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What is the Windows 10 of literature?
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>>6916848
>sequel
>made by someone old
Hey I think I found one of the people who know nothing about the medium.
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>>6916841
This is true for all Windows tbh
Install Gentoo
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IJ
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>>6916838
my diary, tbh
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>>6916849
>the medium
no shame in not following the mainstream news, normie

How autistic is my book shelf /lit/
>>
Bookshelves aren't people and can't be autistic.
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>>6918471
3
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>>6918471
>posting it on lit
fucking catatonic level
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>>6918474
Autistic another synonym for bad
The 4chan lexicon is full of words that now just mean bad, try substituting in cuck, retarded (full retard, even), or gay.

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What does /lit/ think of Sigmund Fraud?
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>>6918232
I have stories from my psych classes that would make /pol/ cream its pants
>Jewish professor
>Not even kidding, her work primarily uses modern neuroscience to analyze Jewish sacred texts
>constantly relates everything back to freud
>refuses to concede on any ground that freud is anything more than foundational in modern psychology
>rephrases everything in terms of freud's obsession with sexuality
>at several points outright lied about Freud's personal beliefs
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>>6918355
Psychoanalysis is almost a cult by now.
The organizations who train therapists around here force you to regularly go into an analysis session. Oh, and thei are more than four times as expensive as, say, getting your diploma in behavioral therapy.

>tfw I studied psychology in fucking Vienna and Psychoanalysis is not and never was part of the Curriculum
They are in the educations-department. :D
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>>6918216
I think he's a very cool bullshit artist.

I also laugh every time when I think about how he forbade his wife from being a practising Jew from the day they got married.
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>>6918216
The guy was fucking brilliant. I don't think many people on /lit/ have actually read his work (go figure) so they call him a hack. He wasn't right about everything he said as is almost always the case when someone is so far ahead of popular thinking. Many people have twisted his works to support their own ideas and in turn he does have a cult-like following that includes many people who themselves are frauds.

In particular, his application of his psychological theories to literature and lit theory is just downright based.
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>>6918447
Jung is a better analyst and literary critic than Freud. Fight me you austrian manlet.

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Writer's block thread?

Let's help each other out.

I need ways to suss out some details fluidly, and I'm not sure how. Several of my characters are convening in a literal brainstorm that is basically representative of my own stuck thoughts. It's a council of sorts, to work out the details of much of the middle half of the book in which they'll go to war. Any ideas on what would make such a campaign interesting? I'm looking for broad, generalized sketches here. What makes war interesting to read about?

Post your own troubles and I will try my best to add my thoughts.
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>a literal brainstorm

Human angles make war interesting to read about.

I'm not blocked I'm just hungover and don't think it's a positive state of mind in which to write.
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>Human angles make war interesting to read about.
To expand on this, maybe have a few little scenes from different arenas of the battlefield showing a few different ways in which it can affect people in different walks of life. In order to do that I'd research lots of real life war blogs and journalism to find angles and events I'd not have thought of myself from a cold start.
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>>6918449
Ha, I suppose I just meant that was what they are there for, not doing anything else or brainstorming indirectly. Thanks for that dank pic though.

Thanks.
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>>6918456
Good advice, I've already found an interesting one, I thank you.

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>Tfw you read a book not because you enjoy it, but to be that guy who has read it.
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>tfw
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>>6916895
>but to be that guy who has read it.
why
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>>6917513

To keep propped up a sense of superiority over one's netflixbinging peers.
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bump

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Hegel foresaw the death of art. He was wrong. As Zizek notes, Hegel couldn't see abstract art-art without form.

Tocqueville, however, did see it. It's one of his famous arguments against democracy in principle. Abstract colors and shapes do not require any education to appreciate, which is why they were famous.

How did Hegel fuck up, when Tocqueville saw the truth? Do we just accept that plebs will dominate art at the end of history?

inb4 classicism is dead
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>>6918073
>being this fucking disgusting
Cosmopolitanism and blurring human hierarchy is the very core of what's wrong in humanity.
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>>6918073
to be fucking quite honest?
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>>6918228
Go find a gutter to rot in, temporarily embarrassed billionaire.

>>6918253
"frankly"
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>>6918278
>Go find a gutter to rot in, temporarily embarrassed billionaire.

Hahaha quite a leap there in logic don't ya think, Lenin?
>>
modern "art" is shit tbh

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What textbooks will you have for your fall classes, /lit/?
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>>6915525
That'd be a good time to walk out and change state.
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A bunch of Brazilian and Portuguese Law textbooks which I won't even buy and much less touch.

I'm a Law student because my parents ask anyway, so I don't care.

I'll keep focusing on poetry and philosophy, which are my only two passions.
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>>6916830
whats your longterm plan?
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>>6915383
Inorganic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry: A Molecular Approach
Applied Partial Differential Equations
Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

I have a big backlog of fiction and nonfiction to read as well.

Who are the most essential, must-read English-language poets, poets only a disgusting philistine retard would be unfamiliar with?
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Milton, Shakespeare, Blake, Chaucer, Keats, Donne, Shelley, Eliot, Byron, Coleridge.
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>>6918261
In that thing where Nabokov is critiquing authors and calling them second-rate and puffed up, he says Shakespeare, Milton, Tolstoy, and Joyce are geniuses.
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Yeats.
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Don't you tossers forget about me.
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>>6918151
I heard bitches was talkin shit

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>Long ago Friedrich Nietzsche perceived how Western civilization was moving in the direction of the Last Man, an apathetic creature with no great passion or commitment. Unable to dream, tired of life, he takes no risks, seeking only comfort and security: “A little poison now and then: that makes for pleasant dreams. And much poison at the end, for a pleasant death. They have their little pleasures for the day, and their little pleasures for the night, but they have a regard for health. ‘We have discovered happiness,’ say the Last Men, and they blink.”

What is wrong with this lifestyle? Sounds like the best way to live one's life. You're lucky to not live in a warzone, a 3rd world country, under an oppressive regime or all 3 at the same time. Why not make everything comfortable, listen to music, watch films, take drugs etc etc?
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>>6918307
http://praxeology.net/zara.htm

Quote the part where he says they are unhappy.
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>>6918274
Wow, thank you! That's what I was looking for. Perfectly clear now.
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>>6916453
There is nothing wrong with it, it's just not edgy enough for Nietzsche.

Nietzsche theoretically really liked edgy things, more than you would expect from a ex-teacher on disability benefits who would spend his days going on walks and writing down his opinions on things.
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>>6918315
>someone who knows what theyre talking about
>>
>>6916608
>plato shitters talking crap about spooks
spooky.

Goodreads Thread? Find new friends and gather a nice update feed. I start:
https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/2408134-sebastian
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>>6915314
>>6915000
lookey here:
>>6912499
>>
https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/45541308-kc-neate

Just made this account, 20 year old English Lit student from England
>>
Seriously though guys I'm not adding you if you have 0 books.
>>
https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/6536175-beukenick
>>
Poster of >>6906959 here, I can't believe how many of you there are on GR, I thought about making a thread like this a while ago but didn't think there would be much of a response.

Anyway thanks for all the adds, I look forward to seeing what you are reading & how you feel about it.

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Write your suicide note as if you would kill yourself tomorrow. Be sincere.
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>>6918401
No.
>>
I'm just tired of feeling inadequate.

Sorry, everyone. I know I'm being selfish.
>>
Brb rerolling a new char
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>>6915701
Saved
>>
I wrote for years before realising that I have nothing important or meaningful to say. I'm just another superfluous man with nothing to contribute to the world. Good bye.

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Why did Christopher Hitchens make fun of Thomas Jefferson for being into Laurence Sterne? Was it simply because Hitchens was too autistic to appreciate a good penis joke?
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https://youtu.be/fxBspuDadLw
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https://youtu.be/SFV4DzbAHiA

what the fuck is this
>>
Nietzsche on Sterne

The Freest Writer.

In a book for free spirits one cannot avoid mention of Laurence Sterne, the man whom Goethe honoured as the freest spirit of his century. May he be satisfied with the honour of being called the freest writer of all times, in comparison with whom all others appear stiff, square toed, intolerant, and downright boorish! In his case we should not speak of the clear and rounded but of "the endless melody" — if by this phrase we arrive at a name for an artistic style in which the definite form is continually broken, thrust aside and transferred to the realm of the indefinite, so that it signifies one and the other at the same time. Sterne is the great master of double entendre, this phrase being naturally used in a far wider sense than is commonly done when one applies it to sexual relations. We may give up for lost the reader who always wants to know exactly what Sterne thinks about a matter, and whether he be making a serious or a smiling face (for he can do both with one wrinkling of his features; he can be and even wishes to be right and wrong at the same moment, to interweave profundity and farce). His digressions are at once continuations and further developments of the story, his maxims contain a satire on all that is sententious, his dislike of seriousness is bound up with a disposition to take no matter merely externally and on the surface. So in the proper reader he arouses a feeling of uncertainty whether he be walking, lying, or standing, a feeling most closely akin to that of floating in the air. He, the most versatile of writers, communicates something of this versatility to his reader.

1/2
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Yes, Sterne unexpectedly changes the parts, and is often as much reader as author, his book being like a play within a play, a theatre audience before another theatre audience. We must surrender at discretion to the mood of Sterne, although we can always expect it to be gracious. It is strangely instructive to see how so great a writer as Diderot has affected this double entendre of Sterne's — to be equally ambiguous throughout is just the Sternian super humour. Did Diderot imitate, admire, ridicule, or parody Sterne in his Jacques le Pataliste} One cannot be exactly certain, and this uncertainty was perhaps intended by the author. This very doubt makes the French unjust to the work of one of their first masters, one who need not be ashamed of comparison with any of the ancients or moderns. For humour (and especially for this humorous attitude towards humour itself) the French are too serious. Is it necessary to add that of all great authors Sterne is the worst model, in fact the inimitable author, and that even Diderot had to pay for his daring? What the worthy Frenchmen and before them some Greeks and Romans aimed at and attained in prose is the very opposite of what Sterne aims at and attains. He raises himself as a masterly exception above all that artists in writing demand of themselves — propriety, reserve, character, steadfastness of purpose, comprehensiveness, perspicuity, good deportment in gait and feature. Unfortunately Sterne the man seems to have been only too closely related to Sterne the writer. His squirrel-soul sprang with insatiable unrest from branch to branch; he knew what lies between sublimity and rascality; he had sat on every seat, always with unabashed watery eyes and mobile play of feature. He was — if language does not revolt from such a combination — of a hard-hearted kindness, and in the midst of the joys of a grotesque and even corrupt imagination he showed the bashful grace of innocence. Such a carnal and spiritual hermaphroditism, such untrammelled wit penetrating into every vein and muscle, was perhaps never possessed by any other man.

2/2

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Is life worth living?
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>>6915842
tbf, while those things all suck, they are circumstantial, once its happened, its happened, you might as well wait to see if things get better.

Losing the ability to feel happiness (i.e. depression), is a different story.
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>>6915856
Have you tried meditation? it feels a lot like the experience you are describing. If you are unhappy it couldn't hurt to try it anyway.
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>>6914470
9.975/10
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>>6914575
lit is the foundation of philosophy
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>>6914470
kek

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Aye c/lit/s

What do you guy's think of Alan Watts?

I've been listening to a few of his lectures and i'm currently reading 'The Way of Zen', I think he can be a bit long winded, but nonetheless he makes good points.
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>>6917210
try out his "good points" in real time and see how that works for you
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>>6917248
>I haven't really seen anything that show the lighter side of Alan that you're referencing
You haven't noticed that he's laughing throughout every lecture he gives?
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>>6917210
I only read his 'Behold the Spirit' which was his thesis from his seminary days. Interesting to see a Buddhist's attempt at Christian theology.
Overall I think he's pretty cool and accessible, and does a decent job of introducing Westerner's to Eastern religion, but I would hesitate to use him in a school paper or something.
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>>6917210

he is not rigorous in logic, as anybody being the bastard of the academia and the entertainment industry.

=>He is good for an entry into the subject, but must be abandoned quickly. You will recognize rigorous works as soon as you see them, especially if you have mediocre sources at your beginning.
>>
>>6917631
True I just never heard him actually say not to take him too seriously
>>6917649
I would say the same for The Way of Zen, a good introduction to certain thoughts of western philosophy.
>>6917722
Again, how is he mediocre? I am genuinely curious. Please elaborate before using ad hominems.

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Right /lit/, I'd like to hear your answer to the following question:

We have two novels.
Novel A has a main focus on dealing with the social paradigms of its time and culture. Centuries later novel A will be studied as a deep analysis of a certain period of a certain country.
Novel B has a main focus on dealing with universal (or at least very large) human conflicts. Centuries later novel B will be studied as a deep analysis of the human condition.

Which one is the best novel? If you think that is impossible to determine the best novel, give your personal preference.
In shorter terms: Specific themes X Universal themes
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>>6917914

I'd say any book is Novel A, but only great books are both A and B.
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>>6917914

I don't really understand what you're trying to say.

Which one's better? Obviously that's a matter of perspective. If you're a historian who wants to gain insight on how a certain culture behaved, then having a book that goes more into specific cultural behaviors is more valuable. If you're a philosopher that wants to be enlightened about certain aspects of universal life, then universal themes would suit you better.

Shit thread tbh
>>
I haven't read either so I can't make a good decision
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>>6917928
Why?
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>>6917950

because it's rare that a novel can grasp well the universal human condition. It may talk about universal things, but to actually portray it in a way others won't have already thought by themselves requires some kind of genious.


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