-bike?
>>
>>1997040
>plus my legs and thighs feel numb and tingling each time I ride
that doesn't sound right, I've never been fat, but numb and tingling is normally a sign of pressure on a nerve, which if it goes on too long can cause more serious problems. you're not going to escape that problem by getting a motor, because it's not caused by the effort of pedaling, it's probably saddle position and/or frame size and you might also be putting too much weight on the saddle and not enough on your hands and feet
>>
>>1997040
try the ebike thread?
>>
Are the B'Twin Trekking 9 Protect+ tyres any good? I'd like to make these last 5+ years because I'm fed up with punctures on my 6-7 year old factory tyres right now. I would get the Schalbe Marathon Plus tyres if they fit on my 28" wheels but it seems there are noen.
>>
>>1997190
Even as the decathlon shill in chief around here, I wouldn't suggest their tires. They seem super coarse and not reliable. Never tried em personally, but honestly reviews on their site don't seem enthusiastic. Get Schwalbe if you want em to last and be safe for punctures.
The marathon plus in 37-622 you want are on bike24 at same price https://www.bike24.com/p265567.html?sku=256483
>>
>>1997207
>37-622
I thought these wouldn't be compatible with my 28" 700x38 wheels so I chose not to acquire them, especially since the location had none on hand.
>>
>>1997210
These tyres are for their street/gravel bikes right? The etrto would be around 38-622 compared to the 37-622 Schwalbe tyres so it might be too wide from what I know.
>>
>>1997210
37 means that is just a "nominal" millimeter narrower than your ideal 38. In reality they are the same considering that every brand has a differend kind of real life width, and schwalbe is known for being a lil bit wider..
>>
>>1997210
37-622 is the same as 700x37
38-722 is the same as 700x38
>>
>>1997210
>>1997215
Based off what I'm reading the nearest spec Marathons' might be only 2mm wider at the bead, so they should still work on something like the Riverside 120 or whatever else the Trekking 9 700x38 Protect Plus tyres are likely going on. Chances are if the tyres haven't been used yet you might be able to return them.
>>
>>1997190
B'Twin are the lowest tier CST tires. Also look at sealant. I run with a mix of slime and stans on my commuter. Slime to keep the stans from drying out too fast, and stans to actually seal holes permanently enough.

>>1997040
>legs and thighs feel numb and tingling each time I ride
Fitament problem. Correct posture, saddle height, saddle. Add gloves. And go faster.

>>1996841
>>1996841
>B'Twin Riverside 120
>Eastern European agglomeration?
I'd start looking for a better bike, for whatever geometry and posture you want. Suspension only makes sense if you've got significant drops, more than a few cm. In the short term, the first thing you should adopt is MTB techiques for avoiding punctures. Probably sealant. Your rims probably won't accept tubeless.

As far as new bikes, why not try out a rigid or light hardtail MTB.
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>>1997215
I'll assume these won't fit on something like this >>1996841 then.
>>
Is a rockhopper expert for £779/£989? a decent deal or is there something better around or under the same price?
>>
I'm tempted to buy this bike.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQBdhBU3cRA
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>>1997227
thank you for the clear spacing and formatting, it really helps in making sense to all the bs you posted
>>
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I want to sell my bike, but I'm uncertain about this damage to the frame, and I am worried potential buyers will be too. I have ridden the bike for thousands of miles since it has sustained these injuries, and the knocking with a coin trick leads me to believe it is fine. What should I say to buyers?
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So a shop near me has a good deal on a nice (prestige name, high modulus carbon) gravel bike with the groupset swapped out for something less glamorous but still totally fine (I'd rather have a nice frame and good enough groupset than a shit frame and top end groupset, and I can't afford a top frame and a top groupset).

I'm not desperate for a third bike but I do intend to get one at some point, and I want something that's ROUGHLY in the same ballpark as my main bike (a road bike), so this could actually fit into my long term plans pretty well.

But here's the thing. I took it for a ride and while it felt really stable, it also felt a little unresponsive because of the ginormous knobby tires and cheaper wheels compared to my road bike, and flared meme bars. So it was hard to make an apples to apples comparison.

The geometry is in most ways extremely similar to my road bike. the main difference is chainstay is 15mm longer, everything else is within 2-3mm or less than 1 degree. Slightly longer headtube, slightly more stack. Oh and obviously quite a bit more tire clearance, though I don't really care about that (if anything it's less than ideal, I don't like big ass clumsy tires)

What I'm wondering is, aren't gravel bikes supposed to be all about low speed agility? On the one hand balance was piss easy at low speed, but the handlebars were really slow to turn and it felt like tight corners were something of a challenge. Why is the chainstay 15mm longer, with all else being about the same, if that's the case? Just for 40mm tires? What could I expect of it if I put my good wheels on it, and put the ok wheels on my new "third bike", like should I just assume the clumsy was from the tires/wheels and not the long chain stays?
>>
>>1997601
>within 2-3mm or less than 1 degree
Besides doubting this statement a degree in some areas makes a difference between night and day.
Sluggish. But you're saying the wheelbase is within 15 mm of your road bike, the trail is the same (since no one makes odd forks where the rake satisfies '2-3 mm' different from a 45mm fork rake) ? Post botg geos maybe ? One thing that could have ruined the habdling for you is setup. The same bike, or two identical bikes, can behave very different depending on where fit places your center of gravity and how pressure is distributed between front and rear.
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>>1997601
>What I'm wondering is, aren't gravel bikes supposed to be all about low speed agility? No, if anything gravel bikes are beyond "endurance" road bikes and are more slack. Some are slacker then old mtb's. cyclocross bikes are the ones (I think) that were designed for slow speed agility, and my ritchey swiss cross seems to fit that realm, but I mostly ride quick vintage road bikes.
>On the one hand balance was piss easy at low speed, but the handlebars were really slow to turn and it felt like tight corners were something of a challenge.
It's easier to balance with more relaxed angles, handlebars are slow to turn because of heavy wheels+tires. Wide bars would help, but "wide" for road users is like 46cm, not 650+ like mtbers run.
>Why is the chainstay 15mm longer, with all else being about the same, if that's the case?
Comfort, tire clearance, less twitchy design focus. Longer chainstays flex more and are inherently more comfortable, while generally required for larger tires. They also improve descending comfort due to reducing twitchiness. This is why DH mtb's are "long and low" for maximum speed.
>Just for 40mm tires? What could I expect of it if I put my good wheels on it, and put the ok wheels on my new "third bike", like should I just assume the clumsy was from the tires/wheels and not the long chain stays?
It will be quicker, but we aren't going to know how much, and how much you can feel.

Maybe ask the bike shop owner if you could do a demo ride with your nice wheels(if everything matches) and off X amount of money before you buy? Admittedly I haven't done much demoing, but I remember a long time ago just riding around the parking lot I noticed how one mtb was way slacker then another, and that wasn't great in the parking lot but now I know it would be better for descending.
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>>1997560
"has some scratches and dents", pictures show them all.
I have ridden X miles and it has been fine.

That's what I would do, be open about it.
Sometimes I see frames for sale that are FUCKED, and later on I always see the descriptions added in about the damage. Presumably because someone was interested, asked, and then bailed/low balled.
>>
>>1997601
>What I'm wondering is, aren't gravel bikes supposed to be all about low speed agility?
No. It's mostly marketing. The geometry is all over the fucking place on those. Take anon's advice on another demo with good wheels.


>>1997607
This is the way. Even if the frame is fucked, you might get someone who wants key parts.
>>
Any reason I shouldn't go buy this for ~$300?

There's not many used gravel bikes available around here rn
>>
Did I do good for $325 bros?
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>>1997757
>>1997986
Well, it's done have fun now!
>>
I need a cheapest gravel bikel that meets all these requirements:
- aluminum frame and fork
- thru-axles front and rear
- one-by drive train
- derailleur with a clutch
- hydraulic brakes
Chinese bikes or components are fine too as long as they meet the requirements from the list.
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>>1998266
Muriga, eu, UK or down under?
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>>1998276
EU, but I have no issues with ordering if it's reasonable.
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>>1998279
Dude there's literally nothing with all your specs. You should reconsider at least the hydraulic brakes
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>>1998320
Carbon fiber frame and fork are fine as well, but I think they are too expensive here. Well I will do as I thought but just ordering the parts off aliexpress and making my own bike.
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>>1998266
Check posiden website, they're still selling redwoods for $500 of you're the right size. All you gotta do is buy some chink ltwoo hydro groupset and you'll be at like $600.
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>>1998633
I've checked. Is this what americans call a gravel? Because in the rest of the world it is called a fucking fat-bike.
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>>1998633
By the way, I asked about a 29", not a 27.5" toddler bike.
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>>1998643
>wagon wheel posting
>>1998641
sir.... fat bikes have 4.0in tires. OTOH that is bordering rigid mtb territory with how large the knobs are.
Anything over 50mm with large knobs is a mtb.
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>>1998641
>>1998643
Well first off, rude as fuck. Second it's literally normal ass MTB tire sizes. Third you did not specify tire sizes. Fourth you can still put 700c wheels in there. Fifth your requirements are niche and retarded. Sixth fuck you I was trying to help you, you moose
>>
I currently have no bike, but have moved to an area with amazing bikability.

I think it would be best to buy a bicycle in person, at a store that will also service and maintain the bike.

I am looking for a hybrid, due to a broken wrist a few years ago I can't use the road bike style handles and positioning comfortably.

The brands in my area of Korea are
Samchully (local brand)
Alton
Trek
Giant

Decathlon is only in the capital city, and that's on the other side of the country from me.

I'm looking to spend roughly $1000. I intend to ride a 6km journey to work daily, and then use it for recreational and fitness riding on the weekends on the beautiful "bike path of death" by the Taehwa River. The name was given to the path 20 years ago when it was an ecological disaster, but now it's a beautiful nature reserve with otters, ferrets, raccoon dogs and many water birds.

Took at look at the new FX3 2024 with Cues 1x10, and the other Trek models. The trek people are very friendly and helped me maintain my old bicycle before it was destroyed when I moved

Thankyou for coming to my tedX talk, please subscribe to my only fans
>>
>>1998687
is your bussy on onlyfans?
>>
total newfag here.
where can i buy a cheap bike in cologne?
im willing to go used if someone can tell me what to look for cause i know jack shit.
>>
Oh my Gorn...
>>
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Would this be a good bike for a triathlon? I am doing a sprint in August, and this will be the first bike I've ever gotten. It's a 2008 Cannondale Slice, and maybe a little bit big for me? I would have to see the fit in person, but the seller is asking for $400.
It doesn't come with pedals or water bottle holders, to my dismay. The seller said that I could, for $50, "add the Mavic Power-tap wheel that comes with the Power tap computer head". I don't really know what that means, but I like training with data and feel like I'd probably be interested in it. I definitely want to measure cadence somehow.
Also, would this be good for winter training? I live in Chicago, so I can't go outside in the winter to bike. I would probably use MyWhoosh or whatever, but then I'd have to get some sort of indoor trainer, right?
I don't understand how all of this works so if you could help me out that'd be much appreciated. Right now I've been biking on the spin bikes in my gym, where I can connect my heart rate monitor and see my cadence.
>>
>>1999823
Fit matters the most. How tall are you, and get your cycling inseam too(stand against wall with no shoes, stick hard book against your taint tight, then measure from your taint/book interface to the ground). Tri-bikes have kinda a funky fit so the bike frames are smaller then a normal road bike but still fit due to the aero bar risers, and generally pushed forward seating position.
Do some research on bike fit, and learn about what size will fit you.

Did some research on the mavic power tap. It's basically a wired computer and if it comes with the wiring harness, head, and wheel that should be enough.
Here is a thread I found with 0 effort searching
https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=105871

You can winter train on any bike if you get a trainer that fits on the back. Spin bikes at the gym are more of a exercise machine, then riding a bicycle. However if you are good on the spin bike it will help. Particularly if you got good at using different muscles on the spin bike, that technique is paramount when riding long distances since you can use say your hamstrings and let your quads rest, then use your glutes and quads, then your calves, etc.
Any road bike can be used at a triathlon, just that aero bikes with aero bars are faster, like the one you posted. However if the bike is way too big, or way too small a better fitting bike would be faster instead.



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