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Monkey prefer track drops

Resources:
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/
https://www.parktool.com/en-us/blog/repair-help

Previous thread: >>2005789
>>
Who makes road bikes that can handle a fat man riding it around(280lbs/127kg)
>>
>>2007455
Surly goes out of their way to say their bikes can handle fat guys

If you're too insecure to ride an entry level shitter I believe rivendell has some of those meme frames with a double top tube
>>
>>2007455
Sport touring, gravel, or all road bikes would be my choice. If you want vintage go sport touring to just touring bikes. Modern would be gravel bikes or all road if you want tighter geo.
Emphasis on strong wheels, and strong parts.

OTOH I don't break stuff at 220lbs, but I do my best to ride "light" and tighten/adjust spoke tension when the wheel goes out of alignment.

If a mtb/hybrid fits you better there is nothing wrong with riding those too.
>>
I preordered one of these for $2200 how much did I fuck up?
https://wiredebikes.com/products/wired-freedom
>remember to use affiliate code citizen-50 anon!
>>
>>2007459
whir whir whir whir whir whir whir
Hope you like that sound
>>
>>2007459
there are several threads for electric motorcycles and homemade incendiary devices already
>>
>>2007456
I've looked at surly's before. There's a few dealers in my area but nobody has any inventory. That rivendell roadini looks great.
>>2007458
Gravel bikes are mostly what I've been browsing. Anything steel frame, 700c. I've been riding the same old trek marlin 29er since like 2010. Great bike and it's held up fine over the years, I'm just really looking to get something aimed more towards dedicated road riding. The trek does alright in regards to rolling resistance with the panaracer comets ive got on it now, but it still has the mountain bike geometry which kills any aspirations of really being able to cruise at a good speed.
>>
>>2007462
Sound like you are right on track. I have heard all-city makes some decent steel bikes too. Find some bikes you like and post about them in /bbg/ or here later and we can tell you more about the comparison of each one.

Also, go to a bike store and sit on some bikes so you can get a real view on them.

Oh, and it takes a little bit of time to get used to riding a road bike with the position.
>>
>>2007462
You don't need a steel frame.
I don't even think you need a gravel bike. Just buy whatever road bike which will fit 32s and then budget to have some custom wheels built if the stock ones don't hold up.

Especially if you're tall (god i hope so) then nice XL road bikes are built for people who weigh 90 kg and are a lot stronger than you. The stresses you'll put on it aren't that different.

You could also just get a gravel bike and i definately wouldn't limit that to steel only. You're basically just ruling out most nice newer bikes if you do that. Nothing wrong with steel but if you really want a steel bike look used. If you can find a good deal on a used bike then custom wheels for it might make more sense too.
>>
>>2007475
>You don't need a steel frame.
shut ur whore mouth
>>
>>2007462
post local craigslist and height

If you like that riv you may find an equivalent high end project that is relatively inexpensive.
>>
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>>2007477
i am the biggest steelfag on /n/ but i will not deny the quality of just a basic new road bike.
Pic rel, or a giant contend or really most nice entry level roadies are the best all rounder bike for anyone including a fat.

wide gears, huge compatibility with cheap & good parts, wide tire clearance, rack mounts. Get a narrow profile rear rack and it's not too bad to swing a leg over.

>>2007455
Get any road bike with claris or sora, a carbon fork, mech discs, and a standard threaded bottom bracket.
Look for a size where you can adjust the bars to be on level with your correct saddle height, without re-cabling. That gives a nice relaxed fit.

most importantly buy a bike with a cool colour that you like, if you're on the fence about looks don't buy it.
>>
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I asked a question here about canabalizing one bike to revive my old GT a couple of weeks ago, some people commented on how horrible GT's cable routing to the rear cantilever brakes was. I had the idea stealing the front shock brake holder from my donor bike and putting it on my GT in the rear to replace the factory cable setup and it works great! Kinda dumb but I feel good and I'm sure others have been in similar situations.
>>
>>2007478
32220
74in/188cm. My pants are usually a 32 in the leg
>>
>>2007486
Get this. Take 800 cash to view it and offer that.
https://jacksonville.craigslist.org/bik/d/kings-bay-kona-honky-tonk-custom-build/7757984477.html

or this
https://jacksonville.craigslist.org/bik/d/ponte-vedra-beach-bfull-carbon-trek/7763727531.html

I would also ask to meet and view this, and take $100 cash to offer.
https://jacksonville.craigslist.org/bop/d/atlantic-beach-super-cool-retro/7762874370.html
>>
>>2007455
I haven't damaged the frame of my 2015 AWOL Elite despite maxing out around 260lbs but I did crack the rims that came with it by hopping curbs and upgrade to 36 spoke wheels. Any steel frame gravel bike will probably do you.
>>
>>2007484
very good solution

Your brake pads are backwards btw. The long side should be trailing.
>>
>>2007489
>https://jacksonville.craigslist.org/bik/d/kings-bay-kona-honky-tonk-custom-build/7757984477.html
big advantage for you is the super high head tube and simple cable routing. You can set up a riser stem with this easily. You can have a very relaxed position.

the ultegra groupset is very nice, although that's the crankset which can come unbonded and was a scandalous recall and the cassette is not wide enough.
>>
are fat tire 750w ebikes really that bad?

I live in a big hilly city that's always under construction so there's always temporary gravel and rough sidewalks, and I have a roughly 2 mile commute. Everything I want to get to in my city is within 10 miles so a 30ish-mile range is fine. There's obviously a lot of shitty junk on Amazon, but if you buy a more reputable brand could they be solid?
>>
>>2007494
buy it from a shop that thinks consumer protection laws are real, so, if stuff breaks unreasonably quickly, they will fix or replace it. And beyond that, that they will service it.
>>
>>2007484
That's a beefy brake holder. I also agree with the other anon on rotating the pads.
>>
>>2007494
IDK if they are bad but people FLY on those things at my local bike trail. I just don't like the loud tires. Seems like a perfect option for you.
>>
>>2007494
745.69 Watts is 1 horsepower, that's not entirely bad but it's not good for all the extra bloat associated with a powered motor. An elite athlete can push half a horsepower for a sustained hour and can burst 3-4 horsepower for short periods of time, on a bike that weighs nothing. Now we can compare that to a 1 horsepower 60-70lb ebike, kind of not worth it until we're talking 3kW or about 4 horsepower
>>
>>2007481
>cable dicks
post invalidated
>>
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Left or right
>>
>>2007519
>full suspension shoes
Best thing to happen on the MTB scene since dropper posts
>>
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Is there any sort of "removable crank" on the market?
Like, a crank arm that can be removed/reattached with say just an allen key, but all the other parts stay on (lockring, spindle, chain ring, etc.)...

Literally just the arms tho, everything else stays put.
>>
>>2007527

no
>>
I haven't ridden a bike in a decade and am looking to get a road bike. How much difference is there between an older, inexpensive used steel frame road bike vs a new road bike in the $1,000 range?

Are gravel bikes something I should consider looking into? I live in a rural area and have both paved and unpaved roads near me. My main interest is biking on paved roads, but if gravel bikes work well for both I'd be interested in one.
>>
>>2007536
Gravel bikes work well for both. The caveat is that at higher speeds they will require more watts than the comparable road bike. They also tend to be a little bit heavier than the comparable road bike but that's because they are also a bit more heavy duty. If you are riding mostly on roads then I'd suggest the road bike. If you are actually interested in riding on gravel , limestone or similar surfaces, then go for the gravel bike. It might be good for you to find new roads.
>>
My commute is 10miles, slightly uphill in the morning. I get between 12,5-13,5 mph (20/22kmh) average going to work, and usually 15,5 mph (25 kmh) on the road back home.

My question is: would electrifying my bike with a Swytch kit or similar (about +3kg) provide a sizeable avg speed gain, knowing that 15,5mph/25kmh is the legal speed limit for e-bikes where I live?

I figure it can get me up the hills a bit faster while the added 3kg won't slow me down drastically when cycling like a madman (without assistance) on the flats or downhill?
>>
>>2007546
Weight doesn't really slow you down on flats, it just makes it harder to get up to speed (which the motor should help with anyway). I don't really see any downsides to adding that for a commute. It should help with hills and taking off from red lights and stuff.
>>
>>2007536
there's a big difference. the thing to watch out for in that price range is cable dicks. avoid them like the plague
>>
>>2007519
Left easy, rear triangle looks sexy but mostly right looks shit
>>
>>2007527
Why??
They make folding pedals if that helps solve your iasue
>>
>>2007527
just take the seat post with you when you lock up your bike like normal people
>>
>>2007527
maybe they make removable pedals?
Otherwise you could get some of those weird clipless pedals that suck to pedal on without the shoe.

>>2007536
New gravel/all road bike is the easiest.

An older gravel bike is fine. Or a cx/hybrid would work too. Hybrid would need curly bar mods but all of those can fit large enough tires.
Still, that's the hard route.
>>2007546
I mean you can max out the 15.5mph or chip/tune it so it's not limited.
3kg won't slow you down too much, not with an extra 250+watts giving you power.
When I lose 5+kg it's noticeable but 250 watts is like 100% extra most peoples cruising power....

When I get passed doing my local bike trail(40 miles) It's 2 people. Road bikers going a mph or two faster, or e-bikers doing 3+mph faster with no effort.
>>
>>2007459
looks like a piece of shit desu
>>
can you replace/upgrade the free hub that uses bearings to one that uses sealed bearings? is it possible to get one that has more pawls i.e. 3 > 6 pawls? If the measurements line up that is.

t.newfag
>>
>>2007575
>2007575
>can you replace/upgrade the free hub that uses bearings to one that uses sealed bearings?

Not afaik. Even if there is some appropriate product or kit, it would be a colossal pain in the ass. You'd have to remove the internal bearing race and could easily damage the hub.

>is it possible to get one that has more pawls i.e. 3 > 6 pawls?

Different hub designs have different numbers of pawls but I don't know if that info is readily available. Maybe check service manuals and such.
>>
>>2007575
It would be cheaper to buy a different hub
>>
>>2007577
>>2007579
I see. Thanks. Buying a new hub.
>>
>>2007591

You can't just like swap out a hub btw. No guarantees the spokes are even compatible. Wheelbuilding is not something a newfren ought to attempt.
>>
are they right? is this really all i need?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ztuq__qDJk
>>
>>2007605
>QRs in 2024
>IS mount brakes
>can't run a 50/34 front
>cant take sweet jumps
also build kit is mediocre for the price
you could get marin with sora or advent for about the same price
it really is just the cheapest surly
>>
>>2007598
>>
>>2007624

it really doesn't. the overwhelming majority of cyclists, literally above 99%, will never need to touch a spoke wrench or even know what that is.
>>
>>2007628
Obviously the context was about those 1% who do have an interest in wheel building, like apparently anon above. Nobody learns how to rebuild a wheel by not doing it, so might as well get to learning. Don't be a crab in a bucket. Just because you can't do it doesn't mean other people can't learn.
>>
>>2007635
>Don't be a crab in a bucket.

Bucket crabbing is my raison d'etre bud
Why else would I be on 4chan anno 2024
>>
There's a place near me that recycles old steel bikes and even gives some for free. Not sure how feasible it is but I'd like to pick one up and learn basic bike building stuff and the goal is to convert one as a gravel bike with standard gravel thru axles and a T47 bb. What should I look out for an old quality robust steel frame? Any noteworthy brands and models?
>>
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Hi guys, I'm the autist who rided underinflated. I bought a foot pump with a gauge on a second-hand site. Will post a pic when I receive my phone.
>>
>>2007638
Forgot to post video, that's what I'm aiming to do

https://youtu.be/WDkYQHh_scU?si=DjgvdteiSN4BpiTr
>>
>>2007638
>the goal is to convert one as a gravel bike with standard gravel thru axles

can't be done. classic steel won't fit gravel bike tires period, and afaik there's no way to convert oldschool dropouts to thru-axle. if you want to try your hand at bike building stuff you would be better off buying and assembling a tubeset.
>>
>>2007641
>classic steel won't fit gravel bike tires period
wrong
>if you want to try your hand at bike building stuff you would be better off buying and assembling a tubeset.
fantasy comment
>>
>>2007639
Imagine the stench...
>>
>>2007642

just because some tuber with decades of experience and thousands of expert opinions on tap made it work well enough to slap together a hideous frankenbike doesn't mean it is practical. you do you.
>>
>>2007639
I hornee

Does going from a 14mm inner width rim to an 18mm mean my 24mm tire will inflate bigger?? How does this work.
>>
>>2007647

it is so complicated that I don't know of any resource for explaining in detail. If you increase inner width you do increase tire volume but you also change the shape of the tire which changes everything about the way the bike rides. for MTB tires this is sometimes a good choice, but for narrow road bike tires you are dramatically increasing the chance of sidecuts and I don't think you would increase your cornering performance or ride quality enough to offset that.
>>
>>2007646
you don't get to speak about what is 'practical' or not after trolling him with 'you would be better off assembling a tubeset' lmao
>>
>>2007650
>'you would be better off assembling a tubeset'

brazing together a tubeset is something anyone can do
>>
>>2007651
what are 5 examples of things that not anyone can do?
>>
>>2007638
You shouldn't look for anything specific.
Just, something that would have been expensive once. So that has high spec tubing / high spec parts on it. You can gauge the relative quality/ value of a bike with some quick googling.
That is roughly in your size, and in a colour you like, and doesn't have a bent frame or fork.

Then you'd work out what kind of project might make sense. Don't go in with too many plans, work out what makes sense with the project you have, and the project you want is just one that is high end.

You may not find a cheap or free high end project at a recycler place, and if your aim is to buy a bunch of new parts then you absolutely need to start with something properly nice, otherwise it is not worth it.
>>
>>2007652
>what are 5 examples of things that not anyone can do?

I take your point, there are a lot of things that not just anyone can do. Assembling a frameset may seem inaccessible, may seem like not something that just anyone can do....

but it is a hell of a lot easier and more accessible than altering a bike boom frame into a modern gravel bike.
>>
>>2007654
who tf said bike boom frame? That would be a 70s gaspipe shitter.
He's looking at using a nice 80s/90s frame.

[building a frameset] is a hell of a lot easier and more accessible than [putting parts on a frameset]

uh no , that's not correct at all.
>>
>>2007655

okay. I'm not bike-god. I'll be here to fistpump your amazing project results.
>>
>>2007640
If you want a "gravel" build like that look for a mountain bike, which is shown in that video. Also look for hybrid bikes. Those can take wider tires and have relaxed geo.

The thumbnail shows the guy got a New fork, new bar,stem,drivetrain, and wheels.

So.... it's gonna cost you. Cheap way would be getting a MTB or hybrid and swapping the small things required, not going full balls to the wall.
>>
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>>2007656
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0QjhGr73Ns

you may enjoy this film about bicycles, if you can stomach the droll british commentary.
It shows some of the framebuilding process, and the process for drawing steel tubing at the columbus factory.

Framebuilding is incredibly skilled work, far beyond assembling a bicycle from parts. It also requires a number of expensive specialty tools.
>>
>>2007657
So in the, am I better financially to just build one from scratch? Or is it still cheaper to practice to try to nigger rig something rideable?
>>
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>>2007659
the thing to realize anon, is that 'gravel bike' is not a new concept.
They had bikes that were ideally suited for riding on gravel trails and offered a more relaxed ride on road, and a more extreme challenge on mtb trails, they had those in the 80s / 90s. They were called touring bikes, cyclocross, randonneur, hybrid, trekking, and mountain bikes.

If you can find a nice project, overhauling it and putting ~$200 of nice new consumables like tires, grips and cables, can absolutely make sense.
If you have specific aims like carrying stuff, getting wider gear range, or dialing the ergonomics/ fit for yourself, modifying it makes sense.
If things are worn out like the wheels, you open up modifying it quite a lot.
It is not worth arbitrarily modernizing a bike or copying someone else's reddit build. Things like a disc conversion probably aren't realistic or sensible, and changing to a different bottom bracket standard makes absolutely no sense and would be next to impossible.

It really depends on if you can find a nice project. Do not spend much money on something basic. If you find a basic bike that you kinda like, it is worth overhauling, but such a bike is not a good base for a 'custom build', unless that custom build is clearing out your cheap parts.

Most of working on bikes is cleaning stuff and patiently servicing it, so if you're lazy and envision it as more like playing with legos, which you buy shiny and new and which all slot together perfectly, i would suggest a different hobby.
>>
>>2007659
The cheapest play would be getting an older hybrid or mtb. Complete. Oh, and old touring bikes can work too.
If it's a hybrid I would get drop bars, new levers, new shifters, and probably if required new cassette, rd, new tires too

If mtb same as above. Just more capable off road, but heavier and slower on the streets.


If you deal hunt, learn and DIY it can be done cheap, but it takes knowledge and research. Also, the modern "standards" will be hard to fulfill and won't improve your ride that much(imo).
I would get a bike you like, fix/clean/restore. Ride for a bit, then decide how important the next step/conversion is and do that.
>>
>>2007659

old bike geometry and fit are absolutely nothing at all like new bike geometry and fit. if you want a gravel bike buy a gravel bike. you can't hack a 70's, 80's, or 90's bike into a gravel bike without spending more than a gravel bike would cost and leaving performance and utlity on the table.
>>
>>2007664
>you can't hack a 70's, 80's, or 90's bike into a gravel bike
The fuck even does this mean? A bike that's good on gravel?

That's not true at all. Most of the performance of a bicycle comes from having fast tires and wheels.
You can absolutely run the highest spec 35mm gravel tires on nice road wheels. With or without tubes.

Nice used rim brake wheels are difficult to acquire but not expensive.
Steel bike can be 10 kg pretty easily. That's the same weight as a $1000 gravel bike.

The limitation is that 35mm 700c tires are miserable on badly washboarded gravel or rough mtb trails, especially loaded with touring gear, and that for 90s mtbs, 26" tires are fun on trails but slow on the road.
And you can't bomb down mtb trails in the same way on rim brakes as on disc, however, a properly optimized old brake system can work very well.

35 mm are also much faster on the road than the 50 mm tires that gravelfags all run these days, so if your touring involves long road sections, they are superior, and can be perfectly enough offroad.

TONNES of classic bikes will fit 35mm tires. Including all 27" bikes. Because 700c is a smaller wheel standard, if you find a nice 27" bike, it automatically will fit wide modern tires, with different wheels & brakes.
Braking setup is good there too, either use mafac cantis with kool stop pads, or long reach modern dual pivots. Wa la it's a gravel bike.

>old bike geometry and fit are absolutely nothing at all like new bike geometry and fit.
nonsense. You can pretty easily get a quill stem - threadless adapter, and play with modern 31.8 bars / stems until you dial it in and can order nice silver parts, actual quill stem, which will put the contact points in the same place.
>>
>>2007667

all wrong, I won't even bother. buy an ad.
>>
>>2007668
an ad for what lol
>>
>>2007667
>mafac cantis
*mafac centerpulls
>>
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>>2007638
Other guy is right that your goals of "thru axel and bb" are dumb. Your bike is either qr or thru axel and trying to change that is dumb af.

But he's wrong in that old steel can't fit big tires. Most old road bikes definitely can't go big..but there's a huge range of old steel, you could find a nice old tourer which would easily fit 38's. Or a 27 inch rim roadie which would take bigger tires if you dropped to 700c. Finally, you could always look into a 650b conversion of you find a truly special frame. But be sure to measure a lot before you go to all THAT trouble...

Your goal is fundamentally gold, and if this place specalizes in steel frames I'm sure you'll be spoiled for choice. My recommendation is to find a touring frame with cantilevers brake mounts and go from there. Will give you a robust frame that fits big tires with least amount of hassle
>>
>>2007598
Ah yes. I'm buying new spokes and getting it serviced.
>>
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>>2007654
Hard disagree
You must be tripping, there's a reason why you are a million and one gravel conversions of vintage bikes these days.

Like wtf do you seriously believe it's easier to learn how to braise a new bicycle frame, compared to just slapping new parts on an old bike? Standards haven't changed that much, if you get the right bike you can fit many modern parts on an old frame
>>
>>2007668
He's got valid points. Nigger.
>>
>>2007674

You're right. I have seen the error of my ways. I await the conversion pics of your 1995 whatever-bike into a 2024 gravel bike. I enjoy the taste of crow and bike-crow even moreso.
>>
>>2007667
>Most of the performance of a bicycle comes from having fast tires and wheels.
Wrong, 100% of the performance of the bicycle is the rider's legs and handles
>>
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>>2007454
Is there any advantage on using a smaller front gear? I'm about to change mine from wear damage and was thinking about getting a smaller one. Of course I know the ratio will change but besides that is there any other noticeable change?
>>
>>2007455
I weight 120kg and never wondered this. Have always assumed any bike could handle me as they are made of metal.
>>
>>2007682
More ground clearence for grinds or other tricks you may do on that 24? 26? bmx.
If anything bigger sprockets are more efficient and wear slower so are generally better unless you need more gearing for hills, in which case smoll is good.
>>
>>2007678
Wrong, 100% of the performance of the bicycle is the wattage of the motor
>>
>>2007682
No there's nothing you need to actually worry about, except if your bike is single you'll need to add tension to your chain or remove a link. Other guy is technically right about bigger chainrings being more efficient but that's a matter of 0-1 watts
>>
>>2007682
More friction, more wear, less weight, more clearance, less ratio (the only important consideration really).
>>
>>2007454
The threaded headset on my 80s MTB continuously comes loose no matter how much I tighten it. How do I fix this? It's a tange headset.
>>
>>2007729
Does it have a lockring.......
>>
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I was looking to install a rear bike rack on my bike but I wasn't sure if I needed to get a specific size since I have a 20 inch frame and the specs for the rack says it fits most 26-29 inch frame bicycles
>>
>Aventon Pace 500.2
or
>Aventure 1

I live in the city, my commute is roughly 2.5 miles or 5 miles round trip and my area can be pretty hilly.

I like the added torque on the Aventure because that will help me get up hills, but I'm worried that the weight and width will make it unruly while weaving through busy bike trails and sidewalks.
>>
>Chinese drone maker DJI is now making e-MTB motors and control systems
>they're just ebikes with fancy touchscreen control now, but next year, it will have integrated camera drone control

Mountain bike content on YouTube is about to be even more insufferable.
>>
>>2007774
the writer is retarded but what they mean is the rack fits frames with 26" wheels, 29" wheels (which is the same as 700c) and any wheel sizes in between.
so that's you, unless you're on a Brompton or something
>>
>>2007781
thanks a ton!
>>
>>2007729
Did you service it (clean and re-grease)?

If a headset is loose it usually needs a service.
I suspect you also simply don't understand how to lock it. You hold the cup in place with one wrench and then tighten the lockring against it.

Again, harder to do if you haven't cleaned/ greased the threads on the steerer.
>>
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https://sports.yahoo.com/vlasov-crashes-during-stage-9-145236429.html

>rider gets run off the road and falls over
>lands on the grass
>never contacts another rider or any hard obstacle
>literally every tube on the frame including the seatpost snaps in half

Would an aluminum bike even have cared?
>>
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>>2007774
those racks are shit. You should try to buy one that does not have adjustable lowers.
It's just an extra place for flex and failure.
>>
>>2007787
pretty high speed crash m8 and he bounces on the road

any race frame woulda been likely to die. Hell you can put a dent in a nice allum frame by flicking it hard enough.
>>
>>2007790
>Hell you can put a dent in a nice allum frame by flicking it hard enough.
yeah no
>>
>>2007787
>bike from a company known for making bad design trade-offs and having bad quality control
>completely disintegrates over minor crash
>umm, it can't be the bike's fault because the MSRP is over $12,000

Do Freds cry to the paramedics to not blame their snapped carbon bikes as they draw their last breaths?
>>
>>2007787
I don't understand how people are happy riding trail/enduro/dh on a carbon bike which you WILL crash regularly no matter how skilled and you are
>>
>>2007810
Most people haven't broken their frames yet, or if they did they learned.
Aluminum frames were broken in those disciplines too, and luckily we have the option to get those instead of top spec carbon if we want.

So far my carbon and aluminum stuff has held up.
>>
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>>2007810
They have bigger things to worry about than a cracked frame.
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>>2007810
>I don't understand how people are happy riding trail/enduro/dh on a carbon bike which you WILL crash regularly

the carbon breakage meme is just well poisoning.
>>
>>2007787
the tracking shot makes it look like hes going slower
look how fast the cars and other riders pass him when hes stationary
>>
>>2007790
>you can put a dent in a nice allum frame by flicking it hard enough
nice bait
>>2007802
is specialised really that bad compared to other companies? i was under the impression that it's all pretty much from the same factories and the only major difference is the price you pay for brand value.
>>2007813
why hit the front brake so hard?
>>
>>2007788
I'll try to get this one day but that's way out of my budget rn
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How much of a difference does tire size make when it comes to speed and pedaling?

I'm looking at two hybrid bikes, Trek Verve and Specialized Roll. The Verve has 1.7 inch tires while the Roll has 2.3. The Roll tires seem strangely thick for this type of bike. Is it going to run slower? Will I have to pedal harder for the same outcome or anything like that? Sorry, I'm fairly new to the bike scene.
>>
>>2007894
Larger tires have two issues.
Aerodynamically worse via being way larger then rim. Sluggish feeling because you have extra mass at the furthest part of the tire, and more rubber(generally, unless you buy fancy rene herse/xc mtb/ racing tires) so you have more frictional loss between the tube, tire, and ground.

Specialized has a very slack seat angle so you better like that.
DESU that's a bigger deal IMO
I would go for the trek unless you are too stupid to use a front derailleur.
>>
>look up bikes
>50% more expensive than when I bought in 2019
Yeah I'm thinking it's time for an OVERHAUL and not a new bike, lads.
>>
>>2007895
Sorry for the dumb question but what is a slack seat angle?

I actually test rode both bikes, but I rode them in two completely different environments, so I couldn't tell what was a result from my environment, and what was just part of the bike.

Things I noticed:
>Verve
Felt a bit more fast and nimble, very easy to ride. Although I rode it on smoother terrain.
>Roll
Much more comfortable to sit on and just clicked with me. But I had to put more effort into peddling and couldn't go as fast as I wanted. I felt limited. I wasn't sure if it was the thicker tires or the terrain.

Is this just a matter of speed vs comfort? Not that I was uncomfortable on the Verve, but the Roll felt amazing to use and had a higher quality feel to it. I love that the Verve had more oomph and I could ride around easily and quickly, except it felt more cheap or something, I don't know how to describe it. My main use for the bike would be riding it around town and some commuting. I don't plan on bike trails or anything like that.
>>
>>2007894
>How much of a difference does tire size make when it comes to speed and pedaling?
bigly

>>2007895
aero isn't a thing on hybrids, tard.

>>2007897
>what is a slack seat angle?
Basically how far back you're reclining while sitting on it. The tube with the seatpost on it is angled back more on the grey one, plus it has riser bars so you'll be sitting way the fuck back on it compared to the Trek, which isn't a good or bad thing, just a preference.

>Not that I was uncomfortable on the Verve, but the Roll felt amazing to use and had a higher quality feel to it. I love that the Verve had more oomph and I could ride around easily and quickly, except it felt more cheap or something, I don't know how to describe it.
The trek has some cheapshit parts on it while the stuff on the specialized is cheaper but not garbage. 1x7 drivetrain with an 11-34 cassette might be a bit limiting if you have big hills, but a triple front with Tourney derailleur is just going to be pain. It'll go out of adjustment in a week and stop working worth a crap, then you'll stop using it altogether and end up basically only having a single gear in front anyway.
>>
>>2007894
Do you really want a slow cruiser?

This 'comfort' position is useless for real riding.
At higher speeds, or, into a headwind, (so basically on the flat), air resistance is a huge factor in your speed, and being that upright makes you incredibly inefficient.
You also can't climb hills without fucking up your back, because you're too cramped to stretch out properly.

You should look for a fit that allows you to have the handlebars at your correct saddle height. That is a good relaxed fit. Not significantly above it.

Actually a cruiser is great, they are fun to cruise on. I have a couple. But just know the right way to ride it is always slowly and getting off and walking up hills. If you think you'll want to actually try putting in effort ever then get something sportier.
I would say actually get a road bike but atleast get a sportier hybrid not a 'comfort' one for old ladies. You're gonna find dragging around 2" tires and through the air with maximum drag is not actually comfortable because it's so inefficient and you'll find it difficult to actually get anywhere.
>>
>>2007897
I'm not the same anon helping you out but simply
>Is this just a matter of speed vs comfort?
yes, it is but don't think big tires will slow you down that much, it just takes time to gain the muscle to ride them as fast. The most important thing about choosing a bike is how it feels and your test ride seems to steer your towards the Roll, maybe go for another ride and think about it harder
>>
>>2007907
I'll be riding around town in mostly flat areas, so hills are pretty much irrelevant. Also, I kind of like the upright position of the Roll. I hate the bikes where you have lean over, but the Verve seems a bit upright and you can even adjust the handlebars on the 2.0.

Basically, I think I'm looking for something akin to a Dutch bike or a Japanese bike. I haven't ever ridden one, but to my understanding they're sort of a casual upright bike but they're fast and efficient, especially with those thin tires. Is that all true? If so, would the Verve or the Roll be closer to that?
>>
>>2007908
>it just takes time to gain the muscle to ride them as fast
Yeah that's true, but it still kind of gives me a headache to think about how it's restricting me. However you're right that the feel is most important and I definitely do enjoy the feel of it.
>>
>>2007911
>but they're fast and efficient
yeah so you do not want one of those bikes. They are not fast or efficient. The riding position is awful for that. They are for cruising slowly.
>>
>>2007911
>I hate the bikes where you have lean over
There's a large middleground between super aggressive fits and bikes designed for literal grandmas.

Following your instincts of whats 'comfortable' for a couple laps of a parking lot to a casual is not going to lead you to a comfortable bike to actually ride.

Cruisers are fine but when you start saying you want it to be fast then just forget about it. You want something else.
>>
>>2007911
based future upright cruiser. your instincts are correct, its the best way to get around. hugging the handlebars is for lycrafags
>>
>>2007911
>I'll be riding around town in mostly flat areas, so hills are pretty much irrelevant.

It's not just hills either, it's riding out of the saddle generally. For riding you want your shoulder rolled forward and an arch in your back.
The bolt upright flat back cruiser position is not good for putting any effort in and you will fuck up your bike trying to ride hard on a cruiser. It's cramped.
>>
>>2007915
Oh they're not? I always thought they were because of the thin tires, and I remember when visiting Japan years ago, people would occasionally zoom by on bikes at pretty decent speeds.
>>2007916
I see. I guess I'm not sure what I want then. I want something comfy to ride around town in an upright posture and enjoy the day, but I also like going at decent speeds. I don't want to casually stroll like I'm on the beach or something.
>>
>>2007921
if you know anyone that has junk bikes these types are fun to build
>old steel mtb frame appropriate for your size
>wider fat seat
>flat tires
>swept back handlebars or something similar to bmx
>whatever bags and racks you can put on it, i've literally ziptied a wicker basket to the front once
3sp igh is great for pretty flat areas too
>>
>>2007894
buy the bike you want and ride it.
if the tires are not doing something you need them to do, buy a set that will.
swapping tires is easy. but if you buy a bike because of tires, keeping the tires and changing the rest of the bike is obviously retarded
>>
Are SRAM 4 piston brakes just super shitty or something? I see used sets listed everywhere only for under $100, even ones that are stripped from a new bike.
>>
>>2007459
>Hengtai motor
>Customized
Good luck dealing with a busted clutch assembly or hub bearing every few months with unrepairable proprietary parts. Super73's overpriced slop uses "customized" hub motors from the same company and now their bikes are known for having the most fragile motors on the market with parts you can't replace off the shelf because it's all propietary.
>>
Bought a used bike yesterday. Haven't had a bike in a long time. I don't remember it being this fucking hard and sweaty to ride a bike. Is it because this bike only has 3 gears and I'm used to having more gears?
>>
>>2007949
That, it's hot, and you are weak/unaccustomed to riding again.
If you are going fast it could be the gears.
Could also do basic checks on the bike to see/feel if you have any mechanical issues slowing you down.
Oh, and check your tire pressure if it's really low.
If the chain isn't lubed maybe do that.
>>2007911
Seems you like the roll more, so get that. Ride it for a bit and then see if you want to make it go faster or not. Luckily you adapt quickly to a bike and gain a lot of fitness over the first couple weeks of dedicated riding.
>>
>>2007949
Could be the gearing, depends where you're riding. I just got a mtb a month ago after not riding for 10+ years and the climbs that were almost killing me are no problem now. Keep at it and you'll get better quickly.
>>
>>2007949
No it fucking sucks right now. I have a modern-ish (2019) carbon road bike and I hate riding but I also hate not riding so I do it anyway and kill 2L of water in 45 minutes and go home early
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>>2007963
It's why I ride at 5:30am and get home before 10
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This cable fucker keeps backing out of its little holder. Is there a more reasonable way to fix this in place before I zip tie the fuck out of it.
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>>2007971
Tighten the adjuster so it presses harder against the housing?
Otherwise zip ties are fine. I use them on plenty of bikes like when the housing is smol and rattles around.
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>>2007972
No, if anything I need to take it back down as because I already tries adjusting the cable tension. Zip ties it is then, I guess I'll show off once my elbows heal. Trek FX 1, btw.
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>>2007974
Only other option I can think of is get a housing ferrule that still fit's your housing but is larger and fits the cable stop better.
zip ties are better imo.
>>
>>2007971
the outer is too short
if you dont want to redo it you could try replacing the endcap with one that has a larger diameter or try wrapping it in teflon tape
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>>2007977
I get triggered when I run into shit like this. Then after a while I cope and curse.
>>
>>2007971
It should be held in place by the spring tension of your brake arms and your brake lever.

There doesn't have to be a tight press fit with brake ferrule stops and often there isn't.

Either your cables have excess friction, or your brake arms/calipers/whatever are sticking. The way to tell this is to unclamp the cable at your brake, then see if the brake arms pivot smoothly and return with springs, and see if the pieces of your housing, now free from the stops, will slide around smoothly (don't pull housing off the end of the steel cable, it won't go back on a frayed cable).

both are usually easy to lube back up good
>>
>>2007981
The rear brake assy moves smoothly, but there does seem to be quite a bit of drag in the cable housing. Would straight mineral oil work as a good lube, or is there something better?
>>
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>>2007983
That would be fine. I use LPS-1.
A spray lube with teflon in it would be good too.
Sewing machine oil is good, singer etc. That's a little thinner than your mineral oil.

If the housing is totally fucked it's necessary to recable but lube usually works.
>>
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What actually determines wether or not your 700c frame can fit 650b wheels?
>>
>>2007983
Not him but I use my atf/acetone mix, but most shit seems to help. Helps way more then you would expect too.
>>2007990
>disk bike
it fits
>rim brake bike
can you get calipers that reach the rim?
That's really it.
>>
>>2007990
You need a big tyre to make 650b the same diameter as 700c
For example 700x35c - 2168mm
27.5 x 2.1 - 2148mm
So you need to be to clear a 2 inch tires
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>>2007990
See >>2007993, he's right. But if you're talking about if it's WORTH fitting 650b, the question is does the smaller wheels mean you can fit bigger tires?

And the answer is, do your seat/chain stays and fork widen much as the go down towards the dropouts? Just measure your frame a few inches back from your 700c tire and see if a bigger tire could fit. Generally speaking with disc a 650b would fit but if you can't get bigger tires on what's the point??
>>
got a 2023 cannondale trail 5 in size M(44cm) but im a midget so it was either an S(42) with 27.5 or the M with 29ers
what can i do to sit more upright? i think im leaning forward quite a bit
>>
Does electric motor redundant for food delivery courier?
>>
>>2008020
Move stem up the steerer tube, shorter stem, and riser bars(bmx style).
27.5 is fine and may have fit you better
>>2008021
I mean e-bikes make it easier and make lots of sense if you are trying to save money on gas but still get places fast.
>>
>>2008022
ok i'll try that
i wanted 29ers because im mostly doing road and xc
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>>2008021
not really, unless you really like the exercise an electric motor is much more convenient for most.
>>
>>2008023
Main downfall of 27.5 vs 29 is flat speed and roll over advantages. Downside is 29 is heavier and less nimble. For most smaller people smaller wheels make sense. It helps the bike designers to not compromise on geometry. Used to be a big issue with road bikes in the 48cm or smaller size.

You will be fine on either, but if the 27.5 actually fits it will be a better ride. Since bad fit is just uncomfortable and makes it less fun.
>>
>>2008035
yeah i get that, and i shouldve went and tried some bikes in a shop near me
but i found this one online for 50% off and i just bought it on impulse
it wasnt really that uncomfortable and probably just me not being used to riding a mountainbike
>>
>>2008037
Ah, a deal.
You can also just ride it more. I would say do around 5-10 1hr+ rides to know and adjust.
>>
>>2007949
there's also the possibility that your old bike fit you well and this one doesn't, like maybe your joints are super cramped or the reach is really long and pulling your body unnaturally.
if you don't know about bike fit fundamentals and you bought something blindly, it *could* be that. and there may be fixes for it.
but it's probably what other anons said
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>>2007949
maybe youre just out of shape?
today i rode a bike for the first time again after years of neetmaxxing
had to stop after 1km because my legs were turning into wet noodles and i was about to vomit
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>>2008055
It won't take you long to build back to 20 mile rides, keep at it.
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>>2008056
ty, will do!
had to deal with this before when i had to bike to work with a single speed citybike
first few days i had to call in sick because i got so nauseous that i had to turn around halfway there
but after a few weeks i was riding the whole way without breaking a sweat
>>
>>2008037
I'm in the process of doing what >>2008038
says on a new build. I carry allen wrenches with me and go for long rides. after I get warmed up, from a ballpark seat adjustment, I tinker around with height/fore-and-aft,/angle and see if its better or worse. fore-and-aft and height affect each other, so you have to account for that and try lots of stuff. angle can affect how much body weight is on the handlebar i.e. sore arms. also play around with stem height but you can't do it on the fly if it's a modern threadless stem, you have to put spacers. the handlebar in the clamp can be rolled forwards and backwards unless it's a perfectly straight flat bar, and afterwards you probably have to move the brakes/ shifters. this is a bigger deal with drop bars but any sweep on a flat bar can be rolled although don't go too nuts, it should sweep mostly back; don't roll it more than, say, 45° either way, probably less.
stem length may need changing but you have to buy a new stem, nbd but it's hard to know what's what until you ride it. I found an adjustable stem at the co-op and fucked with that and then measured what I liked and bought a regular stem for that measurement. also you can do riser bars like anon said.
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>>2008060
I have experienced this also. was a strong rider, then had mental problems and couldn't leave the house for about a year. after treatment, started commuting to new job like always and I could do it, but very noticeably weak and slow and wore out. but after like a month I was back to normal
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>>2008061
forgot to say start with fore-and-aft in the dead center and avoid either extreme. you may think you need it slammed all the way back but I tried that and years later realized it was garbage then had to redo my height and everything. in my experience get the height first then try the fore-and-aft one direction a little at a time until you really feel it's off, then dial it back and then try it the other way. THEN you may have to do the height a little. rinse and repeat.
>>
>>2007454
The chain makes the whole picture sad.
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>>2008064
The knee over pedal axle is a better starting point imo because one saddle's dead center (going by rail markings) can have you in a wildly different position than another.
>>
>>2008068
eh, true dat.
the seat post set-back is usually a cm or two but some are more and some are zero so yeah, I didn't account for that in my post. and frame geometry puts the BB differently relative to the saddle.
only thing about KOPS is you need a friend to do the measurement. if you're by yourself starting from center isn't a bad place to start but radical setback or geo will make that harder.
>>
As I understand, 2x setup limits tire clearance. What's the maximum you can have? I've never seen bikes with +2.4" tires with 2x setups

>t.brainlet
>>
>>2008075
It doesn't limit it much, but it may. I have only fit 2.35 and 2.4's on my hardcore hardtail since that is enough for me, and it's 2x.

The 2 things to watch out for are the clamp piece of the FD, and the arm.
A 2x has chainrings to the right, and left of where a 1x is, but that improves/reduces cross chaining.

If you can run 1x with 3.0's you can probably run 2x with 2.9 on the same bike. That would be my estimation.
>>
>>2008075
>What's the maximum you can have?
It depends greatly on the chainstay length and the chainline of the drivetrain.
>>
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>>2008077
>>2008091
I ask this because I ordered a custom bike from a local framebuilder. The goal was to have a steel version of a Salsa Cutthroat but a bit more gravel geometry (instead of MTB like salsa). He did a great job overall but I feel like the chainring are too close to the chainstays. Max clearance on rear tire is like 2.35", he explained to me how he can't really do bigger with 2x setups. T47 92mm bb with a 47/31 crankset and 11-36 cassette with I think 425mm chainstays

Pic 1
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>>2008098
Pic 2

There's about 6mm space between the chainstay and the bigger ring and about 3-4mm with the smaller ring. How much should I worry about the crank flexing enough that it might damage the frame?
>>
>>2008101
Fuck sorry I don't know why it keeps inverting my pics
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>>2008098
They are supposed to be close. He is correct you would need longer chainstays OR wider BB.
Theoretically a fatbike bb with a width of 121mm would help.
I can measure my bikes clearence in a bit and take a pic
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>>2008105
Ah I see. I did mention him that I wanted chainstays as short as possible with 2.4" tires. I learned quite a lot about bikes during the building process and came to the realization that you can't have a do it all bike, the range of things I wanted my bike to do was maybe too much and every bike is a compromise. Here's a pic of my bike
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>>2008108
Yeah that's asking a lot for a bike with such big chainrings , and what I presume are 29in wheels

Here is my now vintage 26in hardtail
410mm chainstays, 26x2.5in vittoria morsas.
I think 73mm bb, but could be 83mm. Crank is spaced pretty far out and I am running isis drive cranks.
22,32 chainrings
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>>2008101
I have a fair amount of space, even with ISCG 05 tabs with a roller. Again, though this has 22/32 rings so they are teeny tiny compared to 31/47
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>>2008112
Yes exactly those are 29ers 2.25" tires. Yeah it's pretty close too but I imagine 26" wheels help you get more clearance
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>>2008108
Full bike here. Did 2 seasons of DH with my friend and it's been mostly sitting. Seat looks jank so I probably need to adjust it, but man this thing is fun.
>>
how stupid would it be to buy a frameset and build a gravel bike using old bike's parts?
I kinda like the idea, but it would make more sense to sell old bike and buy a new.

biggest hurdle is probably routing cables and setting up hydraulic brakes.
>>
>>2008115
Steel frame? I like the simple lines of old school bikes. Modern aluminium/carbon are too convoluted and not as durable because gotta consooooom
>>
>>2008108
nice dude, that looks sick. i think that chainring clearance is fine. who knows, maybe you'll even go 1x in the future and then it won't be as close. but still, i think it's OK as it is. does it hit the frame? if not, that's good to me.
>>
>>2008119
it depends if the old parts are OK and whether or not you like them. i think both routes are totally valid.
>>
>>2008120
yup, good ole steel
>>2008119
Not stupid at all if you have parts that you really like and fit a modern/semi-modern frame. Of course if you want to learn more stuff as well.
>>
>>2008122
>>2008123
parts work but they're not amazing. 5000km old grx400 2x10 and 17mm rims. I'm not happy with bike's geometry and it doesn't really have much resale value.
that's why I'm thinking about getting a full steel frameset, salvage what I can and make upgrades in the future.
>>
>>2007491
>>2007496

Thanks Anons! I rotated them and way less brake noise.
>>
>>2007654
Yeah no, you’ve obviously never assembled an outdated bike in any decade
>>
Is there a "best" helmet to get? I never wore one before, but, I had a bad accident and definitely decided to get one. Yes I know I'm a fucking retard for not wearing one before. I've heard MIPS helmets are the good ones but idk where to look or get. Should I just go to my local and ask whats what? also how expensive are they anyway?
>>
>>2008183
https://www.helmet.beam.vt.edu/bicycle-helmet-ratings.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKbYaOiz5U4

Supposedly these guys do real tests. All I can say is I blacked out wearing a cheap helmet but it had a massive crack and I was going 15-20mph offroad in a race when it happened.
Only time I don't wear one is in my cul de sac adjusting fit on new bikes or testing them.

Besides that I recommend hitting your local bike shop and putting some on your head. It needs to feel decent otherwise you won't wear it, and it's better if you like your helmet design to. I wear glasses so mtb helmets with visors are nice to keep the sun out of my eyes.
>>
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>>2007454
Hey guys! It's me: peak niche entertainment guy again!
I want to thank y'all for the advice about cadence that you gave me last time. Now I'm spending 90% of my time in 6th instead of 7th gear. It took a bit of practice but now I'm spinning my legs like a helicopter. At first it felt like I was going "slower" than when at harder gears but I feel like I can go further and ride for longer when I'm not powering high torque.
Here's my question: I currently have a 40t max 11t min 8 speed rear cassette. I am thinking of replacing it with a 32t max 11t min (also 8 speed). The mechanic at the bike shop showed me how my derailer works and basically the fact that my largest gear is a 40 means that the derailer can't wrap my smaller gears as tight because of geometry and shit. He said if I drop down to a smaller max he could adjust the arm to wrap the smaller gears more gooder. I now realize that the chain was periodically skipping on those smaller gears because I was doing too much torque and not enough cadence. Still I would like the closer gear ratios for smoother shifting, and I'm not really sure that I need a 40t max. My second largest is a 34t right now and I've been practicing with it going up hill and it seems like I can manage with a 32t max. There are a couple hills on the trail I ride on that are legit 45° where even the 40t is such a pain in the ass that I would rather get off the bike and walk it up the cliff for 2 minutes. What do you guys think? Did I misunderstand something? It would be incredibly cheap to swap my casette. What do you guys think?
>>
>>2008195
cassette swap seems logical since a 11-40t 8 speed cassette is a WIDE boi. most 11-42t cassettes are 10-11 speed and those still have large jumps, so I can understand you wanting a tighter cassettes. Especially if you are light/strong/like to stand you don't need super low gears.

Actually BITD most 8 speed cassettes were 11-32max or tighter, we just ran 2x or 3x to get back the range.

If you want overall more speed and to shift the whole range harder a bigger chainring would work too., this would only be useful if you want more gears harder then the 11t you currently have.
>>
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>>2008022
>>2008061
>>2008064
>>2008068
tried pulling up the stem but it didnt move, only left and right. so im guessings its fixed and i need a riser? picrel is what it looks like
also moved the seat forward by a centimeter and thats a bit better, now my knees are exactly above the pedals
>>
>>2008200
The stem moves up if you loosen the allen bolt on the top cap, then pull a spacer sitting above the stem to underneath.
Now that is based on if you have a spacer on top of your stem, if not you would need a riser stem, or a shorter stem.
Post actual bike when you have time for us to be more direct in the answer.
>>
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>>2008201
it seems like all the spacers are already underneath on my bike
pulled the cap off and there wasnt much stem left so im guessing i need a riser or something?
>>
>>2008203
Yup, riser stem if you want rise. Shorter stem if you want less reach.

Watch out for your cables. Too much rise and the cables will be taught and you won't be able to turn well.

Oh, and make sure you measure the bar interface and steerer tube to get the right size. Looks like a 1 1/8in steerer and a 31.8mm handlebar but I could be wrong.
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>>2008199
I see. I think there must be regulations on how steep roads can be because I haven't encountered a road that I had to use the 40t on yet. The thing about wide shifts is true :(
I sometimes shift and it clunks so loud that I'm afraid the chain came off for a second. Having the smoother shifts would be so nice! With that I've made up my mind! Thank you for the advice!

Also I think in ready for a rear rack at this point. I've been putting in 20km rides 3 or 4 times a week and I'm feeling confident enough to try commuting to work. Thing is that I don't want to wear a backpack and I need a decent amount of storage. Pic related is what my rear looks like. There are these two little screw holes above my skewer. Can I mount a rear rack to those and to my seatpost (I don't have any other mounting holes that I could find)? I would like to have a really sturdy rack that could carry a panier with my laptop and books. I need it to be sturdy because I ride my bike off road a lot. Thank God I didn't get a full sus because I would be jumping it out of airplanes! Does anybody have suggestions or examples of hardtail rear racks? Can those screw holes in pic be used to mount a rack or would they be too small and weak to handle off road?
>>
>>2008210
Shit I just realized the camera focus was fucked. Sorry! You can still kinda see the screw hole in question. I wonder if its not for mounting racks then what is it even for? Fenders? Also that's not jizz on the right I promise!
>>
>>2008210
Yes those screw holes are designed for racks, they mount there and at the seatpost.
I would be tempted to go to that bikeshop from before and ask them about one that will fit.

Oh, and for the shifting thing try and ease off the power when you do it, both up and down gears. Keep spinning the cranks but ease off a little and it should clunk less, but going to harder gears it will still do it a little. One advantage to high cadence is your gear shifts are easier and quicker that way.
>>
>>2008210
Also judging by how your cassette looks for sure go with a smaller range of gears. You spend 75%+ of your time in the hardest 3 or 4 gears indicated by the lube on your chain.
>>
>>2008213
Thank you for your wisdom! I got the bike at a small bike shop they don't have a huge selection of racks, they only have racks and fenders that are fit for road bikes. I'm calling around right now to see if there is a bike shop that specializes in MTB, maybe they would have the seatpost attaching rack? Also is the distance between the holes universal? Do the racks adjust to fit different frame widths or something?
>High cadence low power shifting. I'll keep it in mind. Honestly I'm not a very good rider yet so I often find myself shifting too late when going uphill or something so I'm putting more torque than I should on the shift. I just need to shift ahead of time and be smarter.
>>2008215
Yeah I cycle for 1 hour on road to get to the trail where I go off road for like literally 20 seconds then cycle an hour back home in small gear xD
Such is life living in dystopian megacity.
I would say that I spend 90% of my time in 6th gear and the other 10% split between all the others.
>>
>>2008217
I am not sure if the rack eyelets are all the same near the dropouts, but they should be semi standardized. Sounds like you got it figured out.
>>
Thinking about buying this as a city getaround. Is the lefty fork harder to main or anything I should know about them? I think it looks cool although you have to swing the caliper up to remove the wheel.. On the other hand you can replace a tyre or tube without taking off the wheel.
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>>2008227
yes lefty fork is harder to maintain, but for city use it will take a long time to wear out or require maintenaince.
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>>2008119
It might cost you in specialized low-use case tools like a headset press but it's a good way to learn
>>
used road bike or new one from decathalon? the cheapest road bike at deca is 650 CAD and a good used road bike from like cannondale, trek, giant etc. is usually $400-600 if more than 3 years old, I can do minor maintenance like tube replacements but I have no tools or skill for drivetrain repair.
>>
>>2008249
>new bike pros
plenty of tire clearence, disk brakes, modern standards(will change in 4-5 years), warranty
>old bike pros
better quality parts, higher performance(lighter, better wheels, etc), might help you learn how to wrench

Your call. I only own used so that's my stance on it.
>>
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>>2007454
would it be possible to straighten this back out so that more of the seatpost can fit into the seat tube?
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>>2008200
you need to take a picture of this view and the side view of your actual bike. you may be able to flip the existing stem for more rise, and we need to see what's up with your spacers and stack
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>>2008260
i did take one from the side -> >>2008203
as for flipping the thing that will have to wait until tomorrow
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>>2008256
yes, just when it get tight going in the seattube use a light to confirm it's your post is still bent and might need some more work. Don't jam her in.
I use a vice
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>>2008249
personally I'd go used, it's a better bike and even if you have to take it to a shop for a tune-up, you're still coming out ahead. but as a noob you can't tell which particular bikes are good. you can ask here or there's a bike buy general. it has to be cool but also it has to fit you right but we can help you with that.
the yuros say decathlon is aight, though. but personally I'd go used but I've been fixing and tuning bikes for decades
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>>2008256
dog, I know other anon said yes but that sounds like a cluster fuck to me
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>>2008261
yeah sorry I was responding to the initial post I didn't see the follow up
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I'm in the market for my 1st road bike
Is this worth $2000? Apparently it's 2015 Emonda SL8 with repainted frame and r8000 ultegra cassette and rear derailleur

https://www.avito.ru/moskva/velosipedy/velosiped_trek_emonda_sl6_dura_ace_power_metre_4035974610

https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/road-bikes/performance-road-bikes/%C3%A9monda/%C3%A9monda-sl-8/p/16539/
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>>2008256
No, not really. Material has stretched where the bend is. While it's generally possible to 'shrink' material back in metalworking it wont happen here. The area around the bend will end up out of round and wont insert. Also 4130 doesn't take being cold set several times too kindly. And heat treat is out of the question too.
Why not just get a straight post to begin with ? For the cost of properly doing this you could buy countless seatposts.
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>>2008256
Not a chance. Bending tubing is sketchy as fuck (need to prevent is from buckling or collapsing) and you really don't wanna get reamed if it fails. Once you bent it, it's gonna lose all of its integrity.
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>>2008270
because I want a 4130 seatpost and I can't find a straight one to save my own life, or else I would just pay whatever it costs and be done with it
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>>2008269
no, and if you're buying your first road bike you shouldn't be trying to drop that much money unless you're borrowing somebody else's bike all the time and you damn well know you're into it. tons and tons of people drop obscene amounts of cash on shit they never even use, don't be one of those retards
>>
>>2008108
damn thats a sexy bicycle
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>>2008262
are you having a stroke? Dont give people advice that will literally get them killed, and at least use google translate if you can't form a sentence.
>>
>>2008283
Not my problem if he wants to try it out.
>>
>>2008284
words of a psychopath
>>
>>2007933
>Are SRAM 4 piston brakes just super shitty or something?

yeah
>>
>>2008283
it's fine, i'm not stupid enough to listen to that guy
>>
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>>2008210
There are a few things to consider when buying a rack.

Firstly, 'disc' racks.
The middle and right rack are 'disc' racks, meaning that they have a recessed bolt hole to work around a disc brake.
This means that the bolt is obscured, you can't tighten it with a multi tool, and if the head strips, it's more difficult to remove.
It's worth avoiding disc racks unless you actually need one. Looking at your pic it seems like a standard straight arm rack, like on the left, would work fine on your bike, because your disc brake is not really in the way.

Secondly, adjustable lower arms
The rack on the right has lower arms that can be adjusted up and down. This adds a point of flex and failure, and is also worth avoiding.
So then you'd want to chose a rack which is high enough to clear your mudguard. It's easy to measure that. Most 700c or 650 racks will do it.
It's nice to have a rack which is not too wide, or too high, although if they are extremely close you have to take more care loading them to not get stuff caught in the wheel.

Thirdly, dual rails
The rack on the left and the right have dual top rails. This means you can run panniers lower, and the panniers don't mar the racktop. This is a big advantage and a design of decent touring racks.

As for the upper struts, don't worry about it. You can attach them with p-clamps to your frame, or directly to your seatpost clamp. They can be bent. It's not a compatibility issue.
Width of the rack arms is also not an issue. You can just bend the rack to fit (actually bend it though, don't have the bolts bending it closed in tension).

As for getting a tighter cassette because your shifting skips and is rough, that is bizarre. You bought a stock bike right? The gearing should fucking work. You shouldn't have to modify it to make it work. I don't see why that mech can't shift a 40t cog. Sure winding your b spring in a bit will improve shifting but it shouldn't go from 'actual problems' to 'works correctly'.
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>>2008290
racks are gay
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>>2008279
>because I want a 4130 seatpost
retarded. Also, easy to fucking buy??
what size do you want because there are a shit tonne of common bmx sizes.
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>>2008292
27.2 and all the bmx ones I've seen in that size are bent
feel free to direct me to one for sale
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>>2008293
why do you even want this?
you have a steel stem and handlebar as well? just retarded
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>>2008294
no no, let's go back to the part where you claimed it was easy to buy
prove it
don't just try to dissuade me from wanting what I want, retard
people like different things, for example i like vaginas while you like dicks, that's just how the world is
>>
Newfag here
Should the clutch always be on even when riding on road? I occasionally ride on dirt roads. I notice there is a bit of delay when shifting when the clutch is on. Is this normal or ?
>>
>>2008280
I ride a hybrid almost every day, I just want something faster that has drop bars
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>>2008298
I'm no expert but I don't think it matters if it's on or not as long as your chain isn't falling off constantly. I forget to put it on all the time on my trail bike and the bike hasn't exploded yet.
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>>2008302
You can get by with a cheaper road bike. The seating position, thinner tires, and harder gears will get you going faster then just spending more money.
>>2008298
Had to understand you meant your clutched derailleur. Just turn it off and ride around with it and see if you like it, Before 2015 or so all derailleurs were clutchless.
>>2008296
So you are a troll. Good to know. Just stand up if it breaks lmao.
>>
>>2008308
god damn you're so retarded and annoying
no fucking wonder everyone hates cyclists
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>>2008311
bend it the other way before you pull it out of your ass
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>>2008308
My problem with it is that my chain keeps dropping out of the chainring when riding even on a significant bumps. Keeping it on solves the problem but the shifting isn't as responsive.
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>>2008290
Thank you for the reply! Would you recommend Topeak racks or does the brand not really matter? It's a lot of stuff to consider and I might have to just take what I can get locally unless I order online.
Also the gearing came stock with the bike. Like someone else mentioned a 40-11 8 speed is kinda wide and I definitely feel it. It's not like it fails to shift (usually), it's just not a very pleasant experience. And my chain coverage on the smaller gears especially the 11t is just miniscule. It wraps less than half of the gear. I think if I was mountain biking and mostly sticking to the larger gears I wouldn't notice any issue but I'm mostly on the smaller gears cause I'm on road 90% of the time. Bike is fine I'm just not using it the way the designers intended lol.
>>
>>2008269
I don't know anything about high-end bikes but $2000 for used seems high.
however, it comes with a power meter which I know is a really expensive upgrade if you buy aftermarket and dura ace is top of the line. you don't usually shell out for a power meter unless you race or are super cereal about training because it allows you to maximize your output so you know to tweak, say, diet or strengthening certain muscles if your output is bad on climbs, or you can't maintain power for long distances or something. so you're paying for that, you'd better want it.
also it sounds like those are fancy, perhaps aftermarket wheels which would be $$$. I'd look up if they came stock or not before deciding to pay. . just look up the bike's price new back in $2000 and figure out if the way the guy built it is worth it to you but used bikes usually depreciate a lot, maybe this guy is delusional
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>>2008316
You can go oldschool, which is running the bigger front chainring before you go over bigger bumps.
Basically increasing the tension on the chain via the derailleur spring.

I could see it bouncing off if you were in like a 22-11 gear or even a 32-11.
Otherwise if your front derailleur has a trim function bias it towards the bigger chainring(or your foot) so the chain would have a harder time bouncing off and onto your BB.

Or yeah, just leave the clutch on.
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>>2008344
Emonda SL8 msrp in 2015 was $4520
Zed wheelset is $750
I'm curious why was the frame repainted tho, maybe it was broken and then repaired
however from what I know carbon frames are almost as sturdy after repairing as when they were new
>>
sticker designs for people who park like dumb cunts in a bike lane?
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>>2008316
are you using a front derailleur? on 1x a narrow-wide chainring does more for chain retension than a clutcha mechanism.
>>
>>2008349
lgbtq+ on board
>>
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>>2007639
>>
>>2008292
>>2008294
>retarded + easy to buy
>steps back to "why do you even want this?" when asked where
>"so you are a troll"
the classic. kys. >>2008292 >>2008294 >>2008308
>>2008284
you too
>>
>>2008312
proving his point

>>2008316
keep the clutch on to avoid dropping your chain. it's the best solution. there is no perfect solution.
>>2008347
>carbon frames are almost as sturdy after repairing as when they were new
i.e. not at all sturdy lol
carbon is lightweight but nobody sane ever calls it sturdy
if you drop your bike you're supposed to have it x-rayed to check for fractures, that's not what sturdy means
>>
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>>2008352
here you go senpai
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>>2008373
I said as sturdy which does not imply its sturdiness against other materials
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>>2008374
as a cager id be maybe 10% mad
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>>2008373
BS. Generalization at least.
There are crabon frames being made where every compromise is made in the pursuit of light weight. The end result will be as >>2008373 described. Just like a steel bike when you go down to or below 0.4 mm wall thickness on your main tubes with the same ultimate goal in mind.
Now there are stupidly rugged ... "sturdy" ... crabon products out there. Bike frames too. Those modern heavy ass crabon MTB BSOs would probably take a beating with a hammer without delaminating. Iohan Gueorguiev (RIP king) springs to mind. He swapped in a crabon fork in on one of his later bikes and you can't really argue the forks task wasn't demanding. Iohann did put some miles on, the bike was never light and the treatment not gentle. He explained he liked the forks.
So yeah. Pure BS >>2008373 here. You can use whatever material you like to make something flimsy. Any sensible material choice can make something sturdy too.
>>
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Why do lock companies make this as difficult as possible
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>>2008379
carbon parts can't handle crashes or falls like every other type of material for making bikes can, and they will always be made fun of for it
>>2008382
because they don't want you to jump through all the hoops
the less people who do, the less money they have to pay out
corporations are never your friend, it's just marketing
>>
>>2008203
instead of fucking around with any stems i moved my saddle forward and tilted it a little bit to the front
it feels a lot better now and if i sit properly i dont feel any pressure on my hands
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>>2008386
Yeah nose up puts a little more weight on your taint, and forward saddle means you might sit more on the wider section.
Whatever works for ya, and free is good.
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>>2008385
sure bud. Care to back that claim up? It's material science after all and purely objective as such.
>>
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>>2008183
I picked up one of these recently:
https://www.amazon.com/Bell-Super-Adult-Helmet-Medium/dp/B07GT6Z5XZ/

Now what I didn't realize at the time was Bell also made moto helmets with the same style but they meet DOT standards but have way less venting:
https://www.amazon.com/Bell-Adventure-Helmet-Matte-Black/dp/B094XJRTM3/
>>
I have grx600 46/30 cranks. I want more like 46/34 or at least 46/32.

I've found that the 30T small ring is useless most of the time but 46 is fine as is. I need a little more oomph. what's the easiest way to do this?
>>
>>2008411
>i want a different small chainring
buy a different small chainring
are you retarded?

you don't need to change anything else. Although, if your chain is stretched it's a good time to change that, and maybe new cassette too
>>
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>>2008411
On a subcompact crank you should ride the entire cassette on the big ring.
It's 1x + bailout.

Pic rel shows the difference between 46/30 and 46/34. It's nothing except you lose 1 hill gear. Go find more extreme climbs. Work on spinning a higher cadence. Low gears are good. Don't delete them.

You should not be in the small ring unless you're climbing. Once you reach the middle of the small ring, shift up. Bigger gears wrap more teeth and feel better to spin.
Don't ride the >20t cassette cogs with your small ring.
>>
>>2008412
>are you retarded
honest to god I can't find bigger 80mm bcd chainrings. I'm not sure if there are any. I might need a road crankset.
>>
>>2008414
you should keep your gravel bike how it is and get a road bike as well.
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>>2008401
DOT is actually bad for helmets intended for mtb. Mtb helmets are made to protect you as much as possible in crashes under 30mph, in variable terrain. Moto helmets are designed to protect you in crashes up to 60mph, exclusively on concrete. They’re made differently on puprose
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>>2008411
Also, you should be able to spin that tiny gear up a 15%+ grade at 5 km/h (walking speed) in a straight line.

It's a useful gear, especially to tour on. If you bought a gravel bike and don't tour on it you're fucked.
>>
>>2008416
Yeah that's why I linked both variants for anon to look at. If he's going mach speed on an ebike a moto helmet might be the thing.
>>
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https://x.com/johnmkane1776/status/1812158115766263828
https://www.salsacycles.com/bikes/2019_warbird_carbon_105_700
>2019 salsa warbird (carbon)
>MSRP $2900
>105
>wheel upgrade
>1x "upgrade"
>shifters not original but can't tell what model they are
>60mm stem flipped over and slammed
>confiscated by law enforcement after involvement in multiple acts of terrorism

What should I offer?
>>
>>2008413
I thought for years that you're not supposed to crosschain big to big.
now I feel retarded
>>
>>2008425
Yes and no, it depends on the setup.
Usually you're avoiding the very big biggest gear or the 2-3 top ones.
Some front derailers will rub those gears.
If your chainring is already quite far out it can give an extreme angle
It might be really loud
Older chains don't bend as well sideways.

10 speed and up is sort of designed for big+big crosschaining though.
Your groupset has a 1x option even.
>>
>>2008425
but yeah, with a compact as well but especially with a subcompact, you try to stay in the big ring and just use the small as a bailout.
Whereas on 53/42 etc setups you shift the front a lot more often.
>>
what is the best commercial product chain lubricant?
>>
>>2008430
i dont know about the best but i use nigrin because of the funny name
>>
Looking to modernize an old steel bike to a gravel bike with 30 to 40mm tires. I have a general idea what to look out for but can't really pinpoint a particular model. I imagine rigid 26" 90s mtb would be a great fit but I'd like to put 29" wheels so 26" bikes will fuck with the geometry and handling so I gotta look for 700c bikes. I'm from Montreal and there's a shitload of bikes like pic related, lots of Miyatas, Marinoni, Bianchi, Miele, Raleigh, Specialized and other smaller japanese brands. Ideally, a touring/mtb frame as I want a robust frame that can take bumps and handle winter, plenty of tire clearance and mounting points. Any advice?
>>
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I'm mechanically retarded AF
I bought a new bike last year but I'm noticing its harder to pedal for whatever reason...
Like it's just stopping and harder to gain acceleration... What should I do?

Also is there any way to see MPH on your bike?
>>
I stepped in human shit at a stoplight and it is now embedded in my spd pedal. Thank you Portland.

We really need to ban narcan and just let all of these faggots kill themselves.
>>
>>2008434
be less weak
maybe your chain is getting seized up, maybe your bottom bracket is running dry of lube since they rarely come properly greased, who knows without having access to the bike

if you want to see mph use a speedometer
most people just use gps or their phones
>>
>>2008350
1x GRX chainring

>>2008345
>>2008373
yeah I guess I'll have to do that.
>>
>>2008436
How do I lube up the chain
>>
>>2008435
You're welcome, faggot. I bet you won't leave Portland though. And you'll step in poop again next week, it's the circle of life.
>>
>>2008438
there are a ton of videos on youtube walking you through what to do
basically clean the chain with solvent or degreaser, there are lots of options
how you lube it will depend on whether you're using wet or dry lube, just look up videos on how to do it, it's pretty simple but they'll zoom in on the parts to show you exactly where to put the dropper if you're using wet lube, etc.
>>
>>2008434
the gear ratio on the new bike is different from the other bike?
>>
>>2008439
Hopefully I will be gone within a few months. I was born here though so I'm kinda tied to the place. And I remember when it was better.
>>
>>2008430
>what is the best commercial product chain lubricant?

morgan blue race oil
>>
>>2008438
the lazy way is to wipe the chain down with towels or clothes to get any grime off, wipe each tooth of your gears as you rotate the crank, same with the derailleur jockey wheels teeth. put a drop of 3 in 1 oil on each chain link where they connect to each other, run through a bit, then wipe any excess away.

better would be to take the chain off, degrease, reoil or do wax if you want to go that way.
>>
>>2008433
Buy a gravel bike from Walmart and leave old bikes alone
>>
>>2008434
>>2008438
Well is the bicycle making any sort of noises that - intuitively - shouldn't be there? If so what are they like?
Generally, bicycles, even in a state of neglect, are stupidly efficient. The difference deflated tires, crusty chains and such thing cause is marginal. A few watts.
It is very very likely you are now relatively weaker than you were when you last rode a bicycle (as a child?) and simply delusional about your strength and fitnesy.
Anyways: Pump up the tires, clean and oil your chain and most importantly spinn everything round once and ensure it doesn't rub anywhere on its way round. That's hmthe easiest it will get.
Next step: Send it like a madman. Every day. If the knees start hurting don't push through, reduce the intensity.
>>
>>2008433
old touring bikes are fine they don't need to be grabblized
>>
Where can I get information about building my own bike, good carbon frames at various price points and more basic info for someone who wants to build their own bike. I know there are tons of content creators but everyone seem to have different opinions and often link to dodgy aliexpress stuff or overly priced things beyond my reach
>>
>>2008430
wax is the best chain lube, silca makes one of the best wax lubes
>>
>>2008466
>everyone seem to have different opinions
different people have different preferences, if you don't know what you prefer, you're just blindly implementing someone else's preferences

>and often link to dodgy aliexpress stuff or overly priced things beyond my reach
This is going to sound elitist and maybe it is, but building your own is for people on the extremes of the bell curve, either very broke and willing to take what they can dumpster dive in their ample spare time, or people who are not especially price sensitive, who want something fairly specific because they can't get it as a package deal, and aren't put off by the extra cost of buying a bunch of parts at retail instead of the package deal from a bike bike brand. From the wording of your post, you're going to get memed by durianrider, overtorque a seatpost, and ragequit after burning your first $1500 on other people's preferences
>>
>>2008466
I would buy a cheap used road bike that is kinda rough, take it apart and fix it up.
Then after riding that for a while you will understand what you like or don't like. Then decide if you want to build your own or not.

Hell of a lot of standards out there and if you are buying midgrade or nicer parts it gets expensive fast.
>>
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I flew with my folder recently, placed into a Rhinowalk bag.
Next time I'd like to bring my Gravel Bike, just cause it's faster and more fun... Any tutorials or tips on how to fly with it and back, safely and on the cheap?


I understand I'll have to take it apart. What tools will I need to bring? Will I need to put something to protect the fork/rearwheel bracket?
>>
Why haven’t they invented some super technology yet so that the tire/tyre can change its width and tread according to the driver’s wishes or automatically, just like the gears? I drove out onto a flat road - with one click I hid the tread, reduced the tire width and got a highway ic. I went out into rough terrain - I returned the tread and made the tire wider. I went to snow/dust - I convert MTB to fatbike in one click.
>>
>>2008496
you can check your local bike shops for the boxes they get new bikes from. they have all the protective packaging and the shop just throws them out.
but yeah, there's stuff you can buy, too.
the wheels come off and it's more compact
>>
>>2008517
that's like asking why your desk can't transform into a chair, we just don't have the technology for solids to transform shape yet. A possible answer to that is nanotechnology that could rearrange its structure at will, that possibility seems very, very far away though
>>
Had a custom bike built and specifically requested centerlock hubs to the framebuilder but he put 6 bolts...what do now? Am I an asshole for pointing he made a blatant mistake?
>>
>>2008524

no that's an important distinction and they need to fix it at their own expense. if they refuse, dispute the charge with your bank and move on to some other builder.
>>
>>2008517
In any wheeled vehicle, a tire’s performance is primarily based on its ability to deform against the ground. That means thicker sheets of rubber-soaked fabric won’t do very well, and that paper-thin see-through bubbles for tires will perform best (and probably immediately pop). Making any kind of variable tread system that is above all else, pliable is incredibly tough to do. There is a company that makes tires you can “zip” the tread off of, just as expected they perform like complete dog shit because tread is barely 1/3rd of the equation, suppleness is what makes the biggest difference, and having two different layers of tire means you will NOT be able to make a supple tire.
>>
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are Academy's bikes any good?
>>
>>2008579
>Claris
Go to a local bike store and buy something used at the same price point, you'll get double or better the bike for the money.
>>
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Is TPC a real company or a money laundering operation? How does this even work, they buy busted old bikes and try to sell them for 3x what they're worth?
>>
>>2008597
wow budget alloy wheels in place of carbon half the gears and an oversized pulley
youd be stupid not to buy this anon
>>
>>2008605
cable disks also
>>
>>2008606
>>2008605
It's like they found every delusional craigslist boomer in the bikes for sale by owner (sort by price descending) and they made a business out of it
>>
I'm fucking mad. I got a flat tire, went out and bought a new tube at the store, grabbed the 26" tube from the same brand and same location that I've always bought tubes. I get home and see that the spout on it is different. I got a "Presta" one that I've never seen before in my entire life. I do research on it and it's a shitty design that nobody uses.

WELL, NOW I HAVE TO GO RETURN IT AND GET A PROPER TUBE!
>>
presta is the default though? also not having spare tubes around is kinda dumb if you're still on legacy wheels
>>
>>2008611
I live in America. My bike pump doesn't work for these inferior valves.
>>
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>>2008613
>>
>>2008613
You must have a pump meant for children’s basketballs
>>
>>2008613
Dumb flyover
>>
>>2008613
You're retarded because almost any bike pump has a dual head these days. But you have my sympathy because presta is ass compared to Schrader I hate it
>>
>>2008609
you can get a brass convertor for a few cents a bike shop might give you one for free
>>
>>2008609
>he doesn't ride nice bikes, the post
sad if true.
Maybe schwalbe klic is more your speed
>>
>>2008616
I was just thinking my pump probably costs more than his bike and my front wheel costs more than his car
>>
>>2008624
The valve hole on his rim is drilled for Schrader valve, which is wider. If you try to use Presta valve tube, the tube can scrunch itself up through the hole as it inflates.
>>
>>2008579
>>2008593
>Go to a local bike store
or you can buy off CL or FB , there's usually a buying general to help pick your best deal
>>
>>2008597
is this US dollars or pesos?
it's a fairly good bike and admittedly I don't follow the new market but even I know
>2022
>5 grand
>even if it was top of the line, and it ain't
el - oh - elllllll
>>
>>2008609
>shitty design that nobody uses.
when it comes to bikes, the opposite is true, carbrain
>>
>>2008636
yeah USD, it doesn't make any sense unless it's just a front for a cartel to wash their narco dollars or something
>>
>>2008634
there's converters for that, too. I ride them myself
>>
>>2008638
I'm inclined to believe you. there's plenty of gullible people out there but most of the people buying used are going to use facebook or CL.
something's very fishy
>>
>>2008579
>>2008593
idk about academy bikes but modern claris derailleurs shift absolutely fine, don't buy second hand unless you know how to inspect for wear.
>>2008609
presta, dunlop and shrader all work fine, just because you're not used the other types doesn't mean they're shitty
>>2008613
ok nice bait
>>
so i've converted my road bike to a 1x chainring, making my left STI shifter useless. any suggestions for what to do with it? i currently just have the cable taped in place, would it be possible to nigger-rig it to a switch connected to front and rear lights? effectively turning the shifting into a lightswitch?
>>
>>2008653
>so i've converted my road bike to a 1x chainring

retard

>it be possible to nigger-rig it to a switch connected to front and rear lights? effectively turning the shifting into a lightswitch?

If you are already knowledgeable with arduinos and 3d printing you could kludge together something but it is a fool's errand.
>>
>>2008653
dropper post lol
>>
>>2008664
>retard
thank you
>If you are already knowledgeable with arduinos and 3d printing
i am not
>>2008664
>it is a fool's errand
all the front mech cable does is pull back and forth yes? so attaching it to a springloaded retractable switch should technically work right?
>>2008665
lol, seen that before but not quite useful for my purposes.
>>
>>2008634
Or, you can run it in the wrong hole for several years and over 800 miles without any issues
It’s a rubber balloon inside of a shoe lol it’s not rocket science
>>
I have an aluminum frame road bike built in 2002, would I notice a big difference if I bought a newer one?
>>
>>2008690
It'll have through axles instead of quick releases and probably more effective brakes, plus clearance for bigger tires. Nothing wholly game changing. Probably a 2x instead of 3x transmission, maybe an easier climbing gear.
>>
>>2008690
Maybe, maybe not.
Your current frame could ride better for you,or the new one might ride better. As the other anon said the new one will be "modernized" which has pros and cons.
>>2008634
tube companies make some presta valve core hold down washers(the thing you thread on the valve) that are flat on one side, and larger on the other side to fill a schrader hole.
>>
>>2008690
2002 aluminum roadie could mean heavy shit, or fancy shit. I've got a 2002 road bike and the frame is under 1kg, lighter than my 2016 aluminum roadie. It also only fits 23mm tires and has a 1 inch head tube.

I'll tell ya what though, it feels like a bike!!! If you're comfortable on your old one, I doubt you're missing out on much.
>>
>>2008690
I have an 04 Cannondale CAAD with Ultegra and a 2023 Supersix with mech 105. (demoe'd DI2 and didn't really like the lack of feedback.). New one definitely smooths out the road buzz better but is heavier and the stock wheels in particular are boat anchors compared to muh ksyrium SLs. Just one man's opinion, take it for what it's worth.
>>
is it normal that my dick shrivels up if i go really hard?
got off my bike after a long ride today and it felt like my wiener was about to invert
>>
I'm getting my bike repaired and guy quoted me as needing
>A new chain
I think my current one had some life left but fair
>A new cassette
I did just buy one last November, I cycle about 70~100 miles a week but do they wear this fast?
>A new chain ring (2x)
Sounds about right
>A new bottom bracket
Very likely since mine has had some play for a good 6 months or so
>New break calipers
100% I need thoes
>New handlebar tape
Mine is ok but could easily do with another one since its starting to wear
All parts+labor is going to be around £360, does that sound about right? it does also include pick up and drop off but I don't think that really factors into the price at all since they will do that for free
>>
>>2008736
lol we all repair out own bikes, we don't know what shops charge
>>
>>2008741
I'm buying a new chain, a cassette, a chain ring (2x) a bottom bracket, new break callipers and some new handle tape
It's going to cost me about £260~310
Does that sound about right?
>>
>>2008743
Tell him to fuck off with his aliexpress drivetrain, nobody wants to suffer his bad purchase decisions, tell him you don’t want it and also specifically that you won’t pay anything at all if he lies and swaps the drivetrain anyways. You need brakes, and he should be happy to wrap the tape you just bought from him for free

Whatever parts he’s selling, theyre probably exactly MSRP, and he’s also gonna charge up to $150/hr in labor
>>
>>2008736
sounds pretty decent for what you're getting, worth if it's a good bike. personally i think everything except maybe the bottom bracket is pretty easy to do yourself and good to learn, but if you don't feel like it or value the time spent more, just let the shop do it.
>>
>>2008579
>>2008651
>but modern claris derailleurs shift absolutely fine
Fuck you I used both old and modern claris and as soon as I changed to GRX812 I was so angry that I spent so many years with shitty stuff that always felt like a chore to ride on
>>
>>2008761
You're going to feel the same about GRX812 when you upgrade to GRX815 Di2.
>>
>>2008761
obviously a $1000 high end groupset performs better than an entry level $200 one, in my experience it just works, unless it's badly indexed or something.
>>
>>2008756
Thanks! Bike is about £1000 amd I use(d) it pretty much daily.
I think if it was one or two things that needed fixing I wouldn't mind giving it a shot myself but since it seems like the entire bike needs a total work + me not having access to the tools (and I'm worried I'll break everything) I would feel more comfortable having a professional look over it.
>>
>>2008754
>he should be happy to wrap the tape you just bought from him for free
god you're a faggot
>>
>think I went a size too small on muh road bike
>scratched up dropout, can't return it
I-I'll just ride around with 25mm of spacers I guess senpai
>>
>>2008797
that's really not a lot of spacers
>>
>>2008761
you just had your shit setup badly. cables aren't magic.

i've ridden behind freds so often with clicky bad indexing on $$$ drivetrains
>>
>>2008806
so because some people don't have their shit adjusted properly, it means that anon didn't? solid logic.
>>
>>2008725
>>2008734
It's a CAAD5

>>2008735
Pudendal nerve compression. It can lead to permanent loss of feeling or impotence. Get a saddle with a cutout in the middle to take the pressure off.
>>
>>2008798
no, you're right, but my real worry is that that might still be too low for me on big days.

>>2008818
I would associate nerve issues with numbness or tingling rather than shrinkage. I've shrivelled up alarmingly after long efforts in the cold, both riding and running, so I don't think it's necessarily a saddle issue or a major problem, though if you're getting other discomfort or numbness it's obviously worth messing around a bit with saddle selection and fit.
>>
>take bike to shop
>"Everything is good t. Desk clerk"
>Ride home. I hear some rattle but bike seems okay
>Take a closer look couple days later
>Derailleur hangar looks bent
Goddammit
>>
>cleaned my bike for the first time
>everything came out nicely
>apply new lube to chain
>no problem whatsoever, satisfied
>ride it next day
>it rains and now the chains are muddy a bit black and dirty again
GRIM I don't want to do it again
>>
>>2008867
You should at least be wiping your chain down after every ride anyway, it's just part of putting the bike away
>>
How hard is it to bend your frame or wheels? I don’t think it happened but I haven’t rode in 2 years after a nasty fall and I’m trying to fix up the bike after neglect. I feel like my tires have a slight wobble and the frame has paint damage from what I’m guessing is tire rub. Is this just an alignment issue and I need to adjust the axles slightly?

Second question.

I’m also fixing up the wife’s bike. Everything apears to be fine but the chain is very rusty. I plan to change it but I need these bikes to be road ready for a short ride by the weekend and don’t know dick about chains. Is it worth spraying with WD4D and using a soft metal brush to clean it up?
>>
>>2008871
Truing wheels is more tedious than difficult but you do need a special wrench. It's done at the spoke nipples, not the hub. If you don't have a truing stand you can use zip ties on your frame to gauge where it wobbles, though it's hard to get dish correct if you can't flip it around. Worn paint from tire rub likely means either yes, wheels are way out of true or you were riding on improperly seated quick releases or something. Bent frame is a harder fix, though you can maybe get there with a 2x4 and a dream at the risk of cracking a weld. It's pretty hard to bend a frame though. Rusty chain is fixable. Spray it down, brush the rust off, but then measure to see if it's worn enough that it's due for replacement. And don't assume the WD-40 will work as chain lube, you need an actual chain lube to prevent further wear and rust.
>>
>>2008873
Thanks for the quick answer. I’m about to walk it up to the local shop now to get a tube replaced and will ask them to check it all out and do what they can with a tune up. What kills me is the paint starting to peel. I’ll just do a slop job of painting over it myself and just deal with it not being a pretty bike anymore, but it’s sentimental to me and I wanna really fix it up a lot better over the summer with some new parts and get back into riding around town.
>>
>>2008871
>>2008873
>>2008877
Update, turns out the tire rub is a factory error on the bike, I forget the word the mechanic used but it’s where you “squish” the frame to make extra room for your tire, they never “squished” one side of the fork. Mechanic says it might not be a huge deal since the tire dosent appear to be damaged from it and it will only run if I take hard left turns. He says if it bothers me enough or becomes an issue he will take a couple swings with a hammer with my permission to retry and sent the frame a little to give my tire more room.

All in all feels fucking great to ride again, I can’t believe how out of shape I became from taking a couple years off, my legs are tired after just 3 miles.
>>
>>2008818
>>2008836
ok i'll look into getting a different seat
i still have the stock seat that came with the bike and that thing is rock hard
>>
>>2008884
I feel ya brah. I have been getting back into riding for the last couple months, and even 40 miles took a couple weeks. Now I am trying for 45-50 with more climbing finally.
First couple sessions were brutal.
>>2008869
Last time I did that road grime/gunk got in the chain and it was louder, then I cleaned and relubed.
>>
>>2007683
This
Started cycling at 155kg, 120 now. Never crossed my mind that something might break.
>>
>>2008841

this is why we wrench our own bikes here
>>
First road bike, it's not that fancy but it does go fast enough that I want to try clipless pedals.

I know that the recommendation is typically SPD since they are more forgiving. However, should I just go straight to SPD-SL? How many times am I going to fall with them before I learn? My thinking is this road bike (Steel, SLX tubing) is at some point going to be too heavy for me and I'll want to build or invest in some modern carbon road set up. And it seems silly to ride dedicated road bikes with mtb pedals.

Either way probably going with some Lake shoes since no one else has the curtsey to post their actual shoe dimensions in a public place. CX or MX 219 depending on which cleats I decide on first.
>>
>>2008999
>However, should I just go straight to SPD-SL?

nah. full blown road pedals are only worth it if you're the kind of athlete that is routinely riding double centuries or qualifying for ironman kona or whatever. normal SPDs are all you'll ever need as a mere mortal.

Everyone falls at least once but usually not much more than that.
>>
imagine not waxing your chain



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