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/bbg/ Bike Building General
"I'm not paying Park for a fucking bike stand, or cleaning my shed" Edition.

A place to ask questions, and to share tips & resources. Post your projects, your finished & in-process builds, restorations, etc.


Resources:
Barnett's Bicycle Repair Manual - https://www.flwlib.org/DocumentCenter/View/2461/Bike-Repair
UCSB Associated Students Bike Shop Manual (2022) - https://bikeshop.as.ucsb.edu/files/2021/08/AS-BIKE-SHOP-WEB-MANUAL.pdf
Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Technical Info - https://www.sheldonbrown.com/
Bike parts, tools, etc. - https://www.universalcycles.com/

Chinkshit:
https://www.aliexpress.com/category/200010436/bicycle-repair-tools.html
https://www.aliexpress.com/category/1222/bicycle-parts.html

>Bike Questions General >>>/n/bqg
>Wheels General >>>/n/wg
>Bike Apparel General >>>/n/bag
>Post Your Bike Thread>>>/n/pybt
>>
>>1991676
Finished brazing a cromoly frame together couple months ago, ended up at 5 pounds.
>>
>>1991708
did you use acetylene? i have been looking into doing this and it's kind of expensive to get the tanks/gas. plus you are probably going to have to build a few before you can get it down right.
>>
>>1991722
Acetylene is better, but you can use some smaller torches, as long as your making a lugged bike. It would be stupid to fillet braze with something like propane.
>>
>>1991467
>How hard would it be to manufacture my own bike frame?
Broad question. There are so many variables--your idea, your skills, what tools you have, etc.
I'd say it ranges from "a fair bit of work" to "really quite difficult". It's a bit like having an idea for a website or program, and saying "I don't do programming though".

>>1991469
If you're brand new, the easy thing to do is copy something good.

>wouldn't the lugs determine the geo
In general yes. There are different sets, for various tubing diameters, different angles, etc.
The lug supplier will either have a drawing of the angles/dimensions, or a listing of them that you can plug into something like BikeCAD. Super useful if you're building a traditional 'diamond' frame.

The amount of clearance/wiggle room depends on what alloy you're using for the joint, but it will be a tiny number. Something like .002-.006. A piece of copy paper is ~.004.
If you're gonna bend something... it's gonna be the tubes.

>now that you can weld the tubes instead of braize them to lugs
This was one of the big changes in the cycling world. If you look through ancient mtb catalogs, for a while the lower tier stuff was lugged & brazed, the higher tier stuff welded or fillet brazed. Because the latter option was much more freeform wrt to tubing lengths, angles, etc when people were really experimenting with what worked well.

You both seem interested in the topic, check out some of this guy's videos. This recent one is specifically about kind of a half & half technique, where you sorta get the look, but aren't locked into set angles, etc.
Bilaminate Construction on a BICYCLE HEADTUBE // paul brodie's shop
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uK9yeHU14rk
>>
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this was the worst financial decision of my life
>>
>>1991731
what do frame builders use to cut and cope the tubing for filet brazing? are they doing it by hand with a bandfile, or do they use a hole saw in a jig or something?
>>
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I’ve been looking into the idea of welding/brazing disc brake mounts to an old GT bravado steel frame.
Most conversions seem to add ISO-tabs, but since flat mount calipers are both more available and also sleeker I’d wanna go with that if possible. Is the chainstay strong enough to handle it without a brace? 140 or 160mm discs.

Since a flat mount conversion would put the caliper between chain and seatstay, a brace right next to it would maybe help a little, but the braking force would ofc be centered right at the mounting spot.

I’ve seen it done, but maybe it’s a bad idea?

Not my frame in picture, but one just like it
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wee
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>>1991750
>>
holy shit this is the first time ive seen this board and the catalog has 5 bike threads and i need bike advice
i got an old dutch steel bike (literally made in 1984, no joke) for free from some old dutch people and it hasnt been riden for a decade. the goal is to restore it to a single speed with panniers and rim brakes. any tips?
>>
>>1991766
your'e dutch. throw it in a canal and steal a new one
>>
>>1991772
no im australian. theres no bikes around to steal and i would certainly get in trouble for it. it was shipped here and put in their garden as a feature piece until they gave it to me
>>
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>>1991745
It's gonna be a lot of work either way and probably require bracing. Personally I wouldn't even bother and just put a disc brake fork on the frame and keep a decent V-brake at the rear, stopping power is 70% front brake anyway.
>>
>>1991778
Yeah I figure, though I don't mind putting in the work if I know a good result is achievable.

I don't plan to ride it super hard or anything, so V-brakes would surely be enough. I just wanna build a cool looking bike with modern components on the frame I like
>>
>>1991728
yeah i was thinking about mapp for small stuff, i wanted to try brazing stuff on my bike, but yeah, propane definitely wouldn't get hot enough for that.
>>1991742
ohh, i wasn't sure. i found out there is a welding supply place near me so i'll have to ask before i pick some up second hand.
>>
>>1991780
Build a mullet, with disc front and rim back.
>>
>>1991911
isn't the front like 80% of your braking power anyway? I'm always using the front brake by itself, but tend to only use the back brake in conjunction with the front, for quick stops.
>>
>>1991911
If you do this make sure you get a mechanical disc brake at the front (fuck fluids btw) and a V-brake at the rear so you can use matching long pull brake levers, or if you insist on a cantishit rear brake for hipster meme points use brake levers that can be adjusted between long pull and short pull.
>>
>>1991745
put it on top of the seat stay near the dropouts, mig is just fine
>>
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>>1991760
bought this piece of crap for the fenders, basket, and rack.
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>>1992042
$10 bike. was gonna throw it away after i pulled all the stuff off
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>>1992043
but i never had a klunker before, so i assembled this piece of shit
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>>1992042
i-is that a blood?
>>
>>1992187
im not good at this
>>
what tool can i get to unfuck my bb threads?
>>
>>1992300
Get a hacksaw and cut a slot in the o.d. threads of the BB cartridge then use it like a die to slowly chase the threads. Only go a little at a time then back off. The slot gives a place for the chips to go. Use oil, too.
>>
>>1992303
thanks for the tip bro. i sorted it tho. turns out the new bb just had shit threads

fuck the chinks, sometims.
>>
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Cracked wheel discs, 35 year old plastic that hasn’t gone super brittle, but it was never flexible to begin with
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>>1992454
Automotive wiring harness tape, it’s like hockey tape but more sticky and a finer weave. So it’s super flexible and sticks to anything pretty well.
Fits around these curves where the cracks are great. It’s not permanent, but nothing short of super glue would be, and I don’t want to potentially fuck that up.
I might basically put a backing layer on both disc sides, like a big vinyl sheet or something, just to give it some more support
>>
>>1992455
nice. i wonder if plastic welding with zip ties would be feasible, or if the stock is too thin, or a different type of plastic. size those holes and when you do your final fix you can just cover those small holes and redrill them out instead of fiddling with trying to shape or cut around them.
>>
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>>1992464
The other idea I was thinking of for them is to reinforce the wear points and edges. Basically wrap aluminum rings around the valve hole, then the inside and outside edges, and bond washers to the bolt holes. This stuff is too thin to involve heat, it would warp immediately.
This is distinctly for show, this isn’t an everyday ride, but I just want them to be a bit more secure for peace of mind.
They’re designed to be somewhat compliant so my other concern is say I cut some aluminum U trim to fit the rim of the disc, and that extra rigidity actually leads to failure.
>>
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>>1992465
the original setup for that is so cool despite the gimmicks. I had one that I had to modify a bit for a shorter friend, the stem was like 140mm and weighed 500 grams lol. Looks pretty racy with my saddle height. Beautiful frame, I love the wishbone.
>>
>>1992513
Yeah this one is a bit small on me, it’s a 19” frame and I’m best on 20-21”, so the low and forward thing is amplified a lot.
The melon Marin above is 21” and fits me great
But it absolutely rips anyway, and looks super cool. We don’t have these in the US so it’s definitely a unique one to be riding around
>>
>>1992518
I forgot this isn’t the post your bike thread
Melon Marin >>1992163
which also needed a lot of work, I got that thing in a really sorry state but it cleaned up very nice
>>
>>1991676
any idea on building a nice diy bike stand?
>>
>>1992580
I would check used first
>>
Is it practical to get a hand torch type thing to braze a few lugged frames together? I’m assuming welding is too much up front cost for just a few frames, and I can’t imagine I’d get skilled at it anyway.
>>
>>1992948
That's the reason bikes of the past were lugged and brazed until it became profitable to mass produce welded bikes. The bigger issue will be a frame jig
>>
you'll want an oxy/acetylene mix. it's a few hundred dollars. you'll need to buy a torch, some tips, and then go get a bottle of gas and air at a supply house. then of course you'll need a ton of other tools. i'd acquire things slowly and cheaply via facebook, flea markets, yard and estate sales.
>>
>>1992956
That’s encouraging, thank you.
>>
>>1992948
For a few bike frames, a used tig vs oxy acetylene are somewhat comparable. You can do lots of other things with both of them aside from making bikes, depends on what way you want to make bikes and what else you would do with the tools.
>>
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I'm not paying $25 for this.
>>
this old reflector will do
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>>1993182
nice
>>
cut it down
>>
take your time so you get a good, even cut kek
>>
let's pretend like we're not in the bush league
>>
that'll do
>>
this paint has seen a few presidents
>>
and now we wait
>>
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gonna need these. i really need to buy a set of tap and dies.
>>
tenatively calling this a success. i'll eventually tap and slot it so it's not a pain in the ass every time i need to change a brake cable. fuck you amazon.
>>
>>1993197
Brilliant
>>
>>1993197
there is a diy bike hacks thread fyi
>>
>>1993436
yeah let's further splinter content on the board that gets 12 visitors a day
>>
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I got this 1982 Miyata 610 from the original owner yesterday, fifty bux.
A touring bike, mid spec in the range. The seller said when he bought it the bike shop guy talked him into some upgrades, so it has the same derailers & shifters that came with the 1000. It also has a double instead of a triple. Said he never rode it much, and I believe him.

The marks on the rear dropouts say the rear skewer was clamped down twice, hardly any scuffs on the fd, etc. The ancient tires are rotten, but still have the little bit of rubber flash, where the molds met. Must have rode it very little.

This is gonna to be a replacement for my old 'old ten speed fixed gear', and it's good for that. The rear is 120mm, the shift mounts & derailer cable guides are the band/removable type, and the rest of the dimensions fit 1980s Japanese stuff, nothing odd.
The previous one I wrecked in 2022--bent the steerer tube, top tube, down tube, RIP. So everything comes off this, and parts from the wrecked bike go on. I'll keep a few bits, at least the derailers, shifters.

Not a great pic, but I rarely remember to take one before disassembly. The white sheet is a sewing machine cover, keeps the dust off.
>>
>>1993916
neat. are those suntour cyclone derailleurs? I have one of those cranks, the logo looks similar
>>
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>>1992580
>building a nice diy bike stand?
Does 'nice' mean 'looks good' or 'works'?
I'm gonna assume you think something like a Park stand is too expensive for what it is. There's two cheap ideas that I've seen, that I think are reasonable.

1st, if you have an exposed rafter (garage, porch, basement, etc), you can just use a piece of string. Either loop the string over, or use an eye bolt, etc. One at the saddle, one at the handlebars.
I think most people dislike this, because it's not absolutely fixed/your bike can swing a bit. Kind of the formal version of hooking the nose of your saddle over a tree branch.

2nd really cheap way is to make a tubing block, like what you'd use to hold tubes when building a frame. Tends to be some kind of hardwood, where you bore out the correct size hole (holesaw, auger, forstner bit), then saw the block in half & put a 'hinge' on it, usually a bit of leather. Then you clamp this block to/in something.
It's low-tech, but assumes you have some round tube on your bike (seatpost?) to put it on. Not my pic.

I used to ride with a guy, he had one of those basement screw jack pillars, and he made a block to fit the pillar, one to fit his seatpost, and used two wood clamps. There's a bit more to it, but you get the idea. He was 6'3", and the ergonomics were surprisingly good.
>>
>>1993930
leather flap was smart.
>>
>>1991676
jewwww white Chinese, the shit hole racist pedo American white pigs, experience Pearl Harbor again and be slaughtered and exterminated!

from japan
>>
>>1993916
Those shifters look caveman, what are they?
>>
>>1994336
what do you mean? they're just clamp on dt shifters. look like arx shifters i had once, but i'm sure they're probably cyclone or something based on the rd.
>>
>>1994355
They look way chunkier around the barrel then any other DT shifters I've seen, but that may be a quirk of the photo. I agree they're probably early Cyclone.
>>
>>1991728
This is a bogus claim. I use oxy ace but using oxy propane or literally any other oxy fuel setup gets you there. If I didnt happen to have the oxy ace setup I wouldnt have gone the ace route and would have opted for oxy propane instead because theres not a single reason not to. But alot of upsides, handling, safety, cost, sometimes even law.
So yeah, explain why oxy propane would be inferior for brazing. Protip: You cant.
>>
>>1991743
cut at the correct angle, use a half round file (they are 25 mm and 30 mm here) to get you close and a smaller half round or round file to get bang on. Other than that use anything, ive adopted a shaper and at another time a pantograph copy mill to make it faster and easier work but alwwys followed up with a hand file. Because you got to piss with the cock you have.
>>
>>1994388
>Because you got to piss with the cock you have.
kek
>>
The Paterek Manual.pdf
https://files.catbox.moe/itiykq.pdf

The Proteus Framebuilding Book.pdf
https://files.catbox.moe/o4d2qf.pdf

here's a bonus for you all
Joe Friel - The Cyclist Training Bible [Scan by yazper].pdf
https://files.catbox.moe/iiloff.pdf
>>
>>1994553
Thank you. I forgot framebuilding was a thing when I made this thread.
>>
>>1994554
I just recently remembered I had those books deep in my archive and need to share it, really interesting information even if you or I or anon never build a bike, there's some really deep topics discussed there
>>
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>>1994560
i got like 3gb of crap i've hoarded, but it was grabbed via automation, so there's a bunch of cringe titles sprinkled in. i'll rar it and upload it if anyone wants.
>>
oh the difference between bearingprotools press compared to chinkshit one
also wind-out puller such a nice thing to have
no hammering needed
>>
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>need new wheels
>tires at ~15% life, might as well get new tires
>since my brakes are seizing from corrosion I might as well upgrade the brakes too
>recently replaced sprocket and chain
>I better deep clean the chain while I'm at it
Alright, smoke break is over, going back to work, I'm only about halfway through
>>
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oh yeah baby these brake calipers are unnecessarily extra lol, also 28mm continental granprix all-rounders mount to 29.4mm on archetypes, 0.6mm smaller than continental's tire that's one segment down, the grandsport race which mounted to 30.0mm. I can't compare the tires since I haven't taken the bike out yet
>>
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>fubi fixie bike patented design
how hard would it be to recreate this myself?
>>
>>1993916
>rest of the dimensions fit 1980s Japanese stuff, nothing odd
Oops, the headset was JIS, and I only had ISO ones laying around.
Tange MA60, looked kind of cool, rinko style, but it had little spots of rust on the chrome. It's one of those things, you can temporarily clean it up, but the plating is compromised and it will always re-rust. Had to order one.

>>1993921
Yeah, it's a pair of Cyclone Mk-II derailers, FD-2300 & RD-3700. I quite like them.
They're well made, the specs work for me, and they look good. I think that checks all the boxes.

>have one of those cranks
Old SR cranks, 'Super Custom' on the side, but that sounds fancier than what they are. This is before 110/74 won out, so the rings are an obsolete size, 118.
I'll see how they polish up, and maybe put them in the bin for later ss/fixed use.

>>1994336
Suntour Superbe LD-2000 is the part number. Just simple friction shifters (no ratchet mechanism).

>>1994355
Quite similar. They work fine, but have that 70s styling, with the decorative little metal dimples. Nothing special. I much prefer the ones that came out just a few years later, with the thin, flat, smooth levers.
I'll cut the band apart to free up the stop washers, so they become normal dt shifters.

>>1994382
I guess you're talking about the nut & bolt on the back side of the band.
>>
>>1993916
what year, 81 or so ?
>>
>>1995135
oops, 82 i see...
i've got an 85 - super comfy.
>>
I want to strip the paint off my bike and I want a bare steel frame. Pic related, it's the bike I got 4 years ago. Rides extremely well, upgraded it, hate the name/frame colour, etc etc...

I want to know if I can do it myself, what tools/chemicals I need, and what kind of stuff I need to protect the frame?

Is this something I should get paid to be done (e.g.: sandblasting), or can I do it myself? I need tools to take off the crown, BB and other stuff as well, anything I can use to improvise here?

Cheers.
>>
>>1995226
Don't do it it's a beautiful bike. Expecially if you don't have another bike. Just ride. The bare steel it's particularly stupid. If you have money just buy one from those dresden hipsters or do it on a pos used bike.
It's a good idea only because you'd learn everything on assembling a bike. You'd need a lot of tools that you can't improvise.
>>
>>1995226
It’ll look shit unless it’s professionally polished and coated, and I doubt you’ll find anyone who can do that. You’ll end up with a dirty brown rusty pole if you try to strip it.
>>
>>1995243
>>1995244

I wasn't expecting these answers, but I respect it.

The reason for wanting to change the paint is to mainly get rid of the stupid "SERIOUS" logo on the side (trust Germans to do branding right?). The green, meh, I can take it or leave it. But one thing that pisses me off to no end is that they put a thick clear lacquer ON TOP of the stickers, which makes removal a nightmare.

Right now I don't have the tool/space/time - so I guess I'm stuck with it.

What about just removing components and buying a new frame? Would that be a better idea?
>>
>>1995301
Good steel frames can get pretty expensive, but yeah that's an option if you know what you're doing. I just recently bought a new frame and moved all my parts over.

Personally I've wanted to see someone buy a Tsunami frame.
>>
>>1995301
They put clear over the stickers to preserve them. BITD many italian bikes didn't have clear over the stickers(looking at you pinarello) and many of them just fell off which was a bad look.
>why so SERIOUS?
Could also make a joke(r) reference out of it

Personally, I find I don't mind whatever color a bike is after I ride it long enough. However if you still hate it would be easier to frame swap, but you could diy repaint. It just probably won't look as nice up close, and take way too much time.
>>
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>>1991676

What carbon frame for a gravel build?

- accommodates 29" 2.3" tyres

- frame works OK with a front suspension fork

- boost hub spacing
>>
>>1995322
bro just get a mountain bike at that point
>>
>>1995322
that's a mountain bike.
>>
>>1995309
>I've wanted to see someone buy a Tsunami frame.
there's a guy here who bought a single speed frame from them, he was posting regularly but not in a while. he was happy with it, usually people would ask him when they saw it. Australian, so the shipping wasn't as bad

>>1995301
a lot of the cost is stripping the frame and then rebuilding after it's painted . either you pay someone to do it or you do it. it's a huge project. so is the paint, but you could sand the paint to get it into a rough surface and rattlecan spray it and clear if you want. I would. the idea is keeping the old paint and just surfacing it is like using it for primer. there's a guy who posted this very thing a few days ago, maybe in the build thread? red white and blue frame became black and pink fade.
whereas a pro job, they'll strip off the paint, give it a special wash, prime, wet sand, paint, decal, clear, rebuild the bike, and it starts at $1200. shit, maybe they don't even do the unbuilding or rebuilding. also there may not be a shop near you that does it at all.
>>
>>1995315
>Personally, I find I don't mind whatever color a bike is after I ride it long enough.

I'm the opposite, unless I love the bike, I want to change asap cos I get tired of things. And being autistic, having a crap paint job would be upsetting.

>They put clear over the stickers to preserve them.
No idea what for. Literally no one has heard of sERiOus, and they are generally viewed as some knock-off brand. Surprisingly my series of touring bikes was pretty well put together, and now is quite a performer with all the necessary upgrades. I just think the paint is bringing it down.

>>1995347
I can't find that guy's post.

>$1200
That sounds realistic, I live in Swedecuckistan where any kind of hired specialised jobs are charged through the ass. For that price I can get a Thorn/VSF/ touring frame easily, or even get a custom one built.

The problem with a frame swap is what to do with the old one. I suppose someone could buy it as a cheapish steel gravel frame, but I would get near fuck all for it.

I think my next move is to get quotes, do some research into someone else doing it, cos I dont have the space/time means for it.
>>
>>1995352
Do bike wraps exist?
>>
>>1995352
>I can't find that guy's post
here he is
>>1993873
you can follow the links on it, he's posted several more times, including the current final post. I'm sure he could walk you through it
>>
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This thing is now 1x7
Old deore lx m560 cranks, 113mm bb, and a 42t origin8 chainring
>>
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>>1995375
The cranks cleaned up super nice, though my diy black touch up paint on the wear areas was a bit blobby, it works, it’s just gonna wear again anyway
>>
>>1995375
Not a fan of the 1x but completely understand swapping the original cranks, bike probably lost almost a kilo with that change.
>>
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Any references on Csepel steel frames? They are cheap (sub 200€ new) and have interesting options.
>>
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>>1995381
>>
>>1995356
Hmmm... they do, but they suffer from looking like shit, and they are notoriously difficult to put on.

>>1995368
Cheers.
>>
>>1995381
Can you put fenders and a rack on this?
>>
>>1995382
You can't legally buy negros anymore anon.
>>
>>1995398
Sure
>>
>>1995398
ya you can see the brazed-on eyelets for them on the dropouts front and rear
>>
anyone ever smooth out nicks and gouges on cranks with a 1"x30" belt sander or is there too much risk of removing too much material?
>>
>>1995410
I hand sanded a bunch of scrapes and dings out of my alu cranks. probably started with 80 grit or so, worked the grits down to steel wool and then aluminum polish from the auto store.
a belt sander would work for the initial go if you were careful I'm sure but I'd start with 120 grit since its going to annihilate the metal much easier. I'd probably hand sand the finer grits since you're not trying to remove material at that point, just smoothing it out .
>>
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>>1995410
I sanded both crank arms down with some heavy 120 grit sandpaper. There were some massive scratches and the NDS has like 1cm of heel wear so these shimano 600 cranks were kinda toast.
After the 120 I thought it looked cool and since the bike was really rough I left it and it's fine.

Also used dupli color chrome spray on both chainstays since the OEM chrome finish was roasted. I can tell, anyone can tell but it doesn't bother me too much and it's better then the rust, or black splotches it had.
>>
>>1995455
>faggin' up the thread
lol
>>
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Converting MTB to drop bar - BAD IDEA ???

I have a carbon MTB, 29" wheels and basic Rockshox fork. The wheels are boost spacing and I did spunk some money on them last year.

Gravel frame with boost spacing are practically non-existent - can I use my existing frame or will the geometry be all fucked up? It's a 54cm frame, with a 110mm stem and I am about 5ft10/11.

I was considering this handlebar; https://redshiftsports.com/products/top-shelf-handlebar-system but there might be better options specifically catered toward MTB conversions.

I'd either splash the cash on a mechanical GRX 1x12, or do a Frankenstein GRX 10-speed setup with my existing AdventX drivetrain.
>>
>>1995751
Great idea, although it would be nice have a look at that geometry just for the sake of it, see if you can find it on bikeinsights.
But honestly I see no problems, what's the worse that could happen? A more upright stance combined with the comfort and feel of drop bars? I love it, it's the whole point of this kind of setups. But maybe you could feel cramped, that's up to you. That 110m stem baffles me though, it's a lot... is that the one you intend to mount with drops, or the one you're currently using with flats?
This handlebar with that rise seems nice. If that's what you want, a little bit of rise, I don't think there's many of them. But if you already have a nice stack height than that rise could also be too much...
>>
>>1995751
It's fine. Just costs some money and you will be more aero/setup for faster less techy rides.

I run 1 old mtb for road/gravel work and I just use narrow mtb bars. Like 600mm or so.
>>
>>1995751
drop bar conversion adds a huge amount of reach
>>
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>>1995757
>>1995762
>>1995764

I might give the Surly Corner Bar a shot, I can keep my existing MTB shifters. As far as reach goes I can always swap the stem. I'm kind of a contrarian weirdo so chances are the geometry will feel perfect rather than strange.

I just want to freshen up this MTB, yes flat vs drop bar is kind of pointless for weekend trail riding.
>>
>>1995784
>I'm kind of a contrarian weirdo
I relate.
here is another whack bar
https://velo-orange.com/collections/alt-bars/products/granola-moose-bars?variant=39251736854703
>>
>>1995784
not for me thanks, either a wide, flared dropbar or a flatbar with a nice backsweep, that thing look like a wrists and shoulder killer
>>
How you get this off?
>>
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>>1995917
You need a hook spanner
>>
>>1995921
Damn. Worried about that. How much and where can I get it?
>>
>>1995922
try google, dum dum. or just douse it in penetrant, wedge a flat-head in there, and tap it with a hammer.
do you need instructions on how to wipe your ass, too?
>>
>>1995924
Yeah. Shitty, bullshit invented shameless cash in standards make me like that. And fuck me for thinking all these bike nerds might know where to not get ripped off, or used the most broken, bottom came in worthless "search engine" on the planet, you stupid goddamn faggot bitch....
>>
>>1995926
>you stupid goddamn faggot bitch....
you're the moron unable to intuit how to get a lockring off.
have a nice life, loser
>>
>>1995926
anon told you how to take it off without the special tool, in fact you could do almost all work on a bike without special tools, you just increase you likelihood of fucking it up more, especially since bike parts have to balance durability with weight so many parts are surprisingly fragile
> just douse it in penetrant, wedge a flat-head in there, and tap it with a hammer
you're probably going to fuck it up real bad if you can't intuit how like that anon said though
>>
>>1995924
>hook spanner
>>1995931

Not that guy asking the question, but I just did a google search for it and it doesn't show up if you ask for a hook spanner. Lol.

https://www.parktool.com/en-us/product/crank-and-bottom-bracket-wrench-hcw-5
>>
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>>1995926
he literally just told you how to do it with common tools you bitchnigger

And those things are the opposite of shameless cash in standards, most people don't use the 'correct' tool, I have several hook spanners and they usually will only engage with one prong and only work with a relatively loose lockring.

I use pic rel but a screw driver + hammer works too
>>
>>1995926
you can also use a vice, but i would be incredibly surprised if you weren't notools
>>
>>1995935
'bicycle hook spanner'
>>
>>1995936
I have the douglas branded version of this style of channellocks and I hate them.
>>
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is it normal for side pull caliper brakes to make you want to kill yourself trying to get them to stay centered and applying brake force evenly or is that just a problem with cheaper ones? also are there any that make adjusting the angle of the pads not miserable? i can't fucking stand dealing with my bike's brakes and i'll gladly replace them if i can be less annoyed
>>
>>1995949
Single or dual pivot? Does the brake have a centering screw? How true are your wheels?
>>
>>1995952
single pivot; no centering screw; they're still very true
>>
>>1995953
Yeah single pivot are a huge pain in the ass, I've never been able to centre them properly, then keep them centred. I've moved my bikes to dual pivot Tekro R559 for that reason.
>>
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>1995924
>1995928
>1995931
>1995936
>1995937
>Why would I be helpful, when I could be RUDE...

>>1995917
I have several hook wrenches, and those Hozan pliers, but the other day I had to resort to a hammer & punch for a headset lockring similar to yours.
Either my tools didn't match the curve (pin slips), or the pattern was wrong (no opposed notches).
Always makes me feel dirty to take a hammer to something on a bike though. Even for smacking out bearings on a shouldered axle, etc.
And since none of the ruders mentioned it--the lockring is very likely left hand/reverse thread.

>>1995935
'Spanner' is the cute British word for 'wrench'. Wait until you hear what they call vise grips/locking pliers.

>>1995942
These Knipex ones have replaced my tongue and groove pliers & adjustable wrenches. Get them when Menards has a bag sale. They're so good.
The jaws are smooth and close parallel, so they don't mangle anything. I used these the other day to take out a bb fixed cup, even though I have the special tool somewhere (in the very bottom of my toolbox... probably).
The manufacturer claims "10x your grip strength", and I believe it.

Those little wire cutters are serious business too. A brand new pair, because I took the other ones to work.
...I had all of these tools laying out because I'm doing a round robin thing with four bikes right now.
The ugly truth is that I was keeping a bike that was too small for me. And I'm finally swapping out.
>>
>>1995956
enGraved Is My Pepper
>>
>>1995949
normal. they center AFTER they make contact with the wheel. one side will always want to grab before the other, but functionally this doesn'tr eally matter.
>>
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>>1995956
i like cobras ok, but i still like old school tongue and groove the best.
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>>1995953
if you don't have one of those thin spanners that can turn the wrench flats on the bit between the caliper and the fork, get one. I actually made mine from scrap metal. park etc make them. makes the adjustment no big deal
>>
>>1995949
I love side pull brakes. I tend to just loosen the nut on the back and spin the whole brake or adjust the cable tightness if it's janky.
I could be doing it wrong, but it seems to work.
>>
>>1995949
This usually means the caliper needs a service, actually, most single pivot calipers badly need a service and will work much better afterwards.

Lazy man's service is you remove the pads so as not to contaminate them, and just blast the pivot with wd40 and then a nice spray lube, both times, working it open and closed a million times.

Proper service take it completely apart, clean everything, and thinly grease all the pivoting surfaces and threads. It's easy to do with single pivot calipers.

>are there any that make adjusting the angle of the pads not miserable
The trick is to lightly grease (clean first if old) the washers and the thread of the bolt. That makes them much easier to adjust.

Cleaning and greasing stuff is really most of working on bikes.
>>
>>1995963
lol no i mean yeah sure but also no
>>
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Put a 203 on the front and 180 on the rear
The front as a whole flexes so much under strain that it rubs a little while pedaling hard which is amusing
>>
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>>1996013
This is stupid and I’m ordering a straight IS 180mm adapter, but this works for now
If anything I should use aluminum m6 bolts so they’ll fail before the frame cracks
>>
>>1996013
If you told me that frame was from the 90's i would almost believe it.

That's my issue with 8in/203mm rotors too. Seem to be constantly rubbing, which is fine doing DH but sucks pedaling.
Still, at least you got the experience. For most of my trails 160 or 180/160 is my preferred setup with a good brake.
>>
>>1995987
but also yeah
>>
>>1996014
Yeah this didn’t work, the 180/160 are going back on
It just flexes too much, especially the rear. The front I kinda expected it to do that and it did get better over the day, but the rear with the two adapters just isn’t happening.

>>1996018
It is a 2003 castellano fango, basically a first gen ibis ripley but with the designer John Castellano’s name on it
It’s an aluminum softtail, the chainstays are flexible
http://www.castellanodesigns.com/fango.html
>>
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>>1995375
Also as I do more to this
m560 derailleur, including touch up paint and new old stock jockey wheels
Problem, the freewheel mount isn’t perfect so it kinda wobbles, which makes the derailleur click, which is annoying as fuck
>>
>>1995375
>original chainring
That's a 5 bolt 94 bcd external and 54 bcd internal rig which means either keeping the old chainring or spending a capital on ebay for new machined chainrings.
i know because i have one. thank god the 22 teeth chainring is steel.
>>
>>1996102
wow, they're leaf springs. if the guy imitated an old design, that must mean it works pretty well, but then why don't we see more like that? just not as much travel as more modern shocks I guess?
>>
>>1996145
Nah not original, Origin8 the brand. It's a new chainring
>>1996160
We do see it now, cannondale has some of their higher end XC bikes that use carbon flexstays
I'm surprised it isn't more popular for gravel bikes, it's not like full suspension, it's closer to a hardtail, but the rear flexes just enough to smooth out a lot of rough stuff
>>
>>1996228
what's under the boot on the seatstays? elastomer, coil, or air/oil?
>>
>>1996233
Elastomer, it's held up pretty well after 20 years. It's adjustable with a bottom bracket tool
>>
>>1991676
>Bike Building General
I'm really iffy about the term 'building' to describe what we're doing here.

I say 'building up' but isn't 'building' actually making a frame ?
Also I think people coming to tinkering should be encouraged to think overhaul and reuse rather than custom. I personally regret how many projects I went too custom on for no real reason, and many people don't even have cone spanners but spring straight to custom chinkgroups or want to repaint without rust problems.

>>1991708
>Finished brazing a cromoly frame together couple months ago, ended up at 5 pounds.
That is awesome but 99% of anons are just gonna be putting something together.

Can we say 'project thread' next time ?
Not a demand and kinda curious what others think about this.
>>
>>1996263
Well I would say "building up a bike" would be what most of us do, where as "building a frame" or "constructing a frame" would be a definition of brazing/welding/laying carbon.
I think it depends on how much someone cares about the definition, or how strong their ego is.
Personally, I repair and repaint if required. Have stick welded a loose seatstay and it's been fine so far, obviously not the right fix but it rides fine.
>>
>>1996267
i just have an enormous amount of respect for people who do build bicycles and want to show that with the language i use

Not to be overly pedantic when people say it but the title of a general is pretty significant
>>
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Finally got around to drilling out the fork & seatstay bridge on that Miyata 610. Almost finished.

The original brakes were a pair of Dia-Compe single pivot, external nut. Didn't really want to use them. I have a pair of take-off RX100 brakes (BR-A550) laying around, but they're recessed nut.
Yeah some people say "brakes not necessary", but even on a fixed gear I like having them. Don't think I'll use this ss, but options are good.

So I got some stub length HSS drills 7mm & 8mm, and for the inside rear, the cheapest right angle drill attachment that I thought would work.
Out of the package that thing was super crunchy. Took it apart, no grease lol. So I put some on the bevel gears & needle bearings. Also it's a not-great-quality keyless chuck, and couldn't grip the smooth shank bits tight enough... until I used two pairs of vise grips. Only needed it for one hole, and it held up. Good enough.

Also drilled out 2 of 4 half-moon spacers, because they have to accept the recessed nut. The frame & fork don't have flat spots like later ones would. Used a smooth jaw vise, and I was surprised they didn't shift. That's a sizeable drill, and if you clamp too hard the spacer folds in half.

Removed the triple-box nuts from the backs of the calipers, to "recover" some bolt length. I don't anticipate any problems. The tip of the spring is captive, and there is a steel washer between it and the half moon spacer.
That's a mockup of what the mounting looks like. Still waiting on my Universal order with slightly longer recessed nuts.

I rarely use this pen-style Dremel, but this little carbide bit was just the thing for deburring these holes, esp in the fork crown.

>>1995962
I'm not paranoid, but I have a rare first name. /n/ is a nice enough board, but
>>
>>1996275
I mean, when people refer to their bike as a "build," that means they've significantly retrofitted it or built it up from a bare frame. a "bike build" isn't used to refer to a frame you've built out of tubing etc (although that could be part of a build, I suppose,) you would say "I built this frame" in that case.
I admit the op title is confusing but if you read the post it clearly means the common idiom as I have outlined.
I would propose "bike project general" in the future but I think the current title is fine for all but the strictest pedants.
>>
>>1996284
More of a single pivot fan, but that looks good.
I use my dremel for a ton of stuff like cutting housing, smoothing out any semi-major frame damage, and deburring like you are talking about.
>>
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I am in the process of making my bike lighter, I am only a bit conflicted about the chain guard, I want to keep the chain protected from dirt/rain and such, and be juuust sturdy enough to not be able to change the chain on accidental impact (if it were to happen by my foot I mean). Should I just get a chain glider or maybe something like this?
>>
>>1996263
don't post itt if you didn't even invent the universe to begin with
>>
>>1996408
chainguards are based, they weight like nothing, and you're min-maxing in the wrong area, minimal gains for significant lost convenience.
>>
So my plans to make a city bike with 16 speeds and only two gears (nexus 8 speed hub and FSA Metropolis Patterson) fell apart when I realized my frame didn't work with the wheel. What do I need to look for via a vis a frame that does actually fit a rim brake Nexus/Alfine wheel?
>>
>>1996729
chainguards are the wrong solution to a problem. we have drip wax lubes nowadays
>>
>>1996753
Waxing chains is deviant homosexual behavior
>>
>>1996757
Based
>>
>>1996757
nta but drip wax isn't waxing your chain, and calling it that deviant behavior

t. homosexual with a waxed chain (and anus)
>>
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I like how the death of middle class can be seen in something as silly as used bike parts. Pre-covid I could pop onto local marketplaces and find just about anything for any price point, but nowadays it's either recent extreme low end (more often than not sold by people who are too lazy to check amazon, nevermind ali, for comparable parts and realise that they are asking way too much), or like-new quality extreme high end, new or vintage, for insane prices. Midrange is gone, imperfect/fixer-upper high-end for midrange prices is gone, niche parts (that are not cranked to absolute bejesus) are gone, there's a big jump between BSO garbage and fred sled paraphernelia, and also dwindling variety.
Case in point, something as simple as turn of the century cantilever brakes are impossible to find now, used to have to filter these out because cheap ones were everywhere and none of my bikes had a need for 'em, but now I need a pair to remain period correct on my new build and there's a single hit for any cantis in my entire city, for 80 fucking bucks. They are super nice, all shiny and chrome and polished, and for someone looking for that probably worth the price, but they are also way too nice for what I'm building, which is a humble 90s mostly Shimano-equipped touring bike. Also need an inch quill stem that goes up instead of down, but those seem to also have ceased to exist, only shoulders down ass up fixiebait shit can be found. 36-spoke hubs are all gone too, for that matter, modern 32-hole ones (vast majority of them for dick brakes) flood the listings, I've given up and ordered a new chink Shufeng, it looks inconspicuous enough.
>>
>>1997317
I recommend looking at complete used bikes for parts.
Ebay has some decent prices for vintage mtb quill stems. I do plan on hitting the bike kitchen/co ops and bike shows.
I have gotten decent prices for parts locally, but I look frequently.
It's 2024, people are hurting but bikes are still cheap
>>
>>1997318
>I recommend looking at complete used bikes
That's how I ended up with the touring frame I'm building up in the first place. This kind of cyclical part trading won't get me anywhere.
>>
>>1997319
If you only need 1 or 2 parts then yes, new or ebay is sometimes your only option.
It's 2024 and dick brakes is all that's being produced anymore thus rim brake parts of any kind will be dwindling. Eventually the parts will go the way of downtube shifters where only a couple brands make new stuff.

Modern chinese stuff seems decent enough.
>>
>>1997317
I got basic bitch 3x7 mtb trigger shifters that are just cloned 90s tech that the patent ran out on from a no-name chinese company for $12 off scamazon . they work pretty great. not sure how they'll hold up long term, though. stems, posts, and bars by zoom or uno off ali seem fine, too. got possibly bootleg microshift brifters there for like $50. they're working well.
the answer is China. Japan ain't making money on that stuff anymore and China is filling in the gaps.
>>
Redpill me on PAUL components.

What's the deal? They look nice, but fuck me, why so expenny? They don't perform braking any better than stuff that costs 1/100th of the price.

What gives.
>>
>>1997431
Autist bling for people who want something besides framesets and wheels to sperg over. You had the money for Dura Ace but you need to show everyone that you know the One Cool Trick Big Cycling Doesn't Want You To Know. Like sure you could get hydraulic brakes that work better than any mech shit or or hey what about... what if instead of addressing the real problem (cables) we just came up with an extremely expensive and labor intensive "hack" that isn't better, but it looks bad ass.

Basically if you are the kind of weirdo who hand compiles gantoo every morning for your MBP with 16 cores and 48 GB of RAM, which you then use for shitposting on /g/, you should have Paul shit on your bike.
>>
>>1997431
fancy old school components milled out of aluminum billets is my guess, oh in america too.
My dad has some on his fat chance and they are nice.... but it's bling.

That's also why their parts get copied on ebay or aliexpress, it's bling so most people just want the look.
>>
Looking for a metallic orange gravel bike steel frame. Any ideas which manufacturers make them?
>>
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>>1997317
what you're saying doesn't make sense

quill stems and cantilever brakes don't really wear out, so there are just as many of them floating around as there ever were.
You're basically just not clued into a local market, good local markets being in places where nice bikes were bought/sold in the 90s. I suggest you either make friends or move.

Just because there aren't people putting effort into selling parts (and the ones that do want high prices) doesn't mean that those parts don't exist.

There is also a not insignificant renaissance in cottage parts and I regularly buy lightly used nitto etc stems for less than half the price of new, all that depends on is again, a healthy bike community with people who occasionally drop money at blue lug and such and then regret it. So again, make friends, online or in person, or move. The market you want to exist doesn't not exist it's just not visible to you.

As for riser stems not existing, they do exist, there are numerous varities still in production and again, they don't dissapear, or break, so what you're saying doesn't make sense. Possibly what you're seeing is an increased -demand- for these things, so you're no longer able to swoop as easily on forgotten stuff off boomers, but that doesn't mean the death of a middle class, it's actually a resurgence of it.
>>
>>1997317
you can still get a variety of dia compe cantis, new for like $30, even shimano cantis.
Soma, VO, Nitto, etc, have riser quill stems for $50 +

EVERYTHING in the fucking world is more expensive than it used to be and with that in mind your choices for new retrodouche shit are actually quite good.
>>
I quit smoking cigarettes a couple years ago, and decided to put the $7 into a jar every day. I use that money to buy bikes off of Craigslist and Facebook anytime I see something with a desirable frame or components, I buy it and throw it into the hoard pile to be stripped or restored. I probably average $20 a week.
>>
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>>1997431
the same people who resent stuff like paul will love to tell you all about their exotic 90s bike (so cheap!) which would have been outrageously expensive when IT was purchased new.

I say god bless anyone who buys the fancy new shit which actually has a long lifecycle because on the used market it becomes reasonable to buy and everyone benefits.
>>
>>1997639
I smoked a pack or two a day for about 10 years while I cycled. Then I quit smoking. It's been like 3 or 4 years since I got into a smoke habbit. My cruising speed on the road bike is now 22 mph. Successfully kicking the smoke habbit is the best thing in my life.
>>
>>1997646
yeah smoking less weed makes me so much faster on the bike
>>
>>1997646
Yeah, I smoked for 20 years. It was time. I used a vape pen then stopped using that, too. Made it very simple.

>>1997647
I wouldn't know, I've never quit smoking reefer
>>
>>1997663
not quit just stopped smoking by myself

big life improvement
>>
>>1997636
New is not the same, anon. If I wanted new, I wouldn't seek out cantilevers in the first place, I'd just put on V-brakes, or maybe even toss the fork and make a half-disc mullet. I want to build a bike that could've reasonably existed 25 years ago, and reasonably close to original spec. It's a mishmash of parts because originality is impossible to achieve at this point, but they are all around that age and class, with appropriate amount of wear and patina.
>>
>>1998699
I want a lament the loss of the middle class more than anyone but uh maybe it's just the fact that you're looking for 30 year old parts. They're bicycles man, the average one gets ridden for 2 years, placed a garage for 10 years and then is typically just thrown away.
>>
>>1996729
just wait until freds understand the aerodynamic benefits. Next thing they'll realise a loadbearing chaincase will make chainstays obsolete and the chaincase will be the only thing holding the rear wheel in place. At least on tri bikes.
>>
>>1997671
I should follow suit but damn I'd be back to angry person I was, half the reason I smoked so much tobacco back in the day was because I had a job I couldn't smoke weed. I only vape weed oil now, the storage pen is the best thing ever, I rip it all day
>>
I saw this thread and remembered I have my last bicycle from my teens in my mum's shed, it has probably been in there undisturbed for well over a decade..... what state do you think it'll be in?
Pretty sure I bought it for £10 too.
>>
>>1998880
rough, but fixable.
>>
>>1998881
I'll take a peek and report back in this general with my findings and maybe photos.
If its the bicycle I think it is then I remember the rear wheel popping twice in a row.
>>
>>1991676
I swapped out the cranks on my project cruiser and forgot to check the chainring clearance, the only chainrings I have in this crank's size are too big and touch the frame RIP. I also mutilated the old chain because it would've been too small so now I have to wait for the smaller chainring and new chain.
>>
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>>1998699
>It's a mishmash of parts because originality is impossible to achieve at this point,
your goal is stupid. You should be looking for things that look the part.
new parts based on old designs can look fantastic on classic-style builds.
No different from what you might achieve with actual old stuff and polishing.

As for not having patina, acquire it. Ride your bike.
>>
>>1998907
NOooooOooo you don't understand my bike must be perfect. There'll be no more AliExpress parts, there'll be no more bad lubricants, no more destroyers of my alloys. From now on, it will be total organization. Every bolt must be tight.
>>
I just got filtered by sram/avid hydraulic disk brakes.
sigh, Will spend more time on them after this break.

I don't know if someone said here, but you do get dot fluid everywhere when doing this shit.
Sad thing is I don't even like the lever feel or lever design, but I am too stingy to get some mt200's or my favorite hayes stroker brakes.
>>
>>1999012
>but you do get dot fluid everywhere when doing this shit
Look, I hate mass-replies, but

>>1997078
>>1997271
>>1997481
>>1998116
>>1998552
>>1998604
>>1998617
>>
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>>1999012
figured it out, was trying one video's technique and that wasn't working.
Just said F that and pushed/pulled until it felt okay, removed caliper syringe then put the bleed screw in, and did the same to the top.
Then adjusted pad adjust till the feel was far enough out.

Still like my other brakes more but these are fine. I still don't know why sram brakes squeal the most, but I suspect they come with metallic pads.
>>
>>1998907
My goal is not for it to look fantastic, in fact it's a bit of the opposite. It's not some boutique bike, it has tired paint I'm not planning to restore, it came with beat up and worn out but functional components on it that I can't replace for the same reasons I can't find brakes and stem, the last thing it needs is polish. A spotless chrome stem and top-tier modern cantis would look idiotic right next to a rust spot on steerer tube where shifter cables rubbed through over a dozen years of usage, 80% worn out 20-year old Marathons that are way past their prime but still yet to dry rot, and very worn and mismatched front wheel (the original was stolen, currently fruitlessly looking for a matching rim).
>>1998842
Modern shit is still affected. The regular circulation of bottom-tier BSOs is undisturbed, so is big buck stuff where a single component is more expensive than the entire BSO and maybe even ten, but people hold onto humble mid-tier bikes more now, people don't upgrade so mass-produced but quality parts and bikes are in a very short supply. Used to put XCM into search bar and get hundreds of hits for all sizes and shapes, all from people upgrading to higher-grade forks, nowadays there's like quarter of the selection at prices that make brand new chink forks an appealing choice. You know things went to shit when even used market loses to China.
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>>1999119
I'm not reading all that you retard.
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>>1998880
>>1998881
>>1998883
Got a look at it, what do we thing?
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>>1999217
it's fixable but I would only do it if you are interested in learning, or want a cheap way to get around.
>>
>>1999119
>people hold onto humble mid-tier bikes more now
people have always held onto their mid-tier bikes because those are usually the most personal, most buy them out of necessity but also that the mid-tier hits a price to performance sweet spot
>brand new chink forks an appealing choice
to be fair, their manufacturing standards have come a long way and caught up, some would even say surpassed in some ways, to our own. There's a big however though, they strongly believe in "you get what you pay for" and so corporats looking to penny pinch so hard out of profit greed will receive what they pay for. There's a reason almost all carbon parts are manufactured overseas now.
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>>1999222
I'll dig it out and check out the whole thing.
I think I could do a half decent restoration with what I know already but it depends on how much money I'll have to sink into it.
Maybe I should record it and make a restoration video.
>>
>>1999222
If I wanted to learn I'd take that thing apart and clean and sort the parts. You'll learn a lot that way. Then I'd throw most of the shit away because you can find a $20 bike on craigslist to restore that would be 50x better than that nightmare heap. It's not worth the buying a new chain, cables pads tires tubes rim liners etc etc you'll be in $150 for a turd by the time all is said and done
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>>1999226
Thats what I feared. Would be nice to bring it back to life, but cant beat the cost of what it'll take.
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>>1999229
You can probably make it rideable for the cost of tires tubes and some lube, but ehhhhh
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>>1999239
Who shamed anyone you hypersensitive fucking faggot? Dude got good advice and agreed with it.
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>>1999244
Sorry, that was meant for another post in another thread. I'm going to bed.
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>>1999217
my dude get that thing down there and show us. As anons have informed you it's not economical to invest into this. But it may very well ride again for very little to no investment and not every decision needs to be an economical one, in fact most decisions are not and it is completely fine. If you want to try something you've not done before this might be a good place to start. Some people learn how fragile many bicycle specific parts and their finishes are only when first working on a bike. It better be a cheap one.
Regarding cost:
If you get the tubes to hold air you'll be rolling and find out what else is up. Else tubes can run as low as 4 units a pop. Be that eur, gbp or usd. The chain that is on there will be terrible but it will work. If you want to replace it cheap chains go for maybe 7 units, come with a link and they'll rust and stretch in no time. But you'll have replaced a chain using suboptimal tools like needlennose pliers or a hammer and punch.
You should define a limit where you want to stop before venturing out. You see, theres alot of unknowns here. But as long as you see the money youre using as a tuition fee thats alright.
To start off you want to have grease, common tools, a pump, maybe a crank puller, maybe cone wrenches, penetrating oil won't hurt, soap water and a rag.
Things you can do / learn: See if tires hold air. If spare tubes replace. Clean bike. Remove seatpost, grease and replace. Check spoke tension by feel. Remove wheels, check wheel bearings by feel, check headset and bb by feel, remove bars and stem, undo heatset, inspect and if okay clean, lubricate, assemble and adjust.
If cone wrenches (and freehub tool): disassemble, clean, inspect and if okay lubricate, reassemble and adjust hubs.
If spare chain: Break chain and replace. And so on. Decide as you go what you want to try and get what you need.
>>
I have mixed feelings about 3 piece 48 spline bmx cranks. On one hand they are supposedly the strongest and they are beefy.
On the other hand crank arm removal always feels like something is going to break. Whether it's the removal tool, the bearings in the BB, or something else.

Anyways, figured out the sprocket was missing the tophat spacer, so got one of those, removed, installed, and now the chain tension is even, which is nice.
>>
>>1999245
You don't have to apologize. It was probably me in the other thread. I'm an absolute fucking menace.
>>
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>>1991676
how do i build a 3x in current year?
i need something like this but i cant find anything
even on aliexpress
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>>1999573
this is a similar one i can buy but extremely overpriced
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>>1999574
my current temptation is to drill 64bcd holes in one of these
i think im gonna have some major chainline issues though
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>>1999576
this one already has some holes that are close enough but maybe this is an even worse idea
unfortunately unless anyone knows where i can find a spider im gonna have to commit some horrific jank here
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>>1999573
just buy a normal triple and a square taper BB?
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>>1999637
i have a hollowtech bb in my frame and im trying to find a way to do a tripple with short cranks
theres alot of options on aliexpress for different lengths of gpx cranks so i just need to find a spider with both 104 and 64bcd holes
either that or i get a 175mm crankset with the spider built in and drill it down to shorten it but this way seems easier
plus i wana use gxp and the 2 peice crankset so i can swap to other chainrings and stuff easily because i like to experiment with my gearing set ups
theres an 18t gxp chainring i wanna try out too
maybe find a way to jank it on as well to make a 4x lol
>>
>>1999637
oh and i have 2 bikes with square tapers but to get short cranks without the chainrings being rivited on i will still need to drill the cranks shorter
i have a rivited short crankset and its amazing but i wanna be able to change the gearing so i have to go further with my jank
>>
Reminder that if you're building up an aluminium or steel frame, facing the BB shell, steerer tube, and disc-mounts will make everything run that little bit better and have less problems and premature wear.
>>
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Why does no one sell this?
Why did I have to design it myself?
Is there some issue with using the top stem cap I don't know about because I'm new?
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>>2001610
im not really sure what im looking at here
whats that thing for?
>>2001576
espensiiive
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>>2001610
I 3D printed a Quadlock adapter that is also the stem cap, because you can't buy one
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>>2001633
>>
>>2001633
>>2001634
oooooohhhh i get it now
thats really cool actually
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>>2001630
Nehhhh, my local guy is good and charged me 50 beans for both tube and BB.
Worth it, as I was using dura-ace components, but if you're building a clunker it's probably not worth it.
It's a bit like a derailleur hanger tool: worth buying the tool if you do a lot of builds, but otherwise it's not justifiable.
>>
>>2001657
hanger alignment tools are waay cheaper than facing tools, i have a hanger alignment gauge because it was cheaper than a new hanger lol
god forbid i ever need a facing tool that will cost more than my bikes
>>
>>1991676
how do i figure out what spindle length square taper to buy?
its an mtb with a 73mm threaded shell
i dont have the cranks yet but im going to use a sram s600 triple crankset
i cant find a straight answer for this anywhere
pic related is the current state of my build
(ignore the hollowtech bb im not using that and waiting for my tool to remove it)
>>
>>2001675
I wasn't getting clean shifts after years of riding (including one gnarly drive side crash) and my limit screw was maxed. took the wheel off, got my jurgensen clamp with jaws pointed upward, put one side over the derailleur bolt, put the other side against the hangar, grabbed the outboard handle and pulled it upwards. probably pivoted a few degrees, you could see the alignment go back to parallel with the ground. all of a sudden, perfect shifting again. gee, it's nice to have a steel bike sometimes.
>>
>>2001684
*perpendicular jaws, parallel handle
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>>2001684
im a big fan of these things
i know they look ugly but i havnt needed to do a hanger alignment since i started using them on all my bikes (i have a bad habit of bashing my rear derailleur on things)
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>>2001682
Learn to use google better. It's 113mm

Tapers wear and the same crank in different condition can install on further, plus, the fact that 'JIS' is not even a precise standard and taper shapes will differ between models of bottom bracket, plus frames being different, it's not possible to give you a straight answer.

You basically want as narrow as you can possibly go, and many stated 'correct' spindle lengths for a crank will be given conservatively.

You may be better off with 111 or 115. It's trial and error. Just don't actually press the crank on unless you're relatively sure it's the correct bb.
>>
>>2001682
the fd you use may also complicate the desired spindle length.
>>
>>2001688
I really like friction shifting since I don't have to have perfect derailleur hanger alignment.
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>>2001700
best is shifters with index or friction mode so you can choose to worry or not
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>>2001701
I gotchu senpai
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>>2001693
ok noted
the answeres i found were all waaay longer like in the 120s
>>2001694
im gonna be using an xtr m970
i guess i am just gonna have to wait till my cranks arrive and then go to a bike shop to have different bbs tested
yaaay
>>2001700
same
i only run frictions nowadays except on one of my bikes
>>2001701
yeah im running a 9s thumbie converted to friction right now
plus you can use any cassette you want which is hilarious
>casually upgrades from 8 to 13 speeds with the same shifter
nothing personelle kid
>>
friction shifters are just cooler. i can be a retard and not have to adjust or dial anything in, and still get hipster points. even the shitty $10 sunrace quill shifters work great.
>>
>>2001859
im about to unironically run xtr deraillieurs with aliexpress friction shifters lol
probably not hipster points but it just werks and im poor lel (i got the xtrs cheap second hand)
havnt been able to find any good shifters second hand though
>>
I'm replacing trp hyrd with bb7s, how bad of an idea is it
>>
>>2002148
I don't like the feel of mech disks, but some do. You will find out soon.
>>
>>2002148
as someone who put a lot of money and hours into making my mech dicks not suck, including switching TO hyrds, my advice is sell it and buy a bike that was made in the last 5 years. or if you're emotionally attached to the frame, get hylex and barcons
>>
should you grease shift and brake cables? for good conditions road biking
>>
>>2002165
I prefer to just drop some lube down them once in a blue moon. If you are running ancient cables with metal on metal housing grease could be better.
>>
>>2002165
mustache man Calvin says put some oil down the housing before inserting the cables .
I put a little blob of grease on my finger and pinch the cable hard and run it through to mash grease into the braid. I don't know if it's "good" but it's just something I've always done and it never did me any harm
>>
>>2002165
there seems to be a division on this.. some people say lubing them causes dirt and muck to build up and can cause some binding, and others seem to say it's standard procedure.. and these days there's like teflon coated sleeves and shit a la jagwire. personally i use thin oil, like 3 in 1, or sewing machine oil. i actually just mix mineral oil and mineral spirits because i'm cheap. i don't think it matters much either way, but i do put a dab of grease around the ends of the cable every once in a while to prevent anything from getting in there.
>>
>>2002148
>>2002149
>>2002155
thanks for your opinions, I'm mainly looking for simplicity and ease of maintenance, ideally I'd switch to non disc brakes but I'd have to switch wheels as well and can't do that atm
>>
Is 2,9kg a lot for a coil fork for mtb? It's before I cut the stem so it will be like 2,8kg I guess
>>
>>2002149
>>2002155
skill issue bb7s feel great
id they dont you fucked up the install
rim brakes still feel better though but sometimes disks make more sense
>buy something newer
fuck no modern bikes feel disgusting buy an old bike if you want it to work properly
>>2002165
i used chain lube i think grease would be too thick
>>2002175
if youre going to use lube then you have to clean it sometimes yes
if you never want to clean then dont
>>2002251
what fork though
also depends on the mtb and how you ride it
>>
>>2002285
>if youre going to use lube then you have to clean it sometimes yes

i would only lube old and/or cheap housing, anyways. newer stuff that's teflon coated doesn't benefit from it.
>>
>>2002285
>shitty frankenbikes with mech dick breaks "work properly" and are better than rim or hydro
yeah it's coping time
>>
>>1997317
If you're buying old parts then this is explained by there just being fewer around and people spending their covid-bux buying the remaining ones up, and the rest being thrown in the trash where they belong.
>>
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Was giving my bike (Focus Arriba Altus) a larger seasonal repair. Noticed that the kryptonite lock has managed to somehow wear down even the aluminum in the seat tube. The hole is small, maybe 1mm in diameter.

Is this bike safe to ride anymore?
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>>2002361
Here's another point of view of the seat tube and the wear that the lock has managed to do. This is how I've stored my locks during riding and the lock has been in this position for five years.
>>
>>2002361
lol oh wow

>seat tube
one of the seat stays you mean
i feel like there should be a way to repair that and stop it cracking.

or just keep an eye on it.
>>
>>2002361
It is safe to ride. My panniers have done the same to mine.
Do not do anything stupid to it. If its a cosmetic problem go for automotive putty or any other composite material. Do not weld or braze it.
>>
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>>2001774
+1
picrel is from when I first tried that I sadly don't have a current pic of this one.
>>
>>2002361
Ride her, and if she is swaying funky, or you notice it's wrecked get a new frame.
>>
>>2002364
maybe a spot weld could build it back out?
it looks sketchy to me but possibly it's fine, I'm not an engineer.
problem with welding is the guys by me have a $50 minimum, so even just a little zap or two could be more than the damn frame is worth, although transferring all your shit to a new frame or getting a new used bike would certainly come out to more
>>
>>2002385
>I'm not an engineer
then please do not.
It is clear this man has ridden the bike up to this point and it was fine. Seatstays are not highly stressed members of a bicycle frame, usually overdimensioned and by the looks of the image provided they are truly beefy in this particular case and the damage is minor. Further riding will be just as fine as it was up to this point. If it's going to fail it's very likely a crack will begin to form starting at the hole and going around the tube. Nothing catastrophical.
>welding
It is clearly an aluminium frame. Most alluminium alloys used in bicycle frames will require a heat treatment cycle after annealing. This requires the entire frame to be stripped, placed entirely in an oven, and repainted after the heating cycle. Else the strength of the material in the heat affected zone may be somewhere around 1/3 of what it was originally. Since the majority of the material is still present in the area losing 2/3s of its strength is a worse outcome than the little section remaining missing (a condition that has been proven to work and not fail catastrophically).
It may be a rare frame, made out of an alloy like 7075. In this case precipitation hardeninh will occur at room temperature within 3 months or so. So weld it up, chuck it into a corner, wait 3 months, good to go. Waiting 3 months again hardly seems worth the questionable improvement.
Either way our friend here will not be able to tell wether his frame is 6061 or 7075 aluminium or what have you, unless he comes across some sales literaturw which may or may not be accurate.
>>2002364
Anon please, do not weld it. If you want you can apply any composite material, it will build the area back up, seat the hole and add a miniscule amount of strength. You will need etch primer to get a reliable bond. Same goes for painting. Do not weld it. Inspect regularly for a crack forming. If youre really desperate after it cracked sleeve it externally or internally and bond it.
>>
>>2002365
>>2002367
>>2002385
I can't see any other signs of fatique in the frame, but the small hole still makes me uncomfortable. I've tried googling is it even worth it to spot weld an aluminium frame; some peole say it can be done and other people say that it doesn't fix the underlying weakness of the metal caused by prolongued wear.

I'll try to find a cheap shop near me and contacting them. Thanks for the reassurance that she is still safe to ride.

Best timing ever to spot this on my bike. I'm supposed to go on a touring vacation with my bike next week and ride about 1200km in three weeks. Let's hope that everything works out and the frame holds it together.

>>2002369
I'll give her some gentle rides and try to stop when she starts to make some weird sounds.
>>
How thick must the steel be for making iso tabs?
3mm too thin? 160mm rotors. For city riding and maybe commuting. Bo heavy downhill tour de france decenst planned
>>
>>2002390
Took so long to write>>2002394 (thanks captcha) that didn't see this.

Thanks for the info on welding. Will skip that and keep an eye on the hole.
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>>2002396
Braze on or adapter ? Braze ons I buy come 5mm and are CrMo so account for that if you want ro use structural or mystery steel. What the safe minimum would be idk, it shouldnt be too hard to calculate the ballpark after making a few assumptions.
>>2002397
https://materialsdata.nist.gov/bitstream/handle/11115/186/Understanding%20Temper%20Designation.pdf?sequence=3
If you want to know why. Search for the entry 6061 in the table. It's my goto first bet what aluminium bikes are made out of. Then compare yield strength for tempers O vs T6.
>>
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>>1991676
Without doing my homework for me, is it possible to build a bike at the same quality and near price range of this bike?

https://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/700c-hyper-36volt-black/6000205706963

I built my PC, I can handle building a bike along with the conversion kit. is it worth it?
>>
>>2002872
Building a bicycle is harder than a PC, mostly cause it’s not as standardised, and there are a lot of special tools required. The poverty ebike of choice is a cheap hardtail from Facebook marketplace and a cheap front wheel conversation kit. Don’t burn your house down.
>>
>>2002874
what kind of tools? I got a standard toolkit and all kinds of drills if that's what I need.
> The poverty ebike of choice is a cheap hardtail from Facebook marketplace
that's what I was looking for, thanks buddy
>and a cheap front wheel conversation kit.
this is where I'm stumbling on, idk if I should ask for more deets here or just go to the ebike general. Some of these conversion kits are more expensive thana used motorbike.
>>
>>2002876
Do you have any bike-specific tools? I’m gonna assume no. I built my bike from the frame up and I had to get the bike shop to pressfit the headset cause paying labour was cheaper than the tool. But you need various tools for fitting your BB, cassettes and cutting cable housing. Don’t bother with a new frame, go the hardtail route and learn what tools you’ll need to work on it. In bicycling, building your own is more about creating something bespoke, but being able to tear down and rebuild your current bike is an excellent skill to have.

Go to the ebike thread, you’ll get better support for conversion kits.
>>
>>2002878
crazy, you'd think building your own from parts would be cheaper.

Thanks for the help at least.
>>
>>2002880
I mean, if you wanna start welding gaspipe and bending rods, you’d probably be able to make something cheaply, but I wouldn’t want to ride it.
It’s not really the labour that’s the problem for bicycles, it’s all done cheaply, it’s the parts, and all the markup that’s through the supply chain. At the bottom end anyway. Boutique and custom frames are obviously all about labour cost.
>>
>>2002884
It's just crazy to hear that after building a PC for $500 that can do literally everything.

I already have a prebuilt ebike that has everything I want and it's only $400 at walmart. But it's disheartening to hear that next to nobody builds them unless they're affluent enthusiasts.
>>
>>2002886
I wouldn’t be that worried, the diy scene is strong, it’s just different to PC. Most people are buying 20+ year old bikes for cheap and rebuilding them to be what they want. That’s how I started off, before buying a boutique frame. Have a look at the xbiking subreddit if you’re curious. It’s easily as vibrant as the PC ricing space.
>>
>>2002878
I made my own headset press with washers and threaded rod. For the crown race, I used a pvc and end cap plus brass hammer I had laying around. A long time ago, I was also too cheap to buy a cone wrench, so I made one out of heavy steel cut sheet to size, stronger than the cheapo stamped steel cone wrenches I eventually bought and bent. A good bike mechanic uses the right tool for the right job, an expert bike mechanic can build his own tools if needed.
>>
>>2002901
I’m certainly not an expert, but I’ll flushed with cash so I usually just buy the park tool if it makes sense to.



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